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Definitions of affect

  1. connect closely and often incriminatingly; "This new ruling affects your business" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the conscious subjective aspect of feeling or emotion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. act physically on; have an effect upon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. make believe; "He feigned that he was ill"; "He shammed a headache" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. make believe with the intent to deceive; "He feigned that he was ill"; "He shammed a headache" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To act upon; to produce an effect or change upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To influence or move, as the feelings or passions; to touch. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To love; to regard with affection. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To show a fondness for; to like to use or practice; to choose; hence, to frequent habitually. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To dispose or incline. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To aim at; to aspire; to covet. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To tend to by affinity or disposition. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To make a show of; to put on a pretense of; to feign; to assume; as, to affect ignorance. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To assign; to appoint. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Affection; inclination; passion; feeling; disposition. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The emotional complex associated with an idea or mental state. In hysteria, the affect is sometimes entirely dissociated, sometimes transferred to another than the original idea. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves. Medical Dictionary DB
  20. To produce an effect upon; as, heat affects the body; to influence; to be fond of; to pretend. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Feeling (2); psychic trauma; the sum of an emotion. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  22. To act upon: to produce a change upon: to move the feelings. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To strive after: to make a show or pretence of: to love: (B.) to pay court to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To be inclined to: to prefer. (Obs.). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To move the feelings; to act upon; aim at; pretend. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To pretend; counterfeit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To act upon; influence; move emotionally. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To be fond of; love; haunt; frequent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To act upon; to produce an effect or change upon; to move or touch; to aim at; to be fond of; to love; to attempt to imitate in a manner not natural; to make a show or pretence of; to tend to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To act upon or influence in any way; to make a show of; to move or touch-as the passions. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To act upon ; influence; change ; enlarge or abridge. This word is often used in the sense of acting injuriously upon persons and things. Ryan v. Carter, 93 U. S. 84, 23 L. Ed. S07; Tyler v. Wells, 2 Mo. App. 538; Holland v. Dickerson, 41 Iowa, 373; United States v. Ortega, 11 Wheat. 467, 6 L. Ed. 521. thelawdictionary.org
  32. af-fekt', v.t. to act upon: to produce a change upon: to move the feelings: to assign, apply (only in pass.).--adj. AFFECT'ED, touched with a feeling either for or against (with by): full of affectation: feigned.--adv. AFFECT'EDLY.--n. AFFECT'EDNESS.--adj. AFFECT'ING, having power to move the passions: pathetic.--adv. AFFECT'INGLY. [L. affic[)e]re, affectum--ad, to, fac[)e]re, to do.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. af-fekt', v.t. to make a show or pretence of, to assume, to counterfeit or pretend to, to take upon one's self to: (obs.) to aim at, seek to obtain: (arch.) have a liking for, to love: to practise, wear, or frequent: to haunt or inhabit by preference.--n. AFFECT[=A]'TION, a striving after, or an attempt to assume, what is not natural or real: pretence. [L. affect[=a]re, freq. of affic[)e]re. See AFFECT above.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. Practise, use, as a. a costume; (of things) tend to assume (form, shape, &c.); assume (character), as a. the freethinker; pretend to have or feel (indifference &c.); pretend (to do). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Attack (as disease); move, touch, (in mind), whence affectingly adv.; produce (material) effect on; (pass., archaic) be assigned, allotted, (to particular service &c.). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. Partly synonymous with emotion; feeling reaction. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  37. Affection, passion, sensation. Complete Dictionary

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