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Definitions of arch

  1. (architecture) a masonry construction (usually curved) for spanning an opening and supporting the weight above it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a passageway under an arch Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a curved bony structure supporting or enclosing organs (especially arches of the feet) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a curved shape in the vertical plane that spans an opening Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescension Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. expert in skulduggery; "an arch criminal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (of persons) highest in rank or authority or office; "his arch rival"; "the boss man"; "the chief executive"; "head librarian"; "top administrators" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. form a curl, curve, or kink; "the cigar smoke curled up at the ceiling"; "The road curved" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. form an arch or curve; "her back arches"; "her hips curve nicely" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. (of persons) highest in rank or authority or office; "his arch rival" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Any part of a curved line. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Usually a curved member made up of separate wedge-shaped solids, with the joints between them disposed in the direction of the radii of the curve; used to support the wall or other weight above an opening. In this sense arches are segmental, round (i. e., semicircular), or pointed. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A flat arch is a member constructed of stones cut into wedges or other shapes so as to support each other without rising in a curve. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Any place covered by an arch; an archway; as, to pass into the arch of a bridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Any curvature in the form of an arch; as, the arch of the aorta. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To cover with an arch or arches. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To form or bend into the shape of an arch. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To form into an arch; to curve. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Chief; eminent; greatest; principal. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Cunning or sly; sportively mischievous; roguish; as, an arch look, word, lad. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A chief. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A prefix signifying chief, as in archbuilder, archfiend. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A structure of brick or masonry, the wedge-shaped part3 of which follow a curved line; usually forming the top of a door, window, or gateway; part of a curved line. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To cover with a curved structure; to bend or curve. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To form a bent or curved top or covering; curve. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Chief; of the first rank: used as a prefix; as, archbishop; cunning; mischievous; coy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. In anatomy, any vaulted or arch-like structure. See arcus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  28. Term applied to structures that are curved. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  29. A construction of stones or other materials, arranged in the line of a curve, so as by mutual pressure to support each other. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To cover with an arch: to bend into the form of an arch. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Cunning: sly: waggish: mirthful: shrewd. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. ARCHLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. ARCHNESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Used as a prefix: the first or chief. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Chief; principal (mostly used as prefix). The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. Part of a circle or curve; a curved, self-supporting structure. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. Playfully sly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To form an arch. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. Chief. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To form into an arch; form an arch; curve; span with an arch or arches. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Innocently cunning; roguish; playfully sly; coy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A bow like curve, structure, or object. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Arch. A curved structure supported at the sides or ends only, and formed of distinct pieces fitted together to span an opening. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Chief or principal; very great; extreme. In words beginning with the prefix arch-, the syllable arch- is pronounced arc-, before a vowel; as, archangel, before a consonant the pronunciatoin is arch-, as, archbishop, archduchess. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Crafty; shrewd; waggish; roguish; mischievous for sport. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. An arc; a curved structure of stone or brick, so arranged that the parts by mutual pressure support each other; any place covered with an arch; the vault of heaven, or the sky. Triumphal arch, an arch erected to adorn or commemorate a triumph. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To cover with an arch; to form into a curve. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To make an arch or arches. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. Chief; of the first class; used as a prefix to words from the Greek. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. The circular part of any building; the hollow or concave part of a bridge or gateway. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. To cover with an arch; to form an arch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. Waggish; mirthful. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. Chief of the first class. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. an architectural term found only in Ezekiel 40:16 Ezekiel 40:21 Ezekiel 40:22 Ezekiel 40:26 Ezekiel 40:29 . There is no absolute proof that the Israelites employed arches in their buildings. The arch was employed in the building of the pyramids of Egypt. The oldest existing arch is at Thebes, and bears the date B.C. 1350. There are also still found the remains of an arch, known as Robinson's Arch, of the bridge connecting Zion and Moriah. (See TYROPOEON VALLEY .) biblestudytools.com
