Spellcheck.net

Definitions of act

  1. be suitable for theatrical performance; "This scene acts well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. something that people do or cause to happen Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a subdivision of a play or opera or ballet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a manifestation of insincerity; "he put on quite an act for her benefit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind; "He acted the idiot"; "She plays deaf when the news are bad" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. discharge one's duties; "She acts as the chair"; "In what capacity are you acting?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. behave unnaturally or affectedly; "She's just acting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. be engaged in an activity, often for no particular purpose other than pleasure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. perform on a stage or theater; "She acts in this play"; "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"; "I played in `A Christmas Carol'" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. have an effect or outcome; often the one desired or expected; "The voting process doesn't work as well as people thought"; "How does your idea work in practice?"; "This method doesn't work"; "The breaks of my new car act quickly". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. That which is done or doing; the exercise of power, or the effect, of which power exerted is the cause; a performance; a deed. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The result of public deliberation; the decision or determination of a legislative body, council, court of justice, etc.; a decree, edit, law, judgment, resolve, award; as, an act of Parliament, or of Congress. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A formal solemn writing, expressing that something has been done. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A performance of part of a play; one of the principal divisions of a play or dramatic work in which a certain definite part of the action is completed. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A thesis maintained in public, in some English universities, by a candidate for a degree, or to show the proficiency of a student. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A state of reality or real existence as opposed to a possibility or possible existence. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Process of doing; action. In act, in the very doing; on the point of (doing). Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To move to action; to actuate; to animate. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To perform; to execute; to do. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To perform, as an actor; to represent dramatically on the stage. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To assume the office or character of; to play; to personate; as, to act the hero. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To feign or counterfeit; to simulate. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To exert power; to produce an effect; as, the stomach acts upon food. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To perform actions; to fulfill functions; to put forth energy; to move, as opposed to remaining at rest; to carry into effect a determination of the will. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To behave or conduct, as in morals, private duties, or public offices; to bear or deport one's self; as, we know not why he has acted so. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To perform on the stage; to represent a character. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A law. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A deed; that which is done; the process of doing; a decree, edict, or law; the judgment of a court; a formal writing; one of the principal divisions of a drama or play. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To perform or play, as on the stage; personate; feign. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To exert force or energy; to behave; to do; to perform on the stage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. To exert force or influence: to produce an effect: to behave one's self. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To perform: to imitate or play the part of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Something done or doing: an exploit: a law: a part of a play. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A deed; a law; a division of a drama. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To perform; to behave one's self; to play a part. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To perform; do; play; feign. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. To perform an act; behave; do; perform on the stage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. The exertion of power; something done; a deed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A section of a play or drama. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Action; performance; a deed; a state of reality, as opposed to possibility; a division of a play during which the action proceeds without interruption; a decree, edict, or law. A deed in writing, proving the truth of some transaction. In English universities, a thesis maintained in public by a candidate for a degree. At Oxford, the time when the masters and doctors complete their degrees; and which at Cambridge is called commencement. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To perform; to play the part of. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To be in action or motion; to exert power; to produce effects; to operate; to perform; to behave. To act up to, to be equal to in action. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. A deed; a doing; power exerted; an exploit; a decree or law. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To do; to exert power; to perform. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. Something done or not don intentionally by a person. AKA act of parliament or statute. thelawdictionary.org
