Spellcheck.net

Definitions of age

  1. make older; "The death of his child aged him tremendously" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. how long something has existed; "it was replaced because of its age" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a historic period; "we live in a litigious age" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a time in life (usually defined in years) at which some particular qualification or power arises; "she was now of school age"; "tall for his eld" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a late time of life; "old age is not for sissies"; "he's showing his years"; "age hasn't slowed him down at all"; "a beard white with eld"; "on the brink of geezerhood" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a prolonged period of time; "we've known each other for ages"; "I haven't been there for years and years" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. begin to seem older; get older; "The death of his wife caused him to age fast" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. grow old or older; "She aged gracefully"; "we age every day--what a depressing thought!"; "Young men senesce" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind; lifetime. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. That part of the duration of a being or a thing which is between its beginning and any given time; as, what is the present age of a man, or of the earth? Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The latter part of life; an advanced period of life; seniority; state of being old. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. One of the stages of life; as, the age of infancy, of youth, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Mature age; especially, the time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities; as, to come of age; he (or she) is of age. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested; as, the age of consent; the age of discretion. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A particular period of time in history, as distinguished from others; as, the golden age, the age of Pericles. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A great period in the history of the Earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A century; the period of one hundred years. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The people who live at a particular period; hence, a generation. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A long time. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To grow aged; to become old; to show marks of age; as, he grew fat as he aged. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To cause to grow old; to impart the characteristics of age to; as, grief ages us. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. In poker, the right belonging to the player to the left of the dealer to pass the first round in betting, and then to come in last or stay out; also, the player holding this position; the eldest hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A particular period of time in life or in history; the length of time already lived; time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To grow old; to make old. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Period, beginning at birth and ending with death. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  27. The ordinary length of human life: the time during which a person or thing has lived or existed: mature years: legal maturity (at 21 years): a period of time: a generation of men: a century. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To grow old:-pr.p. aging; pa.p. aged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Period of life; period of time; generation; decline of life; legal maturity; a century. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To make, grow, or seem to grow old. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Period of life or existence; length of life already passed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The decline of life; the state of being old. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Legal majority; maturity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. An era; generation; century. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Forming collective nouns; as, baggage, leafage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Forming nouns of condition, office, service, or other relation or connection; as, drayage, pilgrimage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The period of time during which a person or thing exists or has existed; extreme verge of a long life; old people; time of life; maturity; majority; a historical period, or epoch; a generation; a century; a long time; a division of time. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To grow, or seem to grow, old. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A period of time; the whole life of man, or any particular part of it; a particular period of time. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. used to denote the period of a man's life ( Genesis 47:28 ), the maturity of life ( John 9:21 ), the latter end of life ( Job 11:17 ), a generation of the human race ( Job 8:8 ), and an indefinite period ( Ephesians 2:7 ; Ephesians 3:5 Ephesians 3:21 ; Colossians 1:26 ). Respect to be shown to the aged ( Leviticus 19:32 ). It is a blessing to communities when they have old men among them ( Isaiah 65:20 ; Zechariah 8:4 ). The aged supposed to excel in understanding ( Job 12:20 ; 15:10 ; Job 32:4 Job 32:9 ; 1 Kings 12:6 1 Kings 12:8 ). A full age the reward of piety ( Job 5:26 ; Genesis 15:15 ). biblestudytools.com
