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Definitions of account

  1. be the sole or primary factor in the existence, acquisition, supply, or disposal of something; "Passing grades account for half of the grades given in this exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the quality of taking advantage; "she turned her writing skills to good account" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. importance or value; "a person of considerable account"; "he predicted that although it is of small account now it will rapidly increase in importance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a statement of money owed for goods or services; "he paid his bill and left"; "send me an account of what I owe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a short account of the news; "the report of his speech"; "the story was on the 11 o'clock news"; "the account of his speech that was given on the evening news made the governor furious" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.; "the explanation was very simple"; "I expected a brief account" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of informing by verbal report; "he heard reports that they were causing trouble"; "by all accounts they were a happy couple" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. grounds; "don't do it on my account"; "the paper was rejected on account of its length"; "he tried to blame the victim but his success on that score was doubtful" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a statement of recent transactions and the resulting balance; "they send me an accounting every month" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. furnish a justifying analysis or explanation; "I can't account for the missing money" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. keep an account of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a formal contractual relationship established to provide for regular banking or brokerage or business services; "he asked to see the executive who handled his account" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. an itemized statement of money owed for goods shipped or services rendered; "he paid his bill and left"; "send me an account of what I owe" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. to give an account or representation of in words; "Discreet Italian police described it in a manner typically continental" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning; as, the Julian account of time. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review; as, to keep one's account at the bank. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; as, no satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena. Hence, the word is often used simply for reason, ground, consideration, motive, etc.; as, on no account, on every account, on all accounts. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A statement of facts or occurrences; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description; as, an account of a battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A statement and explanation or vindication of one's conduct with reference to judgment thereon. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Importance; worth; value; advantage; profit. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To reckon; to compute; to count. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To value, estimate, or hold in opinion; to judge or consider; to deem. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To recount; to relate. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To render or receive an account or relation of particulars; as, an officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; - with to. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To render an account; to answer in judgment; - with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; - with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To reckon; compute; count. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To explain: with for; give a detailed financial statement. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. A reckoning; a financial statement; a narrative; anything in the form of a statement, written or verbal; reason or consideration; profit; estimation; importance. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To reckon: to judge, value. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. (with for) To give a reason. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. A counting: statement: value: sake. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Statement; reckoning; behalf. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To reckon; estimate; to assign the causes. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To consider; estimate; count; compute. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. To answer (to a person for a thing). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To explain; followed by for. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A reckoning; computation; record; statement; description; notice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. An explanation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Importance; consideration. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Computation or method of reckoning; a register of debts and credits; a written statement in detail of moneys due for goods purchased, or services of any kind rendered; the sum total; a narrative; a recital of particular transactions and events, verbal or written; a statement or explanation; reason or consideration, as a motive; importance; estimation; profit; advantage; behalf; sake. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To deem or judge. To account of, to hold in esteem; to value. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To render an account or relation of particulars; to give reasons for. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A sum stated on a slate or paper; a narrative or statement; regard; explanation a statement of prices, expenses, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. To judge; to esteem; to value; to give reasons; to explain; to be liable. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; -- with to. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. To render an account; to answer in judgment; -- with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities. mso.anu.edu.au
  51. To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; -- with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty. mso.anu.edu.au