  55. ärch, n. a concave construction of stones or other materials, built or turned on a centering over an open space, so as by mutual pressure to support each other and sustain a superincumbent weight.--v.t. to cover with an arch: to bend into the form of an arch.--p.adj. ARCHED, made with an arch, or like an arch.--ns. ARCH'LET, a little arch; ARCH'WAY, an arched or vaulted passage, esp. that leading into a castle.--ARCHES, or COURT OF ARCHES, the ecclesiastical court of appeal for the province of Canterbury, formerly held at the church of St-Mary-le-Bow (or 'of the Arches'), from the arches that support its steeple. [O. Fr.,--L. arca, chest.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. ärch, adj. cunning: waggish: roguish: shrewd, now mostly of women and children.--adv. ARCH'LY.--n. ARCH'NESS. [Derived from the prefix arch-, in its use in words like arch-rogue, &c.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. ärch (ärk in archangel), adj. used as a prefix, now chiefly as an intensive in an odious sense: the first or chief.--ns. ARCH'-EN'EMY, a chief enemy: Satan--also ARCH'-FOE; ARCH'-FIEND, the supreme fiend: Satan; ARCH'-FL[=A]'MEN, a chief flamen or priest; ARCH-HE'RESY; ARCH'-HE'RETIC, a leader of heresy; ARCH'-MOCK' (Shak.), the height of mockery; ARCH'-P[=I]'RATE, a chief pirate; ARCH'-P[=O]'ET, a chief poet: (obs.) a poet-laureate; ARCH'-PREL'ATE, a chief prelate; ARCH'-PRIEST', a chief priest: in early times, a kind of vicar to the bishop--later, a rural dean: the title given to the superiors appointed by the Pope to govern the secular priests sent into England from the foreign seminaries during the period 1598-1621; ARCH'-TRAIT'OR, a chief traitor, sometimes applied esp. to the devil, or to Judas. [A.S. arce, ærce, through L. from Gr. archi, cog. with arch-ein, to begin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. [Latin] A structure having the shape of a bow, more or less rigid. The Bony arches are the Supra-orbital, formed by the prominent margin of the orbit, Nasal, formed by the nasal bones and nasal process of the superior maxilla; Zygomatic; Alveolar; Dental; Vertebral, including the arches formed both by the vertebrae and by the ribs (see,thermal a., Neural a.) ; Pubic, formed by the rami and bodies of the two pubic bones; and the arches of the Foot, formed by the bones of the tarsus. The Arches of fascia are the rural (or Femoral) and Deep Crural (see Crural). The Arterial arches are the a. of the Aorta the Carpal, the Superficial and Deep palmer, Plantar, and Tarsal. See Arteries, Table of. Arches of soft parts are those of the Palate, formed by the pillars of the fauces; of the Colon (= the transverse colon) ; of the Kidney, that portion of the cortex of the kidney between any single pyramid and the adjacent portion of the capsule; of Corti, formed by the external and internal rods of Corti. The Fetal (or Embryonic) arches are the Visceral (Posteral, Pharynigeal) arches, or cartilaginous curved segments on the anterior aspect of the embryo, comprising the Mandibular a. (from which are formed the upper and lower jaw, the malleus, incus,etc.), the Hyoid a. (which persists as the great cornua of the hyoid bone), and the Branchial arches (the upper of which remains as the body of the hyoid bone). Aortic arches are 5 pairs of arterial arches, one for each visceral a. The upper two disappear; the third forms the common, external, and internal carotid; the fourth on the left side forms the thoracic aorta, arch of the aorta, and the subclavian, on the right side the innominate and subclavian; and the fifth (Pulmonary a.) on the left side forms the pulmonary artery. na
  59. Curved structure, bearing weight or ornamental; curve; vault; archway, vaulted passage, arched entrance. Hence archwise adv. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Furnish with an arch; form into an arch; overarch, span; (intr.) form an arch. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. (sup. -est). Chief, pre-eminent, as a. rogue, knave, impostor, (but now usu. a.-); cunning, clever, innocently roguish, whence archly adv., archness n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. (-tsh, exc. in archangel), pref. =Greek arkhi-, arkh-, arkhe-, comb. form of arkhos chief cogn. w. arkho begin (old English erce-, arce-, old French arce-, later arche; whence German erz-, Dutch aarts); in mod. literary wds f. Greek archi- is used, as archdeacon but archidiaconal. Meaning: (1) in titles of office &c. \'chief, superior\', as archbishop, -duke, esp. in titles of Holy Roman or German empire, as -butler, -chamberlain; (2) \'pre-eminent, leading\', as-antiquary, -builder, -prophet, -wag; esp. \'extreme, worst\', as -buffoon, -knave, -liar; (3) rarely =\'first, original\', as -founder, -messenger; (4) of things, \'chief\', as -diocese. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. A structure of bow-like or curved outline. American pocket medical dictionary.
  64. The curved portion of any tissue or organ, or a curve made by a nerve or a vessel. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  65. [L.] In Building, a structure disposed in a bow-like form, the materials of which support each other by their mutual pressure. An arch described from a single centre is semicircular. If from two centres, each at the spring of the arch, it is equilateral. If the centres are without the spring, it is an acute-angled A. If they are within it, it is obtuse-angled. Arches of three and four centres are lower than arches described from two centres, and are used chiefly in the Later Continuous or Perpendicular work of this country. The Tudor arches are chiefly of this kind, A segmental A . is one, the curve of which is less, than a semicircle. A stilted A. is one which starts from a centre or centres placed above the capital. Foil arches are those which are foliated in outline without a rectilineal A. to cover them. Ogee arches are those which have their sides formed of two contrasted curves. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  66. n. A curve line or part of a circle; –any work in that form, or covered by an arch. Cabinet Dictionary
  67. Part of a circle, not more than the half; a building in form of a segment of a circle, used for bridges; vault of heaven; a chief. Complete Dictionary
  68. Chief, of the first class; waggish, mirthful. Complete Dictionary

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