  41. Signifies those periods in the lives of persons of both sexes which enable them to do certain acts which, before they had arrived at those periods, they were prohibited from doing. The length of time during which a person has lived or a thing has existed. In the old books, "age" is commonly used to signify "full age;" that is, the age of twenty-one years. Litt. thelawdictionary.org
  42. The time when the law allows persons to do acts which, for want of years, they were prohibited from doing before. See Coop. Justin. 446. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  43. For males, before they arrive at fourteen years they are said not to be of discretion; at that age they may consent to marriage and choose a guardian. Twenty-one years is full age for all private purposes, and the may then exercise their rights as citizens by voting for public officers; and are eligible to all offices, unless otherwise provided for in the constitution. At 25, a man may be elected a representative in Congress; at 30, a senator; and at 35, he may be chosen president of the United States. He is liable to serve in the militia from 18 to 45. inclusive, unless exempted for some particular reason. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  44. As to females, at 12, they arrive at years of discretion and may consent to marriage; at 14, they may choose a guardian; and 21, as in males, is fun Age, when they may exercise all the rights which belong to their sex. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  45. In England no one can be chosen member of parliament till he has attained 21 years; nor be ordained a priest under the age of 24; nor made a bishop till he has completed his 30th year. The age of serving in the militia is from 16 to 45 years. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  46. By the laws of France many provisions are made in respect to age, among wbich are the following. To be a member of the legislative body, the person must have attained 40 years; 25, to be a judge of a tribunal de remiere instance; 27, to be its president, or to be judge or clerk of a cour royale ; 30, to be its president or procureur general; 25, to be a justice of the peace; 30, to be judge of a tribunal of commerce, and 35, to be its president; 25, to be a notary public; 21, to be a testamentary witness; 30, to be a juror. At 16, a minor may devise one half of his, property as if he were a major. A male cannot contract marriage till after the 18th year, nor a female before full 15 years. At 21, both males and females are capable to perform all the act's of civil life.. – Toull. Dr. Civ. Fr. Liv. 1, Intr. n. 188. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  47. In the civil law, the age of a man was divided as follows: namely, the infancy of males extended to the full accomplishment of the 14th year; at 14, he entered the age of puberty, and was said to have acquired full puberty at 18 years accomplished, and was major on completing his 25th year. A female was an infant – til 7 years; at 12, she entered puberty, and accquired full puberty at 14; she became of fall age on completing her 25th year. Lecons Elem. du Dr. Civ. Rom. 22.See Com. Dig. Baron and Feme, B 5, Dower, A, 3, Enfant, C 9, 10, 11, D 3, Pleader, 2 G 3, 2 W 22, 2 Y 8; Bac. Ab. Infancy and Age; 2 Vin. Ab. 131; Constitution of the United States; Domat. Lois Civ.tome 1, p. 10; Merlin, Repert. de Jurisp. mot Age; Ayl. Pand. 62; 1 Coke Inst. 78; 1 Bl. Com. 463. See Witness. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  48. AGE (Fr. âge, through late Lat. aetaticum, from aetas), a term used (1) of the divisions into which it is suggested that human history may be divided, whether regarded from the geological, cultural or moral aspects, e.g. the palaeolithic age, the bronze age, the dark ages; (2) of an historic epoch or generation; (3) of any period or stage in the physical life of a person, animal or thing; (4) of that time of life at which the law attributes full responsibility for his or her acts to the individual. (1) From the earliest times there would appear to have been the belief that the history of the earth and of mankind falls naturally into periods or ages. Classical mythology popularized the idea. Hesiod, for example, in his poem Works and Days, describes minutely five successive ages, during each of which the earth was peopled by an entirely distinct race. The first or golden race lived in perfect happiness on the fruits of the untilled earth, suffered from no bodily infirmity, passed away in a gentle sleep, and became after death guardian daemons of this world. The second or silver race was degenerate, and refusing to worship the immortal gods, was buried by Jove in the earth. The third or brazen race, still more degraded, was warlike and cruel, and