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Definitions of acid

  1. harsh or corrosive in tone; "an acerbic tone piercing otherwise flowery prose"; "a barrage of acid comments"; "her acrid remarks make her many enemies"; "bitter words"; "blistering criticism"; "caustic jokes about political assassination, talk-show hosts and medical ethics"; "a sulfurous denunciation" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. a powerful hallucinogenic drug Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (chemistry) containing acid; "an acid taste" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. street name for lysergic acid diethylamide Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. containing acid; "an acid taste" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. Sour, sharp, or biting to the taste; tart; having the taste of vinegar: as, acid fruits or liquors. Also fig.: Sour-tempered. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A sour substance. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. One of a class of compounds, generally but not always distinguished by their sour taste, solubility in water, and reddening of vegetable blue or violet colors. They are also characterized by the power of destroying the distinctive properties of alkalies or bases, combining with them to form salts, at the same time losing their own peculiar properties. They all contain hydrogen, united with a more negative element or radical, either alone, or more generally with oxygen, and take their names from this negative element or radical. Those which contain no oxygen are sometimes called hydracids in distinction from the others which are called oxygen acids or oxacids. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Sour, and sharp or biting to the taste, as vinegar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A sour substance, usually liquid; that which combines with a base to form a salt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. 1. A compound of an electronegative element or radical with hydrogen; it forms salts by replacing all or part of the hydrogen with an electropositive element or radical. An acid containing one displaceable atom of hydrogen in the molecule is called monobasic; one containing two such atoms, bibasic; and one containing more than two, polybasic. 2. In popular language, any chemical compound which has a sour taste. 3. Sour, sharp to the taste: 4. Relating to an acid; giving an acid reaction, turning a vegetable blue red. (For definitions of the different acids, see the adjectives or under acidum; the acids official in the U.S. and Br. Pharmacopeias are defined under acidum.). A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  13. A sour substance; very pungent; reddens litmus paper. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  14. Sharp: sour. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. A sour substance: (chem.) one of a class of substances, usually sour, which turn vegetable dyes to red, and combine with alkalies, metallic oxides, etc., to form salts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. A sour substance; that which unites with a base to form a salt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. Sharp to the taste, as vinegar; sour; of or like an acid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Any sour substance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A compound of hydrogen capable of uniting with a a bse to form a salt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Sour and sharp to the taste. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. A sour substance; a substance capable of uniting with salifiable bases and forming salts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. Something which causes sourness to the taste. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. Sour; sharp; biting to the taste. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. Of or pertaining to an acid; as, acid reaction. mso.anu.edu.au
  25. A solution with a ph below 7. It has a sour taste, releases hydorxyl, and makes litmus papers red. Strong acids are corrosive and weak ones are practically harmless. AKA mineral, inorganic, natural, and organic acids. thelawdictionary.org
  26. A mnemonic for the properties a transactionshould have to satisfy the Object Management GroupTransaction Service specifications. A transaction should beAtomic, its result should be Consistent, Isolated(independent of other transactions) and Durable (its effectshould be permanent).The Transaction Service specifications which part of theObject Services, an adjunct to the CORBA specifications. foldoc_fs
  27. as'id, adj. sharp: sour.--n. a sour substance: (chem.) one of a class of substances, usually sour, which turn vegetable blues to red, and combine with alkalies, metallic oxides, &c. to form salts.--adj. ACID'IFIABLE, capable of being converted into an acid.--ns. ACIDIFIC[=A]'TION; ACID'ITY, the quality of being acid or sour--also AC'IDNESS.--v.t. ACID'ULATE, to make slightly acid. [L. ac-[=e]re, to be sour--root ak, sharp.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. The French also use the term aigre, when referring to the voice, in the sense of sharp and shrill :-as une voix aigre, vox aspera. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  29. [Latin] Sour. na
  30. [Latin] Of, containing, pertaining to, or having the characters of an acid. na
  31. [Latin] Producing, or associated with the production of, acids or acidity, as A. fermentation. A. albumin, albumin modified by treatment with acids. See Albuminate. A. cells, see Delomorphous cells. A. dyspepsia, dyspersia caused by undue acidity of the gastric juice or a. fermentation of the food, and marked by sour eructations. A. elixir of Haller, A. sulphurous mixture, see Elixir. A. reaction, a reaction indicating acidity; an evidence of acidity such as is afforded by the power to turn blue litmus paper red. A. salt, see Salt. na
  32. [Latin] A substance consisting of an electro-negative element or radicle combined with one or more atoms of hydrogen which are replaceable by an electro-positive element or radicle. The electro-negative radicle which combines with the hydrogen to form an a. is called the A.radicle (although in oxyacids this term is sometimes applied to the radicle minus the oxygen is an Oxygen a. or Oxy-a. A’s are called Monobasic, Dibasic, Tribasic, and Tetrabasic, according as their molecule consists of one, two, three, or four replaceable atoms of hydrogen united to an a. radicle. Some a’s also contain one or more atoms of replaceable hydrogen in their radicle; such a’s are called Dihydric, Trihydric, or Tetrahydric according as the total number of replaceable hydrogen atoms in the whole molecule is two, three, or four. An inorganic (or Mineral) a. is one that contains no carbon; an Organic a. contains carbon, which is generally linked with the acid hydrogen by a double atom of oxygen (-CO.OH). The organic a’s include the Fatty a’s derived from the benzene series. A Sulphur a. or Thio-a. is on in which suplhur replaces oxygen in the a. radicle. A’s have usually a sour taste, turn litmus paper red (a. reaction), and neutralize alkalies, forming with them neutral salts. The arsenous, chromic, carbolic, and pyrogallic a’s of the pharmacopoeias are not true a’s. See also Acidum. na
  33. Sour; (Chem.) with the essential properties of an ACID So acidity n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. A sour substance; (Chem.) one of a class of substances that neutralize and are neutralized by alkalis, and are compounded of hydrogen and another element or elements, and of which the principal types are sour and turn vegetable blues to reds. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Sour. American pocket medical dictionary.
  36. A compound of an electronegative element with one or more hydrogen atoms which are replaceable by electropositive atoms. American pocket medical dictionary.
  37. A salt of hydrogen. The following properties are common to the most important acids: Solubility in water. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. A sour taste. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  39. The power of reddening most organic blue and violet coloring matters, and of restoring the original color of substances which have been altered by alkalies. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  40. The power of decomposing most carbonates, causing effervescence. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  41. The power of destroying the characteristic properties of alkalis more or less completely, at the same time losing their own distinguishing characters and forming alkaline salts. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  42. n. [Latin, French] A sour substance;—an electro-negative substance having the properties of combining with alkalies and alkaline oxides, and of reddening most blue vegetable colours, and usually with a strong, sharp taste. Cabinet Dictionary

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