  51. Civil law, contracts. A writing which states in a legal form that a thing has been said, done, or agreed. In Latin, Instrumentum. Merl. Rep. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. In the legal sense, this word may be used to signify the result of a public deliberation, the decision of a prince, of a legislative body, of a council, court of justice, or a magistrate. Also, a decree, edict, law, judgment, resolve, award, determination. Also, an instrument in writing to verify facts, as act of assembly, act of congress, act of parliament, act and deed. See Webster's Dict. Acts are civil or criminal, lawful or unlawful, public or private. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  53. Public acts, usually denominated authentic, are those which have a public authority, and which have been made before public officers, are authorized by a public seal, have been made public by the authority of a magistrate, or which have been extracted and been properly authenticated from public records. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  54. Acts under private signature are those which have been made by private individuals, under their hands. An act of this kind does not acquire the force of an authentic act, by being registered in the office of a notary. 5 N. S. 693; 8 N. S. 568 ; 3 L. R. 419 ; 8 N. S. 396 ; 11 M. R. 243; unless it hasheen properly acknowledged before the officer, bythe parties to it. 5 N. S. 196. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  55. Private acts are those made by private persons, as registers in relation to their receipts and expenditures, schedules, acquittances, and the like. Nov. 73, c. 2 ; Code, lib. 7, tit. 32, 1. 6; lib. 4, t. 21; Dig. lib. 22, tit.. 4; Civ. Code of Louis. art. 2231 to 2254; Toull. Dr. Civ. Francais, tom. 8, p. 94. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  56. Evidence. The act of one of several conspirators, performed in pursuance of the common design, is evidence against all of them. An overt act of treason must be proved by two witnesses. See Overt. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  57. The terra. acts, includes written correspondence, and other papers relative to the design of the parties, but whether it includes unpublished writings upon abstract questions, though of a kindred nature, has been doubted, Foster's Rep. 198 ; 2 Stark. R. 116, 141. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  58. In cases of partnership it is a rule that the act or declaration of either partner, in furtherance of the common object of the association, is the act of all. 1 Pet. R. 371 5 B. & Ald. 267. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  59. And the acts. of an agent, in pursuance of his authority, will be binding on his principal. Greenl. Ev. 113. ACT, legislation. A statute or law made by a legislative body; as an act of congress is a law by the congress of the United States; an act of assembly is a law made by a legislative assembly. If an act of assembly expire or be repealed while a proceeding under it is in fieri or pending, the proceeding becomes abortive; as a prosecution for an offence, 7 Wheat. 552; or a proceeding under insolvent laws. 1 Bl. R. 451; Burr. 1456 ; 6 Cranch, 208 ; 9 Serg. & Rawle, 283. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  60. Acts are general or special; public or private. A general or public act is a universal rule which binds the whole community; of which the courts are bound to take notice ex officio. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  61. Explanatory acts should not be enlarged by equity Blood's case, Comb. 410; although such acts may be allowed to have a retrospective operation. Dupin, Notions de Droit, 145. 9. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  62. Private or special acts are rather exceptions, than rules; being those which operate only upon particular persons and private concerns; of these the courts are not bound to take notice, unless they are pleaded. Com. 85, 6; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 105. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  63. ACT (Lat. actus, actum), something done, primarily a voluntary deed or performance, though any accomplished fact is often included. The signification of the word varies according to the sense in which it is employed. It is often synonymous with “statute” (see Act of Parliament). It may also refer to the result of the vote or deliberation of any legislature, the decision of a court of justice or magistrate, in which sense records, decrees, sentences, reports, certificates, &c., are called acts.In law it means any instrument in writing, for declaring or justifying the truth of a bargain or transaction, as: “I deliver this as my act and deed.” The origin of the legal use of the word “act” is in the acta of the Roman magistrates or people, of their courts of law, or of the senate, meaning (1) what was done before the magistrates, the people or the senate; (2) the records of such public proceedings.In connexion with other words “act” is employed in many phrases, e.g. act of God, any event, such as the