  52. A record of changes in financial matters such as assets, goods, and services. Legally it is a contract to report amounts due or recieved. thelawdictionary.org
  53. Remedies. This is the name of a writ or action more properly called account render. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  54. It is applicable to the, case of an unliquidated demand, against a person who is chargeable as bailiff or receiver. The use of it, is where the plaintiff wants an account and cannot give evidence of his right without it. 5 Taunt. 431 It is necessary. where the receipt was directed to a merchandising which makes all uncertainty of the nett remain, till the account is finished; or where a man is charged as bailiff, whereupon the certainty of his receipt appears not till account. Hob. 209.; See also 8 Cowen, R. 304; 9 Conn. R. 556; 2 Day, R. 28; Kirby, 164; 3 Gill & John. 388; 3 Verm. 485; 4 Watts, 420; 8 Cowen, 220. It is also the proper remedy by one partner against another. 15 S. & R. 153 3 Binn. 317; 10 S. & R. 220; 2 Conn. 425; 4 Verm. 137; 1 Dall. 340; 2 Watts 86. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  55. The interlocutory judgment in this action is (quod computet) that the defendant render an account upon which judgment auditors are assigned to him to hear and report his account. (See I Lutwych, 47; 3 Leon. 149, for precedents) As the principal object of the action is to compel a settlement of the account in the first instance, special bail cannot be demanded, (2 Roll. Rep. 53; 2 Keble, 404,) nor are damagos awarded upon the first judgment, nor given except ratione interplacitationis, (Cro. Eliz. 83; 5 Binn. 664; 24 Ed. 3. 16; 18 Ed. 3. 55; Reg. Brev. 136 b,) although it is usual to conclude the count with a demand of damages. (Lib. Int. fo. 16. fo. 20; 1 Lutw. 51. 58; 2 H. 7. 13.) The reason assigned for this rule, is, that it may be the defendant will not be found in arrears after he has accounted, and the court cannot know until the settlement of the account whether the plaintiff has been endamaged or not. 7 H. 6. 38. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  56. This action combines the properties of a legal and equitable action. The proceedings up to the judgment quod computet, and subsequent to the account reported by the auditors are conducted upon the principles of the common law. But the account is to be adjusted upon the most liberal principles of equity and, good faith. (Per Herle, Ch. J. 3 Ed. 3. 10.) The court it is said are judges of the actionthe auditors of the account, Bro. Ab. Ace. 48, and both are judges of record, 4 H. 6. 17; Stat. West. 2. c. 11. This action has received extension in Pennsylvania. 1 Dall. 339, 340. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  57. The fist judgment (quod computet) is enforeed by a capias ad computandum where defendant refuses to appear before the auditors, upon which he may be held to bail, or in default of bail be made to account in prison. The final judgment quod recuperet is enforeed by fi. fa. or such other process as the law allows for the recovery of debts. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  58. If the defendant charged as bailiff is found in surplusage, no judgment oan be entered thereon to recover the amount so found in his favor against the plaintiff, but as the auditors are judges of record, he may bring an action of debt, or by some authorities a sci. fac. against the plaintiff, whereon he may have judgment and execution against the plaintiff. See Palm. 512; 2 Bulst. 277-8; 1 Leon. 219; 3 Keble Rep. 362; 1 Roll. Ab. 599, pl. 11; Bro. Ab. Acc. 62; 1 Roll. Rep. 87. See Bailiff, in account render. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  59. In those states where they have courts of chancery, this action is nearly superseded by the better remedy which is given by a bill in equity, by which the complainant can elicit a discovery of the acts from the defendant under his oath, instead of relying merely on the evidence he may be able to produce. 9 John. R. 470; 1 Paige, R. 41; 2 Caines' Cas. Err. 38, 62; 1 J. J. Marsh. R. 82; Cooke, R. 420; 1 Yerg. R. 360; 2 John. Ch. R. 424; 10 John. R. 587; 2 Rand. R. 449; 1 Hen. & M9; 2 M'Cord's Ch. R. 469; 2 Leigh's R. 6. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  60. Courts of equity have concurrent jurisdiction in matters of account with courts of law, and sometimes exclusive jurisdiction at least in some respects: For example; if a plaintiff be entitled to an account, a court of equity will restrain the defendant from proceeding in a claim, the correctness of which cannot be ascertained until the account be taken; but not where the subject is a matter of set-off. 1 Sch. & Lef. 309; Eden on Injunct. 23, 24. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  61. When an account has voluntarily been stated between parties, an action of assumpsit may be maintained thereon. 3 Bl. Com. 162; 8 Com. Dig. 7; 1 Com. Dig. 180; 2 Ib. 468; 1 Vin. Ab. 135; Bac. Ab. h. t.; Doct. Pl. 26; Yelv. 202; 1 Supp. to Ves. Jr, 117; 2 Ib. 48, 136. Vide 1 Binn. R. 191; 4 Dall. R. 434; Whart. Dig. h. t. ; 3 Wils. 73, 94; 8 D.& R. 596; Bull. N. P. 128; 5 Taunt. 431; U. S. Dig. h. t.; 2 Greenl. Ev. 34-39. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  62. Practice. A statement of the receipts and payments of an executor, administrator, or other trustee, of the estate confided to him. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  63. Every one who administers the affairs of another is required at the end of his administration to render an account of his management of the same. Trustees of every description can, in general, be compelled by courts of chancery to settle accounts, or otherwise fully execute their trusts. Where there are no courts of chancery, the courts of common law are usually invested with power for the same purposes by acts of legislation. When a party has had the property of another as his agent, he may be compelled at common law to account by an action of account render. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  64. An account is also the statement of two merchants or others who have dealt together, showing the debits and credits between them. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  65. ACCOUNT (through O. Fr. acont, Late Lat. comptum, computare, to calculate), counting, reckoning, especially of moneys paid and received, hence a statement made as to the receipt and payment of moneys; also any statement as to acts or conduct, or quite simply any narrative report of events, &c. A further sense-development is that of esteem, consideration.As a stock-exchange term “account” is used in several senses. (1) The periodical settlements occurring, in London, monthly for British government and a few other first-class securities, and fortnightly for all others. The settlement extends over four days in mining shares and three days in other securities. The first day is the carry-over, “contango,” or making-up, day, on which speculative commitments are carried over, or continued: that is, the bulls, who have bought stock for the rise, arrange the rate of interest that they have to give on their stock to a moneylender, or bear, who will pay for it or take it in for them; and the bears, who have sold for the fall, arrange the rate that they receive from the bulls or, if the stock is scarce and oversold, the backwardation or rate that they have to pay to holders of the stock who will lend it them to enable them to complete their bargains. On the second day, called ticket-day or name day, a ticket giving the name and address of the ultimate buyer and the firm which will pay for the stock is passed through the various intermediaries to the ultimate seller, so that the actual transfer of the stock can be made directly. In the mining market the passing of names takes two days. On the last day, account day, pay day or settling day, cheques are paid to meet speculative differences, or against the delivering of stock. (2) The period between two settlements. A nineteen-day account is one in which nineteen days elapse between one pay-day and another. (3) The volume or condition of commitments. A speculator is said to have a large account open when he has dealt heavily either for the rise or fall. A bull account exists in a stock or group of stocks when it or they have been bought for the rise by a large number of operators; in the contrary case, when there have been heavy sales for the fall, a bear account is developed. en.wikisource.org
  66. To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; with to. dictgcide_fs
  67. To render an account; to answer in judgment; with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities. dictgcide_fs
  68. To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty. dictgcide_fs
  69. ak-kownt', v.t. to reckon: to judge, value.--v.i. (with for) to give a reason: to give an account of money held in trust.--n. a counting: statement: value: sake: a reckoning as to money, as in phrases like, 'to render an account,' 'to settle an account,' 'to square accounts' with any one, &c.--adj. ACCOUNT'ABLE, liable to account, responsible (for, of the thing; to, of the person).--ns. ACCOUNT'ABLENESS, ACCOUNTABIL'ITY, liability to give account, responsibility to fulfil obligations.--adv. ACCOUNT'ABLY.--ns. ACCOUNT'ANCY, the office or work of an accountant; ACCOUNT'ANT, one who keeps, or is skilled in, accounts; ACCOUNT'ANTSHIP, the employment of an accountant; ACCOUNT'-BOOK, a book in which accounts are kept.--ACCOUNT CURRENT, or open account, a course of business dealings still going on between two persons, or a person and a bank.--FOR ACCOUNT OF, on behalf of; FOR THE ACCOUNT, for settlement on the regular fortnightly or monthly settling-day, instead of for cash (of sales on the Stock Exchange).--IN ACCOUNT WITH, in business relations requiring the keeping of an account with some one.--ON or TO ACCOUNT, an instalment or interim payment.--TO MAKE ACCOUNT OF, to set value upon; TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT, to take into consideration; TO TAKE NO ACCOUNT OF, to overlook. [O. Fr. acconter--L. ad, to, comput[=a]re, to reckon. See COMPUTE, COUNT.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  70. Consider, regard as, (followed by obj. & complement or infin.; a. him a hero, wise, to be guilty). Be accounted of, be esteemed (alw. w. little, much, &c.). Account for: give reckoning (of money held in trust); answer for (conduct, performance of duty); explain the cause of; serve as explanation of (that accounts for it); (sport) be responsible for the death of, kill. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  71. (1) Counting, calculation, in phrr. cast accounts (reckon up), money of a. (names not of coins, but of sums, as guinea). (2) Reckoning of debit and credit, in money or service. Statement of money received and expended, with balance; so open or close an a. with, render or send in, pay or settle, an a.; a. current (whence a/c =account), one kept going w. occasional entries; joint a., in which two persons not otherwise partners count as one; keep aa., enter all expenditure for comparison w. income; balance or square aa. with some one, receive or pay the balance due; cash, profit-and-loss, &c., a., headings of subdivision in ledger; sale for the a., on the Stock Exch., not for cash, but payable at next periodic settlement; A in a. with B, having credit relations with; for a. of, to be sold for (person); on a., as interim payment; on one\'s a., for his service; on one\'s own a., for and at one\'s own purposes and risk, whence generally on a. of, because of, and on no a., by no means, certainly not. A favourable result of the reckoning, profit; find one\'s a. in, profit by, turn to a., make useful. Statement of administration as required by creditor; ask, demand, yield, render, an a., call or bring to a.; extended from money to conduct generally, so the great a., Day of Judgment, gone to his a., dead; give a. of, find cause of, explain, (in sport) give a good a. of, dispose of (opponents, game) successfully. (3) Estimation. Person or thing of, or held in, some or no a.; make little a. of; take into, leave out of, a.; take a. of; lay one\'s a. with, include in one\'s calculations, expect. (4) Narration, report, description, of event, person, &c. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  72. n. A reckoning, enumeration, or record of some reckoning ;—a detached written or printed statement of debts and credits in pecuniary transactions ;—ft statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, &c., explanatory of some event ;—a statement of facts or transactions ; a relation, narra­tive, or description ;-,-an estimate or estimation;—importance ; value ; advantage ; profit. Cabinet Dictionary
  73. A computation of debts or expenses; the state or result of a computation; value or estimation; a narrative, relation; the relation and reasons of a transaction given to a person in authority; explanation, alignment of causes. Complete Dictionary

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