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Definitions of arch

  1. To make an arch or arches. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To form into an arch; form an arch; curve; span with an arch or arches. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To cover with an arch or arches. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To form or bend into the shape of an arch. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To cover with a curved structure; to bend or curve. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To cover with an arch: to bend into the form of an arch. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To form into an arch; to curve. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To form a bent or curved top or covering; curve. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To cover with an arch; to form into a curve. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To cover with an arch; to form an arch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. Chief or principal; very great; extreme. In words beginning with the prefix arch-, the syllable arch- is pronounced arc-, before a vowel; as, archangel, before a consonant the pronunciatoin is arch-, as, archbishop, archduchess. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. a passageway under an arch Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a curved bony structure supporting or enclosing organs (especially arches of the feet) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a curved shape in the vertical plane that spans an opening Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. Any part of a curved line. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A flat arch is a member constructed of stones cut into wedges or other shapes so as to support each other without rising in a curve. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Any place covered by an arch; an archway; as, to pass into the arch of a bridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Any curvature in the form of an arch; as, the arch of the aorta. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A structure of brick or masonry, the wedge-shaped part3 of which follow a curved line; usually forming the top of a door, window, or gateway; part of a curved line. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. A construction of stones or other materials, arranged in the line of a curve, so as by mutual pressure to support each other. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. ARCHNESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Part of a circle or curve; a curved, self-supporting structure. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. A bow like curve, structure, or object. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Arch. A curved structure supported at the sides or ends only, and formed of distinct pieces fitted together to span an opening. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. An arc; a curved structure of stone or brick, so arranged that the parts by mutual pressure support each other; any place covered with an arch; the vault of heaven, or the sky. Triumphal arch, an arch erected to adorn or commemorate a triumph. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. The circular part of any building; the hollow or concave part of a bridge or gateway. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. ARCHLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. expert in skulduggery; "an arch criminal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. (of persons) highest in rank or authority or office; "his arch rival"; "the boss man"; "the chief executive"; "head librarian"; "top administrators" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. form an arch or curve; "her back arches"; "her hips curve nicely" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. (of persons) highest in rank or authority or office; "his arch rival" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. Usually a curved member made up of separate wedge-shaped solids, with the joints between them disposed in the direction of the radii of the curve; used to support the wall or other weight above an opening. In this sense arches are segmental, round (i. e., semicircular), or pointed. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Chief; eminent; greatest; principal. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Cunning or sly; sportively mischievous; roguish; as, an arch look, word, lad. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A prefix signifying chief, as in archbuilder, archfiend. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Chief; of the first rank: used as a prefix; as, archbishop; cunning; mischievous; coy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Cunning: sly: waggish: mirthful: shrewd. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Used as a prefix: the first or chief. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Chief; principal (mostly used as prefix). The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. Playfully sly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To form an arch. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. Chief. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Innocently cunning; roguish; playfully sly; coy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Crafty; shrewd; waggish; roguish; mischievous for sport. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Chief; of the first class; used as a prefix to words from the Greek. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. Chief of the first class. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for arch?

Usage examples for arch

  1. By that time the arch was doubtless completed, and the coin may well show what it was actually like. – Early Britain--Roman Britain by Edward Conybeare
  2. Mrs. Clarke gazed at the blush, and no doubt thoroughly understood it, but she did not smile, or look arch or full of feminine understanding. – In the Wilderness by Robert Hichens
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