perished at last by internal violence. The fourth or heroic race was a marked advance upon the preceding, its members being the heroes or demi-gods who fought at Troy and Thebes, and who were rewarded after death by being permitted to reap thrice a year the free produce of the earth. The fifth or iron race, to which the poet supposes himself to belong, is the most degenerate of all, sunk so low in every vice that any new change must be for the better. Ovid, in his Metamorphoses, follows Hesiod exactly as to nomenclature and very closely as to substance. He makes the degeneracy continuous, however, by omitting the heroic race or age, which, as Grote points out, was probably introduced by Hesiod, not as part of his didactic plan, but from a desire to conciliate popular feeling by including in his poem the chief myths that were already current among the Greeks. Varro recognized three ages: (1) from the beginning of mankind to the Deluge, a quite indefinite period; (2) from the Deluge to the First Olympiad, called the Mythical Period; (3) from the First Olympiad to his own time, called the Historic Period. Lucretius divided man's history into three cultural periods: (1) the Age of Stone; (2) the Age of Bronze; (3) the Age of Iron. He thus anticipated the conclusions of some of the greatest of modern archaeologists. (2) A definite period in history, distinguished by some special characteristic, such as great literary activity, is generally styled, with some appropriate epithet, an age. It is usual, for example, to speak of the Age of Pericles, the Augustan, the Elizabethan or the Victorian Ages; of the Age of the Crusades, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Age of Steam. Such isolated periods, with no continuity or necessary connexion of any kind, are obviously quite distinct from the ages or organically related periods into which philosophers have divided the whole course of human history. Auguste Comte, for instance, distinguishes three ages according to the state of knowledge in each, and he supposes that we are now entering upon the third of these. In the first age of his scheme knowledge is supernatural or fictitious; in the second it is metaphysical or abstract; in the third it is positive or scientific. Schemes somewhat similar have been proposed by other philosophers, chiefly of France and Germany, and seem to be regarded by them as essential to any complete science of history. (3) The subject of the duration of human and animal life does not fall within the scope of this article, and the reader is referred to Longevity. But the word "age" has been used by physiologists to express certain natural divisions in human development and decay. These are usually regarded as numbering five, viz. infancy, lasting to the seventh year; childhood to the fourteenth; youth to the twenty-first; adult life till fifty; and old age. (4) The division of human life into periods for legal purposes is naturally more sharp and definite than in physiology. It would be unscientific in the physiologist to name any precise year for the transition from one of his stages to another, inasmuch as that differs very considerably among different nations, and even to some extent among different individuals of the same nation. But the law must necessarily be fixed and uniform, and even where it professes to proceed according to nature, must be more precise than nature. The Roman law divided human life for its purposes into four chief periods, which had their subdivisions—(1) infantia, lasting till the close of the seventh year; (2) the period between infantia and pubertas, males becoming puberes at fourteen and females at twelve; (3) adolescentia, the period between puberty and majority; and (4) the period after the twenty-fifth year, when males became majores. The first period was one of total legal incapacity; in the second period a person could lawfully do certain specified acts, but only with the sanction of his tutor or guardian; in the third the restrictions were fewer, males being permitted to manage their own property, contract marriage and make a will; but majority was not reached until the age of twenty-five. By English law there are two great periods into which life is divided—infancy, which lasts in both sexes until the twenty-first year, and manhood or womanhood. The period of infancy, again, is divided into several stages, marked by the growing development both of rights and obligations. Thus at twelve years of age a male may take the oath of allegiance; at fourteen both sexes are held to have arrived at years of discretion, and may therefore choose guardians, give evidence and consent or disagree to a marriage. A female has the last privilege from the twelfth year, but the marriage cannot be celebrated until the majority of the parties without the consent of parents or guardians. At fourteen, too, both sexes are fully responsible to the criminal law. Between seven and fourteen there is responsibility only if the accused be proved doli capax, capable of discerning between right and wrong, the principle in that case being that malitia supplet aetatem. At twenty-one both males and females obtain their full legal rights, and become liable to all legal obligations. A seat in the British parliament may be taken at