Spellcheck.net

Definitions of all

  1. to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent; "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "It was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly' as in"a whole new idea") Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. quantifier; used with either mass or count nouns to indicate the whole number or amount of or every one of a class; "we sat up all night"; "ate all the food"; "all men are mortal"; "all parties are welcome" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Although; albeit. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or degree of; the whole; the whole number of; any whatever; every; as, all the wheat; all the land; all the year; all the strength; all happiness; all abundance; loss of all power; beyond all doubt; you will see us all (or all of us). Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Any. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Only; alone; nothing but. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.) Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The whole quantity of, as substance, duration, extent, amount, or degree; the whole number of, collectively, as individuals, particulars, or parts; every, as all kinds; any. used after a preposition or verb; as, free from all thought of danger. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. The whole; the whole quantity or amount; total; aggregate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. A whole; one's entire possessions. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Wholly; completely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. The whole of: every one of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. Wholly: completely: entirely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. The whole: everything. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. The whole of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. The whole; each and every person or thing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. Wholly; entirely; quite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. The whole number of: the whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or degree. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. The whole; everything. All but, almost. It is all one, quite the same. All the better, better by the whole difference. All in all, everything to one; as a whole; altogether. At all, in the least degree-used byway of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences. All along, throughout. All in the wind, too close to the wind, so that the sails shake in it only: wavering; uncertain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. In composition, enlarges or adds force to the meaning; thus "all-absorbing" means absorbing or engrossing to the exclusion of everything else. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. The whole; every one. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. The whole number; the entire thing. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. Wholly; when used in union with other words, all generally denotes wholly, completely, or perfectly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. Collectively, this term designates the whole number of particulars, individuals, or separate items; distributively. it may be equivalent to "each" or "every." State v. Maine Cent. R. Co., 66 Me. 510; Sherburne v. Sischo, 143 Mass. 442, 9 N. E. 797. thelawdictionary.org
  27. awl, adj. the whole of: every one of: any whatever.--adv. wholly: completely: entirely: (Shak.) only, alone.--n. the whole: everything: the totality of things--the universe.--n. ALL'-FATH'ER, God.--ALL (obs.), entirely, altogether, as in 'all to-brake' (Judges, ix. 53). The prefix to- originally belonged to the verb (tó brecan), but as verbs with this prefix were rarely used without all, the fact was forgotten, and the to was erroneously regarded as belonging to the all. Hence came into use all-to = wholly, utterly; ALL BUT, everything short of, almost; ALL IN ALL, all things in all respects, all or everything together-- (adverbially) altogether; ALL OVER, thoroughly, entirely; ALL OVER WITH, finished, done with (also coll., ALL UP with); ALL RIGHT, a colloquial phrase expressing assent or approbation; ALL'S ONE, it is just the same; ALL TO ONE (obs.), altogether.--AFTER ALL, when everything has been considered, nevertheless; AND ALL, and everything else; AND ALL THAT, and all the rest of it, et cetera; AT ALL, in the least degree or to the least extent.--FOR ALL, notwithstanding; FOR GOOD AND ALL, finally.--ONCE FOR ALL, once only. [A.S. all, eal; Ger. all, Gael. uile, W. oll.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. (1) (adj. w. noun &c. expressed or understood). The entire, as a. day, a. England, a. his life, a. this, take it a., a. whom I saw; the greatest possible, as a. speed; (w. pl.) the entire number of, as a. men, a. the others; a. kind of, every kind of; any whatever, as renounce a. connexion. (2) (n.). All men, as a. are agreed; (w. of) the whole, every one, as a. of it, a. of you; everything, as that is a., a. is lost; one\'s whole property, as he lost his a.; a. but, everything short of (used adv.), as a. but impossible, he was a. but drowned; a. in a., of paramount or exclusive importance; at a., in any way, as not at a., did you speak at a.? (not in affirmative sent.); in a., in total number; one and a., a. and some (archaic), a. and sundry, a. individually and collectively. (3) (adv.). Wholly, quite, as dressed a. (orig. an adj.) in white, a. covered with mud, a. right, a. the better, a. the same, a. at once, a. too soon. (4) Combb.: A. -father, Odin, God; A. Fools\' Day, first of April; A. Saints\' Day, general celebration of saints, November 1st; A. Souls\' Day, day of supplication for souls of faithful deceased, Nov. 2nd. All is prefixed to many adjj., as a.-bountiful, a.-righteous, a.-sufficient, and esp. to partt., as a.-sufficing, a.-seeing, a.-knowing. [old high German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  29. = (in some senses, as shown below) a. the same; a. there, sane, in one\'s senses, (chiefly in neg. or interrog. context: is he a. there?; not quite a. there); a. the same, just the same, without any difference or any that matters, (it\'s a. the same, or a. one, to me whether he goes or not; if it\'s a. the same to you, if you don\'t mind; a. one usu. only in affirmative context), in spite of this, notwithstanding, however, (was punished a. the same, in spite of extenuating circumstances &c.; a. the same, I wish you hadn\'t done it). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. adv. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely. Cabinet Dictionary
  31. n. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the aggregate. Cabinet Dictionary
  32. The whole number; every one; the whole quantity, every part. Complete Dictionary
  33. Quite, completely; altogether, wholly. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for all?

X