Spellcheck.net

Language:

English - United States Change

Enter your text below and click here to check the spelling

Definitions of associate

  1. To unite in, or to keep, company, implying intimacy; to join in association; to unite in action, or be affected by the action of a different part of the body. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To bring together; combine; connect in thought; have fellowship; unite; join. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To join with one, as a friend, companion, partner, or confederate; as, to associate others with us in business, or in an enterprise. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To join or connect; to combine in acting; as, particles of gold associated with other substances. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To connect or place together in thought. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To accompany; to keep company with. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To unite; join; as a companion, friend, or confederate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To join with, as a friend, or partner: to unite in the same body. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To join in company. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To unite in company; to keep company, implying intimacy; as, congenial minds are disposed to associate. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To unite in action, or to be affected by the action of a different part of the body. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To unite in company or action; to have fellowship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To keep company with: to combine or unite. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To keep company. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. keep company with; hang out with; "He associates with strange people"; "She affiliates with her colleagues" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. bring or come into association or action; "The churches consociated to fight their dissolution" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. To join in company, as a friend, companion, or confederate; to unite; to combine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To join in company as a friend or companion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. a degree granted by a two-year college on successful completion of the undergraduates course of studies Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a person who is frequently in the company of another; "drinking companions"; "comrades in arms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. A companion; one frequently in company with another, implying intimacy or equality; a mate; a fellow. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A partner in interest, as in business; or a confederate in a league. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. One connected with an association or institution without the full rights or privileges of a regular member; as, an associate of the Royal Academy. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Anything closely or usually connected with another; an concomitant. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A companion; a confederate; an ally; one belonging to a society or institution. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. One joined or connected with another: a companion, friend, partner, or ally. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A companion; partaker; partner. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. Associate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. A companion; colleague. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A concomitant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A companion; a partner; an ally. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. A companion; a partner. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. having partial rights and privileges or subordinate status; "an associate member"; "an associate professor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. Closely connected or joined with some other, as in interest, purpose, employment, or office; sharing responsibility or authority; as, an associate judge. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Admitted to some, but not to all, rights and privileges; as, an associate member. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Connected by habit or sympathy; as, associate motions, such as occur sympathetically, in consequence of preceding motions. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Joined in interest, object, or purpose; sharing office or employment, as a colleague or partner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. Joined or connected with. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Joined together; united; allied. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Joined in interest, purpose, or office; connected by habit or sympathy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

Usage examples for associate

  1. A young girl is allowed to associate freely with the most enlightened men. – The Complete Historical Romances of Georg Ebers by Georg Ebers
  2. He likewise began to associate freely with the more dangerous element of the criminal department of this hospital, quite likely with a view towards getting assistance for his escape. – Studies in Forensic Psychiatry by Bernard Glueck
X