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Definitions of back

  1. To move or go backward. Behind the back, when one Is not there, or not looking. To see the back of, to be rid of. To turn the back on, to turn coldly away from. To back the field, to bet against a particular horse that some one of all the other horses in the field will heat it. To back the oars, to pull the oars backwards so as to stay the motion of a boat. To back astern, to row the boat stern foremost To back up, to second or support. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To furnish with a back or backing; mount; support; wager on the successful outcome of; indorse; to cause to move backwards. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To put backward; get on the back of; stand at the back of; sustain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. To foree backward. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To stand; uphold; sustain; support. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To mount; ride. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To address or indorse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To get upon the back of; to mount. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To drive or force backward; to cause to retreat or recede; as, to back oxen. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To make a back for; to furnish with a back; as, to back books. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To adjoin behind; to be at the back of. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To write upon the back of; as, to back a letter; to indorse; as, to back a note or legal document. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To support; to maintain; to second or strengthen by aid or influence; as, to back a friend. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To move or go backward; as, the horse refuses to back. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To bet on the success of; - as, to back a race horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To change from one quarter to another by a course opposite to that of the sun; - used of the wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To stand still behind another dog which has pointed; - said of a dog. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To move or go backward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To go backward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. place a bet on; "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. be behind; approve of; "He plumped for the Labor Party"; "I backed Kennedy in 1960" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. To move rearward. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. To mount or get upon the back; to second or support; to sign or endorse, as a warrant or note of exchange; to put backward; to cause to retreat or recede; to furnish with a back; to bet in favour of. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To mount; to support; to put or move back. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. the position of a player on a football team who is stationed behind the line of scrimmage Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. the part of a garment that covers your back; "they pinned a `kick me' sign on his back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. the front and back covering of a book; "the book had a leather binding" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. the posterior part of a human (or animal) body from the neck to the end of the spine; "his back was nicely tanned" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord; "the fall broke his back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. the part of something that is furthest from the normal viewer; "he stood at the back of the stage"; "it was hidden in the rear of the store" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. (football) a person who plays in the backfield Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. A large shallow vat; a cistern, tub, or trough, used by brewers, distillers, dyers, picklers, gluemakers, and others, for mixing or cooling wort, holding water, hot glue, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A ferryboat. See Bac, 1. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. In human beings, the hinder part of the body, extending from the neck to the end of the spine; in other animals, that part of the body which corresponds most nearly to such part of a human being; as, the back of a horse, fish, or lobster. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. An extended upper part, as of a mountain or ridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The outward or upper part of a thing, as opposed to the inner or lower part; as, the back of the hand, the back of the foot, the back of a hand rail. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The part opposed to the front; the hinder or rear part of a thing; as, the back of a book; the back of an army; the back of a chimney. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. The part opposite to, or most remote from, that which fronts the speaker or actor; or the part out of sight, or not generally seen; as, the back of an island, of a hill, or of a village. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. The part of a cutting tool on the opposite side from its edge; as, the back of a knife, or of a saw. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A support or resource in reserve. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. The keel and keelson of a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. The upper part of a lode, or the roof of a horizontal underground passage. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. A garment for the back; hence, clothing. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. The hinder part of the body of man, or of other animals, from the neck to the end of the backbone; the whole region of the spine; that which is opposed to the front; the rear or hinder part of anything; the part of a book where it is sewed in binding; the part of a knife, etc., opposite to the cutting edge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. The hinder part of the body in man, and the upper part in beasts: the hinder part. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. The hinder part of the body in man, and the upper part in animals; the rear. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. The hinder part of the human body; the upper part of an animal; the part of anything, opposed to front; the part most remote from that which fronts the speaker or actor; the part of a cutting tool opposed to the edge; the upper part; the under part. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. The upper part in animals, and the hinder part in man; the rear; the part out of sight; a miners term for joints; that part of a mineral lode nearest the surface. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. A brewers vat or large open tub for containing beer; a ferry-boat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. in or to or toward a former location; "she went back to her parents' house" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  51. In, to, or toward, the rear; as, to stand back; to step back. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. To the place from which one came; to the place or person from which something is taken or derived; as, to go back for something left behind; to go back to one's native place; to put a book back after reading it. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. To a former state, condition, or station; as, to go back to private life; to go back to barbarism. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. (Of time) In times past; ago. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. Away from contact; by reverse movement. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. In concealment or reserve; in one's own possession; as, to keep back the truth; to keep back part of the money due to another. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. In a state of restraint or hindrance. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. In return, repayment, or requital. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. In withdrawal from a statement, promise, or undertaking; as, he took back0 the offensive words. Webster Dictionary DB
  60. In arrear; as, to be back in one's rent. Webster Dictionary DB
  61. To or toward the rear; to or toward a former place, state, condition, or time; in withdrawal; as, to take back hasty words; in reserve; as, to keep back part of the truth; in return; as, to pay back. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  62. To the place from which one came: to a former state or condition: behind: in return: again. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  63. In the rear; behind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. To or toward the rear; behind; backward; in return; again. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. To the place from which one came; to a former state, condition, or station; behind, not advancing, or not coming or bringing forward; towards times or things past; again; in return; away. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. To the place from whence one came; to a former state or condition; behind; not advancing again. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  67. of an earlier date; "back issues of the magazine" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  68. related to or located at the back; "the back yard"; "the back entrance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  69. strengthen by providing with a back or backing Wordnet Dictionary DB
  70. shift to a counterclockwise direction; "the wind backed" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  71. travel backward; "back into the driveway"; "The car backed up and hit the tree" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  72. cause to travel backward; "back the car into the parking spot" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  73. support financial backing for; "back this enterprise" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  74. give support or one's approval to; "I'll second that motion"; "I can't back this plan"; "endorse a new project" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  75. at or to or toward the back or rear; "he moved back"; "tripped when he stepped backward"; "she looked rearward out the window of the car" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  76. in repayment or retaliation; "we paid back everything we had borrowed"; "he hit me and I hit him back"; "I was kept in after school for talking back to the teacher" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  77. in or to or toward an original condition; "he went back to sleep" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  78. Being at the back or in the rear; distant; remote; as, the back door; back settlements. Webster Dictionary DB
  79. Being in arrear; overdue; as, back rent. Webster Dictionary DB
  80. Moving or operating backward; as, back action. Webster Dictionary DB
  81. Lying or being behind, or in the rear, as to time, situation, or direction; in a backward direction; in arrears; overdue; no longer current; as, the back numbers of a magazine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  82. Toward the rear; in an opposite direction. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  83. Remote or retired. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  84. In arrears; overdue; not paid; as, back pay. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  85. That lies beyond, or distant; returning backward. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  86. That is situated behind; previous. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for back

  1. Don't take her back – Star-Dust A Story of an American Girl by Fannie Hurst
  2. " We will look when we go back replied Uncle Robert. – Uncle Robert's Geography (Uncle Robert's Visit, V.3) by Francis W. Parker and Nellie Lathrop Helm
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