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Definitions of bag

  1. To swell like a full bag. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To put into a bag; capture or kill, as game. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To fill out like a bag; swell; bulge; sag. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To put into a bag; as, to bag hops. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To seize, capture, or entrap; as, to bag an army; to bag game. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To furnish or load with a bag or with a well filled bag. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To inclose in a bag; secure or capture, as game. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To put into a bag: to capture:-pr.p. bagging: pa.p. bagged'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To put into a bag. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To swell or hang down like a full bag; as, the skin bags from containing morbid matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To swell with arrogance. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To become pregnant. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To bulge; hang down like a bag. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To swell out like a bag. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. put into a bag; "The supermarket clerk bagged the groceries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To put into a bag; to distend; to shoot. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To put into a sack; to puff up or out. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. an activity that you like or at which you are superior; "chemistry is not my cup of tea"; "his bag now is learning to play golf"; "marriage was scarcely his dish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a flexible container with a single opening; "he stuffed his laundry into a large bag" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. place that runner must touch before scoring; "he scrambled to get back to the bag" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. an ugly or ill-tempered woman; "he was romancing the old bag for her money" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. the quantity of game taken in a particular period (usually by one person); "his bag included two deer" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the quantity that a bag will hold; "he ate a large bag of popcorn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. capture or kill, as in hunting; "bag a few pheasants" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. A sack or pouch, used for holding anything; as, a bag of meal or of money. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A sac, or dependent gland, in animal bodies, containing some fluid or other substance; as, the bag of poison in the mouth of some serpents; the bag of a cow. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A sort of silken purse formerly tied about men's hair behind, by way of ornament. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The quantity of game bagged. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A certain quantity of a commodity, such as it is customary to carry to market in a sack; as, a bag of pepper or hops; a bag of coffee. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A sack; a pouch; a wallet; that which is contained in a bag; a sac or receptacle in animal bodies, containing a fluid or other substance; a certain quantity of grain, etc., purchased "by the bag". The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A sack or pouch; the udder of a cow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. What a bag will hold; game bagged. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A sack; a pouch; a receptacle in animal bodies containing some secretion; a determinate quantity of a commodity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. A sack; a pouch; a purse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for bag?

Usage examples for bag

  1. The child looked up at him sadly and reproachfully, and answered,-" Making a bag for you to go beg- when you're as old as gran'daddy." – Stories and Legends of Travel and History, for Children by Grace Greenwood
  2. And because you suppose that I can carry a bag of flour, you suggest that I become Madame Plays's lover! – San-Cravate; or, The Messengers; Little Streams by Charles Paul de Kock
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