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Definitions of angle

  1. move or proceed at an angle; "he angled his way into the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a biased way of looking at or presenting something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Saxons and Jutes to become Anglo-Saxons Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. fish with a hook Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. seek indirectly; "fish for compliments" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. to incline or bend from a vertical position; "She leaned over the banister" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. present with a bias; "He biased his presentation so as to please the share holders" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The figure made by. two lines which meet. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The difference of direction of two lines. In the lines meet, the point of meeting is the vertex of the angle. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To try to gain by some insinuating artifice; to allure. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A name given to four of the twelve astrological houses. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The figure formed by two lines or surfaces meeting; space between two lines which meet; a corner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To fish with a hook and line; to scheme; to use a bait. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. The meeting point of two lines or planes; the figure formed by the junction of two lines or planes; the space bounded on two sides by lines or planes which meet. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  21. Union of lines running in different directions. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  22. A corner: the point where two lines meet: (geom.) the inclination of two straight lines which meet, but are not in the same straight line. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. A hook or bend: a fishing-rod with line and hook. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To fish with an angle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To entice: to try to gain by some artifice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. A corner; point where two lines meet; inclination of two lines that meet. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. A rod and hook. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To fish with a hook. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To fish with rod, hook, and line; with for. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Angler. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. The figure, concept, or relation of two straight lines emanating from one point; a corner; point; inclination. See illus. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. A fish-hook; fishing-tackle; a fishing with hook and line. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A corner; the inclination of two straight lines at a point; a hook; a fishing-rod with a line and a hook. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To fish for; to entice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. Any corner, small or large; the point or corner where two lines meet; a hook to fish with. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To fish for anything. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. A name given to four of the twelve astrological [Obs.] Chaucer. dictgcide_fs
  38. ang'gl, n. a corner: the point where two lines meet: (geom.) the inclination of two straight lines which meet, but are not in the same straight line: any outlying corner or nook.--adj. ANG'ULAR, having an angle or corner: (fig.) stiff in manner: the opposite of easy or graceful: bony and lean in figure.--n. ANGULAR'ITY.--adj. ANG'ULATED, formed with angles. [Fr.--L. angulus; cog. with Gr. angkylos; both from root ank, to bend, seen also in ANCHOR, ANKLE.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. ang'gl, n. a hook or bend: a fishing-rod with line and hook.--v.i. to fish with an angle.--v.t. to entice: to try to gain by some artifice.--ns. ANG'LER, one who fishes with an angle: a voracious fish about three feet long, not uncommon on British shores, and called also the Fishing-frog, the Sea-devil, and by the Scotch, Wide-gab; ANG'LING, the art or practice of fishing with a rod and line. [A.S. angel, a hook, allied to ANCHOR.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. The space between two lines which meet in a point. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  41. Space between two meeting lines or planes; inclination of two lines to each other; ACUTE, OBTUSE, RIGHT, a.; corner; sharp projection; a.-iron, Latin-shaped piece of iron to strengthen frame work; a.-wise, angularly. Hence (-)angled a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Fish with hook and bait (for or abs.), lit. and fig. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. (Pl.) Low-German tribe settled in Northumbria, Mercia, and English Anglia. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. brothers of the a., anglers. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. Sharp bend formed by the meeting of two borders or surfaces. American pocket medical dictionary.
  46. The degree of divergence of two straight lines or two planes which meet each other or would meet if sufficiently projected. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  47. A corner, a point at which two or more edges or sides of an object or the walls or boundaries of a cavity or opening meet; an abrupt bend. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  48. [L.] The difference of direction of two intersecting straight lines. When the adjacent angles made by two such lines are equal, each angle is a Right Angle ; an Acute Angle is less, and an Obtuse Angle is greater, than a right angle. A Dihedral Angle is that contained by two intersecting planes ; a Solid Angle is the angular space at the vertex of a pyramid enclosed by three or more plane angles meeting at a point ; the Visual Angle of an object is the angle subtended at the eye by the line joining its two extreme points ; the Angle of repose is the Angle of friction (Friction). (For Angle of incidence, reflexion, refraction, traction, vide Reflexion ; Refraction; Traction.) Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  49. n. [Latin] The point where two lines meet or intersect ; a corner the difference of direction of two lines in the same plane that meet, or that would meet, if sufficiently extended ; or the difference of direction of two planes intersecting, or tending to intersect each other; —fishing tackle ; a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. Angle of incidence, the angle which a ray of light makes with a line drawn perpendicular to the point on which it falls. — Angle of refraction, the angle which a ray of light makes with a line drawn perpendicular to the refracting medium on which it falls. A right angle, one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90°, making the quarter of a circle.—An obtuse angle, one more than 90°.—An acute angle, one less than 90°.—A rectilineal angle, one formed by two right lines.—A curvilinear angle, one formed by two curved lines.—A mixed angle, one formed by a right line with a curved line.— Adjacent angles, such as have one leg common to both angles.—External angles, angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced.—Internal angles, those which are within any right-lined figure.—-Oblique angles, angles that are either acute or obtuse.—A solid angle, the angle produced by the meeting of three or more plans angles at one point.—A spherical angle, one made by the meeting of two arcs of great circles, which mutually out one another on the surface of the globe or sphere. — visual angle the angle formed by two rays of light, or two straight lines drawn from the extreme points of an. object to the centre of the eye. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. The space intercepted between two lines interfering each other. Complete Dictionary
  51. An instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line, and a hook. Complete Dictionary

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