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Definitions of anchor

  1. To cast anchor; to stop or rest on. To cast anchor, to drop it. To weigh anchor, to raise it. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To secure by an anchor; come to anchor; lie at anchor; fix; fasten. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To place at anchor; to secure by an anchor; as, to anchor a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To secure a vessel by a heavy iron implement lowered into the water; grapple; hold fast. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To fix by an anchor: to fasten. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To fix by an anchor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To cast anchor; to come to anchor; as, our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To cast anchor: to stop, or rest on. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To cast an anchor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To fix by an anchor or firmly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To stop at; to fix or rest on. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain), and which, being cast overboard, lays hold of the earth by a fluke or hook and thus retains the ship in a particular station. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Any instrument or contrivance serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a contrivance to hold the end of a bridge cable, or other similar part; a contrivance used by founders to hold the core of a mold in place. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Fig.: That which gives stability or security; that on which we place dependence for safety. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. An emblem of hope. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges; also, one of the calcareous spinules of certain Holothurians, as in species of Synapta. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. An anchoret. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Carved work, somewhat resembling an anchor or arrowhead; - a part of the ornaments of certain moldings. It is seen in the echinus, or egg-and-anchor (called also egg-and-dart, egg-and-tongue) ornament. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A heavy iron implement for securing a vessel to the ground under water; that on which dependence is placed for security or stablility; a metallic clamp securing a tie-rod connecting opposite walls to prevent bulging. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. A hooked iron instrument that holds a ship by sticking into the ground: (fig.) anything that gives stability or security. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. An iron instrument to hold a ship when afloat. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. A heavy iron implement dropped from a ship, and so constructed as to grapple the sea-bottom and hold her fast in the water; any firm security. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. An iron grappling instrument which, when dropped on the sea-bottom by means of a cable or chain, keeps a ship from drifting; any firm support. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. The anchor shaped spicule found in the skin of Holothurians. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for anchor?

Usage examples for anchor

  1. Let us try to hold by that as an anchor both sure and steadfast. – Mushrooms on the Moor by Frank Boreham
  2. When she turned a corner and caught sight of the bronze anchor over the door, she involuntarily slackened her pace, and at the same moment a policeman crossed the street, stood in front of her, and touched his cap. – At the Mercy of Tiberius by August Evans Wilson
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