twenty-one. Certain professions, however, demand as a qualification in entrants a more advanced age than that of legal man. hood. In the Church of England a candidate for deacon's orders must be twenty-three (in the Roman Catholic Church, twenty-two) and for priest's orders twenty-four years of age; and no clergyman is eligible for a bishopric under thirty. In Scotland infancy is not a legal term. The time previous to majority, which, as in England, is reached by both sexes at twenty-one, is divided into two stages: pupilage lasts until the attainment of puberty, which the law fixes at fourteen in males and twelve in females; minority lasts from these ages respectively until twenty-one. Minority obviously corresponds in some degree to the English years of discretion, but a Scottish minor has more personal rights than an English infant in the last stage of his infancy, e.g he may dispose by will of movable property, make contracts, carry on trade, and, as a necessary consequence, is liable to be declared a bankrupt. In France the year of majority is twenty-one, and the nubile age eighteen for males and fifteen for females, with a restriction as to the consent of guardians. Age qualification for the chamber of deputies is twenty-five and for the senate forty years. In Germany, majority is reached at twenty-one, the nubile age is twenty for males and sixteen for females, subject to the consent of parents. Without the consent of parents, the age is twenty-five for males and twenty-four for females. The age qualification for the Reichstag is twenty-five. In Austria the age of majority is twenty-four, and the nubile age fourteen for either sex, subject to the consent of the parents. In Denmark, qualified majority is reached at eighteen and full majority at twenty-five. The nubile age is twenty for males and sixteen for females. In Spain, majority is reached at twenty-three; the nubile age is eighteen for males and sixteen for females. In Greece the age of majority is twenty-one, and the nubile age sixteen for males and fourteen for females. In Holland the age of majority is twenty-one, and the nubile age eighteen for males and sixteen for females. In Italy, majority is reached at twenty-one; the nubile age is eighteen for males and fifteen for females. In Switzerland the age of majority is twenty, and the nubile age is eighteen for males and sixteen for females. In the United States the age qualification for a president is thirty-five, for a senator thirty and for a representative twenty-five. en.wikisource.org
  49. the right belonging to the player to the left of the dealer to pass the first round in betting, and then to come in last or stay out; also, the player holding this position; the eldest hand. dictgcide_fs
  50. [=a]j, n. the ordinary length of human life: the time during which a person or thing has lived or existed: mature years: legal maturity (at 21 years), or time of life with regard to crime, contracts, marriage, &c.: a period of time: any great period of human history, as the Golden Age, the Bronze Age, the Middle Ages, or of individual history, as the age of infancy, the five--or seven--so-called ages of man: a generation of men: a century.--v.i. to grow old:--pr.p. [=a]g'ing; pa.p. [=a]g'ed.--adj. AGED ([=a]j'ed), advanced in age: having a certain age.--n.pl. old people.--n. AGEDNESS ([=a]j'ed-nes), condition of being aged or old.--adjs. AGE'LESS; AGE'LONG. [O. Fr. edage (Fr. âge)--L. ætas = ævitas--L. ævum, age; cog. with EVER.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. Period of life. Time that has elapsed since birth, &c. Five ages are often designated in the life of man: 1. First infancy (Infan'tia;) 2. Second infancy (Pueri"tia;) 3. Adolescence (Adolescen'tia;) 4. The adult age (Viril'itas;) 5. Old age, (Old Eng.) Elth, (Senec'tus.) Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  52. Length of life or of existence; Moon\'s a., time elapsed since new moon; duration of life required for a purpose, as come of a., full a. (in Eng. Law, 21 years), a. of discretion (14), over a.; latter part of life, as peevishness of a.; a generation; BRAZEN &c. a.; (Hist., Geol.) great period, as Patriarchal A., Ice A.; (colloq.) long time, as waiting for aa. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. (Cause to) grow old. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. a. before honesty, allow precedence to your elders however marked their moral inferiority to yourself (said to children). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. n. [Latin] Whole duration of a being; - the latter part of life; - a certain period of life; marked by a difference of state; - period when a person is enabled by law to act for himself; - a particular period of time in history; - the people who live at that period - hence, a generation Cabinet Dictionary
  56. Any period of time attributed to something as the whole, or part of its duration; a succession or generation of men; the time in which any particular man, or race of men lived, as, the age of heroes; the space of a hundred years; the latter part of life, old age; in law, in a man the age of twenty-one years is the full age, a woman at twenty-one is able to alienate her lands. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for age?

X