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Definitions of art

  1. photographs or other visual representations in a printed publication; "the publisher was responsible for all the artwork in the book" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the products of human creativity; works of art collectively; "an art exhibition"; "a fine collection of art" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. The second person singular, indicative mode, present tense, of the substantive verb Be; but formed after the analogy of the plural are, with the ending -t, as in thou shalt, wilt, orig. an ending of the second person sing. pret. Cf. Be. Now used only in solemn or poetical style. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The employment of means to accomplish some desired end; the adaptation of things in the natural world to the uses of life; the application of knowledge or power to practical purposes. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A system of rules serving to facilitate the performance of certain actions; a system of principles and rules for attaining a desired end; method of doing well some special work; -- often contradistinguished from science or speculative principles; as, the art of building or engraving; the art of war; the art of navigation. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The systematic application of knowledge or skill in effecting a desired result. Also, an occupation or business requiring such knowledge or skill. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The application of skill to the production of the beautiful by imitation or design, or an occupation in which skill is so employed, as in painting and sculpture; one of the fine arts; as, he prefers art to literature. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Those branches of learning which are taught in the academical course of colleges; as, master of arts. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Learning; study; applied knowledge, science, or letters. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Skill, dexterity, or the power of performing certain actions, acquired by experience, study, or observation; knack; as, a man has the art of managing his business to advantage. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Skillful plan; device. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Cunning; artifice; craft. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The black art; magic. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The use of means to the accomplishment of some end; music, painting, sculpture, or literature, or the practice of one of them; practical skill; knack; cunning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Second pers. pres. indic. sing. of the verb be: used only in solemn or poetic style. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. 2d pers. sing. Of the present tense of the verb to be. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Practical skill guided by rules: the rules and methods of doing certain actions: a profession or trade: contrivance: skill: cunning: artifice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. 2d pers. sing. pres. tense of the verb to be. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Skill guided by rules; rules and method of doing; skill; cunning; a trade. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. 2d per. sing. pres. ind. of BE, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Skill in some practical work; dexterity; facility; a system of rules; as, the industrial or mechanical arts. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The embodiment of beautiful thought in artistic forms; also, the works thus produced, collectively; as, the esthetic or fine arts; also, artistic skill. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Craft; cunning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. An organized body of trained craftsmen; a gild. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. The employment of means to the accomplishment of some end, directed by knowledge and skill; a system of rules directive of the skill in the attainment of a certain end; the practice of a system directed to the production of a work of art, generally of fine art; practical skill; dexterity; cunning. See Arts. Art and part, the contriving and partaking in a criminal art, said to be an abridgment of artifex particeps. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. The second person singular, indicative mood, present tense, of the verb to be. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. The 2d sing. of the pres. tense of am. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. Anything done by human skill-the opposite of nature; knowledge applied to the uses of everyday life-the opposite of science; a trade; skill; cunning. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A principle put in practice and applied to some art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter. Earle v. Sawyer, 4 Mason, 1, Fed. Cas. No. 4,247. See Act Cong. July 8, 1870. In the law of patents, this term means a useful art or manufacture which is beneficial and which is described with exactness in its mode of operation. Such an art can be protected only in the mode and to the extent thus described. Smith v. Downing, 22 Fed. Cas. 511; Carnegie Steel Co. v. Cambria Iron Co. thelawdictionary.org
  32. The power of doing. something not taught by nature or instinct. Johnson. Eunomus defines art to be a collection of certain rules for doing anything in a set form. Dial. 2, p. 74. The Dictionaire des Sciences Medicales, h. v., defines it in nearly the same terms. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  33. The arts are divided into mechanical and liberal arts. The mechanical arts are those which require more bodily than mental labor; they are usually called trades, and those who pursue them are called artisans or mecbanics. The liberal are those which have for the sole or principal object, works of the mind, and those who are engaged in them are called artists. Pard. Dr. Com. n. 35. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  34. The act of Congress of July 4, 1836, s. 6, in describing the subjects of patents, uses the term art. The sense of this word in its usual acceptation is perhaps too comprehensive. The thing to be patented is not a mere elementary, principle, or intellectual discovery, but a principle put in practice, and applied to some art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter. 4 Mason, 1. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  35. Copper-plate printing on the back of a bank note, is an art for which a patent may be granted. 4 Wash. C. C. R. 9. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  36. A real-time functional language. It timestampseach data value when it was created.["Applicative Real-Time Programming", M. Broy, PROC IFIP 1983,N-H]. foldoc_fs
  37. A system of rules serving to facilitate the performance of certain actions; a system of principles and rules for attaining a desired end; method of doing well some special work; often contradistinguished from science or speculative principles; as, the art of building or engraving; the art of war; the art of navigation. dictgcide_fs
  38. ärt, 2d pers. sing. of the present tense of the verb To be. [A.S. eart.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. ärt, n. practical skill guided by rules: human skill as opposed to nature: skill as applied to subjects of taste, the fine arts--music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and poetry: (pl.) specially used of certain branches of learning to be acquired as necessary for pursuit of higher studies, or for the work of life, as in phrase 'faculty of arts, master of arts:' the rules and methods of doing certain actions: a profession, skilled trade, or craft: contrivance: cunning, artfulness, or address: artifice, special faculty of some kind acquired by practice, skill, dexterity, knack: special faculty of giving expression to æsthetic or artistic quality, as in art-furniture, &c., supposed, by the buyer, in this respect, to justify its price.--adj. ART'FUL, full of art: (arch.) dexterous, clever: cunning: produced by art.--adv. ART'FULLY.--n. ART'FULNESS.--adj. ART'LESS, simple: (rare) inartistic: guileless, unaffected.--adv. ART'LESSLY.--ns. ART'LESSNESS; ARTS'MAN, one who cultivates some practical knowledge: (arch.) a man skilled in arts or in learning.--n.pl. ART'-UN'IONS, associations having for their object the promotion of an interest in the fine arts.--ART AND PART, as in the phrase 'to be art and part in,' originally in legal expressions like 'to be concerned in either by art or part'--i.e. either by art in contriving or by part in actual execution; now loosely used in the sense of participating, sharing.--USEFUL ARTS as opposed to Fine arts, those in which the hands and body are more concerned than the mind.--SCIENCE and ART differ essentially in their aims--Science, in Mill's words, 'takes cognisance of a phenomenon, and endeavours to ascertain its law; Art proposes to itself an end, and looks out for means to effect it.' [L. ars, artis. See ARM.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Skill, esp. human skill as opposed to nature; skilful execution as an object in itself; skill applied to imitation and design, as in painting &c.; thing in which skill may be exercised; esp. (pl.) certain branches of learning serving as intellectual instruments for more advanced studies, as Bachelor, Master, of Aa., one who has obtained standard of proficiency in these; black a., magic; practical application of any science; industrial pursuit, craft; guild. company of craftsmen; fine aa., those in which mind and imagination are chiefly concerned; knack; cunning; stratagem; a. and (or) part, design and (or) execution, as be a. and part in (accessary in both respects). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. of artistic design &c. (chiefly in shop use: a. needlework, bookbinding, carpet, curtain, jug). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. n. [Latin, Greek] Employment of means to accomplish some desired end; application of knowledge, power, rules, or laws, to practical purposes–power of performing certain actions, acquired by experience, study or observation; –cunning; artifice. Cabinet Dictionary
  43. The power of doing something not taught by nature and instinct; a science, as the liberal arts; a trade; artfulness, skill, dexterity; cunning. Complete Dictionary

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