Spellcheck.net

Definitions of acid

  1. a powerful hallucinogenic drug Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. A sour substance. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. A sour substance, usually liquid; that which combines with a base to form a salt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. A sour substance: (chem.) one of a class of substances, usually sour, which turn vegetable dyes to red, and combine with alkalies, metallic oxides, etc., to form salts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. A sour substance; that which unites with a base to form a salt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. Any sour substance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. A compound of hydrogen capable of uniting with a a bse to form a salt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. A sour substance; a substance capable of uniting with salifiable bases and forming salts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. Something which causes sourness to the taste. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. (chemistry) containing acid; "an acid taste" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. containing acid; "an acid taste" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. Sour, sharp, or biting to the taste; tart; having the taste of vinegar: as, acid fruits or liquors. Also fig.: Sour-tempered. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. One of a class of compounds, generally but not always distinguished by their sour taste, solubility in water, and reddening of vegetable blue or violet colors. They are also characterized by the power of destroying the distinctive properties of alkalies or bases, combining with them to form salts, at the same time losing their own peculiar properties. They all contain hydrogen, united with a more negative element or radical, either alone, or more generally with oxygen, and take their names from this negative element or radical. Those which contain no oxygen are sometimes called hydracids in distinction from the others which are called oxygen acids or oxacids. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Sour, and sharp or biting to the taste, as vinegar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Sharp: sour. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Sharp to the taste, as vinegar; sour; of or like an acid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Sour and sharp to the taste. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. Sour; sharp; biting to the taste. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for acid?

Usage examples for acid

  1. In fact, very delicate wings can scarcely be taken out quick enough, and need very little acid – Directions for Collecting and Preserving Insects by C. V. Riley
  2. The fruit, according to him, is about an inch and a half in diameter, and is intensely acid – Wild Apples by Henry David Thoreau
X