sudden, violent or overwhelming occurrence of natural forces, which cannot be foreseen or provided against. This is a good defence to a suit for non-performance of a contract. Act of honour denotes the acceptance by a third party of a protested bill of exchange for the honour of any party thereto. Act of grace denotes the granting of some special privilege.In universities, the presenting and publicly maintaining a thesis by a candidate for a degree, to show his proficiency, is an act. “The Act” at Oxford, up to 1856 when it was abolished, was the ceremony held early in July for this purpose, and the expressions “Act Sunday,” “Act Term” still survive.In dramatic literature, act signifies one of those parts into which a play is divided to mark the change of time or place, and to give a respite to the actors and to the audience. In Greek plays there are no separate acts, the unities being strictly observed, and the action being continuous from beginning to end. If the principal actors left the stage the chorus took up the argument, and contributed an integral part of the play, though chiefly in the form of comment upon the action. When necessary, another drama, which is etymologically the same as an act, carried on the history to a later time or in a different place, and thus we have the Greek trilogies or groups of three dramas, in which the same characters reappear. The Roman poets first adopted the division into acts, and suspended the stage business in the intervals between them. Their number was usually five, and the rule was at last laid down by Horace in the Ars Poetica—Neve minor, neu sit quinto productior actu Fabula, quae posci vult, et spectata reponi. “If you would have your play deserve success, Give it five acts complete, nor more nor less.” (Francis.)On the revival of letters this rule was almost universally observed by dramatists, and that there is an inherent convenience and fitness in the number five is evident from the fact that Shakespeare, who refused to be trammelled by merely arbitrary rules, adopts it in all his plays. Some critics have laid down rules as to the part each act should sustain in the development of the plot, but these are not essential, and are by no means universally recognized. In comedy the rule as to the number of acts has not been so strictly adhered to as in tragedy, a division into two acts or three acts being quite usual since the time of Molière, who first introduced it. It may be well to mention here Milton’s Samson Agonistes as a specimen in English literature of a dramatic work founded on a purely Greek model, in which, consequently, there is no division into acts.For “acting,” as the art and theory of dramatic representation (or histrionics, from Lat. histrio, an actor), see the article Drama. en.wikisource.org
  64. 1. Annual Change Traffic.2. Ada Core Technologies. foldoc_fs
  65. akt, v.i. to exert force or influence: to produce an effect: to behave one's self: to feign.--v.t. to perform: to imitate or play the part of.--n. something done or doing: an exploit: the very process of doing something: a law or decision of a prince or legislative body: an instrument in writing for verification: (theol.) something done once for all, in opposition to a work: a distinct section of a play: in universities, a public disputation or lecture maintained by a candidate for a degree.--n. ACT'ING, action: act of performing an assumed or a dramatic part: feigning.--adj. performing some duty temporarily, or for another.--n. ACT'OR, one who acts: a stage-player:--fem. ACT'RESS.--ACT OF GOD, a result of natural forces, unexpected and not preventable by human foresight.--IN ACT TO, on the very point of doing something.--TO ACT ON, to act in accordance with; TO ACT UP TO, to come up in practice to some expected standard: to fulfil. [L. ag[)e]re, actum; Gr. agein, to put in motion; Sans. aj, to drive.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. Actus, from actum, past participle of agere, 'to do,' 'a thing done.' The effective exercise of a power or faculty. The action of an agent. Acte is used by the French, to signify the public discussion, which occurs in supporting a thesis. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  67. Thing done, deed; process of doing, operation, as in the very a. of, A. of God (operation of uncontrollable natural forces); decree passed by a legislative body &c.; main division of a play; (in Universities) thesis maintained by a candidate for a degree &c. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Perform a play or part; personate (character in a play or in life), as a. Othello, a. the fool; perform actions, behave, as a. (behave) generously, a. (serve) as interpreter, a. upon (execute) a suggestion, a. up to (put into practice) a principle; perform special functions, as the policeman declined to a., the brake refused to a., alcohol acts on the brain. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. I deliver this as my a. and deed, formula used in giving legal assent to document; acting copy, text of play as it is to be performed, for actors\' use. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. In Rome, records of public proceedings, as Act populi, Senatus, etc., at one time published as a kind of newspaper. Hence, in later times, Philosophical " Transaction," Acts of Parliament, Fr. acte authentique ; and to keep an act, i.e. perform a public exercise, for a degree. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  71. Something done, a deed, an exploit, whether good or ill; a part of a play, during which the action proceeds without interruption; a degree of parliament. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for act?

X