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Definitions of accord

  1. go together; "The colors don't harmonize"; "Their ideas concorded" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. sympathetic compatibility Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a written agreement between two states or sovereigns Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. concurrence of opinion; "we are in accord with your proposal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. harmony of people's opinions or actions or characters; "the two parties were in agreement" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. allow to have; "grant a privilege" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action; harmony of mind; consent; assent. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Harmony of sounds; agreement in pitch and tone; concord; as, the accord of tones. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Agreement, harmony, or just correspondence of things; as, the accord of light and shade in painting. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, bars a suit. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To bring to an agreement, as persons; to reconcile; to settle, adjust, harmonize, or compose, as things; as, to accord suits or controversies. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To grant as suitable or proper; to concede; to award; as, to accord to one due praise. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To agree in pitch and tone. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; - preceded by own; as, of one's own accord. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; - followed by to. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; - followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To agree; give; grant; as, to accord due praise; to adjust or bring to agreement; to be in harmony; to agree in pitch and tone. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Agreement; unison; harmony. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To agree: to be in correspondence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To grant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Agreement: harmony: (with own) spontaneous motion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To grant; allow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. To bring to agreement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To agree; harmonize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Harmony; agreement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Spontaneous impulse; choice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Agreement; harmony of minds; concurrence of opinion or will; harmony of sounds; just correspondence of things; will, or spontaneous impulse; adjustment of a difference. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To grant or concede. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To agree; to be in correspondence; to harmonise. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To make to agree or correspond; to grant or give; to be suitable. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Agreement; consent; harmony. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; -- preceded by own; as, of one's own accord. mso.anu.edu.au
  33. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; -- followed by to. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; -- followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. The agreement between parties to settle their claims and differences. thelawdictionary.org
  36. In contracts. A satisfaction agreed upon between the party injuring and the party injured, which when performed is a bar to all actions upon this account. 3 Bl. Com. 15; Bac. Abr, Accord. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. In order to make a good accord it is essential: 1. That the accord be legal. An agreement to drop a criminal prosecution as a satisfaction for an assault and imprisonment, is void. 5 East, 294. See 2 Wils. 341 Cro. Eliz. 541. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  38. It must be advantageous to the contracting party; hence restoring to the plaintiff his chattels, or his land, of which the defendant has wrongfully dispossessed him, will not be any consideration to support a promise by the plaintiff not to sue him for those injuries. Bac. Abr. Accord, &c. A; Perk. s. 749; Dyer, 75; 5 East, R. 230; 1 Str. R. 426; 2 T. R. 24; 11 East, R. 390; 3 Hawks, R. 580; 2 Litt. R. 49; 1 Stew. R. 476; 5 Day, R. 360; 1 Root, R. 426; 3 Wend. R. 66; 1 Wend, R. 164; 14 Wend. R. 116; 3 J. J. Marsh. R. 497. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  39. It must be certain; hence an agreement that the defendant shall relinquish the possession of a house in satisfaction, &c., is not valid, unless it is also agreed at what time it shall be relinquished. Yelv. 125. See 4 Mod. 88; 2 Johns. 342; 3 Lev. 189. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  40. The defendant must be privy to the contract. If therefore the consideration for the promise not to sue proceeds from another, the defendant is a stranger to the agreement, and the circumstance that the promise has been made to him will be of no avail. Str. 592; 6, John. R. 37; 3 Monr. R. 302 but in such case equity will grant relief by injunction. 3 Monr. R. 302; 5 East, R. 294; 1 Smith's R. 615; Cro. Eliz. 641; 9 Co. 79, b; 3 Taunt. R. 117; 5 Co. 117, b. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  41. The accord must be executed. 5 Johns. R. 386; 3 Johns. Cas. 243; 16 Johns. R. 86; 2 Wash. C. C. R. 180; 6 Wend. R. 390; 5 N. H. Rep. 136; Com. Dig. Accord, B 4. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  42. Accord with satisfaction when completed has two effects; it is a payment of the debt; and it is a species of sale of the thing given by the debtor to the creditor, in satisfaction; but it differs from it in this, that it is not valid until the delivery of the article, and there is no warranty of the thing thus sold, except perhaps the title; for in regard to this, it cannot be doubted, that if the debtor gave on an accord and satisfaction the goods of another, there would be no satisfaction. See Dation, en paiement. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  43. See in general Com. Dig. h. t.; Bac. Ab. h. t.; Com. Dig. Pleader, 2 V 8; 5 East, R. 230; 4 Mod. 88 ; 1 Taunt. R. 428; 7 East, R. 150; 1 J. B. Moore, 358, 460; 2 Wils. R. 86; 6 Co. 43, b; 3 Chit. Com. Law, 687 to 698; Harr. Dig. h. t.; 1 W. Bl. 388; 2 T. R. 24; 2 Taunt. 141; 3 Taunt. 117; 5 B.& A. 886; 2 Chit. R. 303 324; 11 East, 890; 7 Price, 604; 2 Greenl. Ev. 28; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 805; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 2478-79-80-81. Vide Discharge of Obligations. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  44. ACCORD (from Fr. accorder, to agree), in law, an agreement between two parties, one of whom has a right of action against the other, to give and accept in substitution for such right any good legal consideration. Such an agreement when executed discharges the cause of action and is called Accord and Satisfaction. en.wikisource.org
  45. Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; preceded by own; as, of one's own accord. dictgcide_fs
  46. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; followed by to. dictgcide_fs
  47. To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks. dictgcide_fs
  48. ak-kord', v.i. to agree: to be in correspondence (with).--v.t. to cause to agree: to reconcile: to grant (to, of a person).--n. agreement: harmony.--n. ACCORD'ANCE, agreement: conformity--also ACCORD'ANCY.--adj. ACCORD'ANT, agreeing: corresponding.--adv. ACCORD'ANTLY.--p.adj. ACCORD'ING, in accordance: agreeing: harmonious.--adv. ACCORD'INGLY, agreeably: suitably: in agreement (with what precedes).--ACCORDING AS, in proportion as, or agreeably as; ACCORDING TO, in accordance with, or agreeably to.--OF ONE'S OWN ACCORD, of one's own spontaneous motion. [O. Fr. acorder--L. ad, to, cor, cordis, the heart.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. Be in harmony or consistent (abs., or with; chiefly of things); grant (indulgence, request, welcome, &c.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. Consent (with one a.), mutual agreement; treaty of peace; harmonious correspondence in colour, pitch, tone; assent (of one\'s own a.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. n. [French] Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action; consent ; — harmony of sounds ; concord ; chord; —agreement ;—voluntary or spontaneous motion. Cabinet Dictionary
  52. A compact, an agreement; concurrence, union of mind; harmony, symmetry. Complete Dictionary

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