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Definitions of baggage

  1. a worthless or immoral woman Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a case used to carry belongings when traveling Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. The clothes, tents, utensils, and provisions of an army. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The trunks, valises, satchels, etc., which a traveler carries with him on a journey; luggage. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Purulent matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Trashy talk. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A man of bad character. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A woman of loose morals; a prostitute. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A romping, saucy girl. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The tents, clothing, utensils, etc., of an army; the trunks, packages, etc., of a traveler; luggage; a worthless person; usually, a worthless woman; jokingly, a saucy young woman. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. The tents, provisions, and other necessaries of an army: traveller's luggage. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A worthless woman: a saucy female. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. The luggage of an army; luggage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. The trunks, packages, etc., of a traveler; luggage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. An army's movable equipment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. The tents, utensils, and other necessaries of an army; the clothing and other conveniences of a traveller. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. A low worthless woman, a playful saucy female. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. All the articles necessary for an army; luggage; things required for a journey. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. In the law of carriers. This term comprises such articles of personal convenience or necessity as are usually carried by passengers for their personal use, and not merchandise or other valuables, although carried in the trunks of passengers, which are not designed for any such use, but for other purposes, such as a sale and the like. The term includes whatever the passenger takes with him for his personal use or convenience according to the habits or wants of the particular class to which he belongs, either with reference to the immediate necessities or ultimate purpose of the journey. Macrow v. Railway Co., L. R. 6 Q. B. 612; Bomar v. Maxwell, 9 Humph. (Tenn.) 621, 51 Am. Dec. 6S2; Railroad Co. v. Collins, 56 111. 217; Hawkins v. Hoffman, 6 Hill (N. Y.) 590, 41 Am. Dec. 767; Mauritz v. Railroad Co. (C. C.) 23 Fed. 771; Dexter v. Railroad Co., 42 N. Y. 326, 1 Am. Rep. 527; Story, Bailm. thelawdictionary.org
  20. Such articles as are carried by a traveller; luggage. Every thing which a passenger, carries, with him is not baggage. Large sums of money, for example, carried in a travelling trunk, will not be considered baggage, so as to render the carrier responsible. 9 Wend. R. 85. But a watch deposited in his trunk is part of his baggage. 10 Ohio R. 145. See, as to what is baggage, 6 Hill, R. 586 5 Rawle, 188, 189; 1 Pick. 50. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  21. In general a common carrier of passengers is responsible for baggage, if lost, though no distinct price be paid for transporting it, it being included in the passenger's fare. Id. The carrier's responsibility for the baggage begins as soon as it has been delivered to him, or to his servants, or to some other person authorized by him to receive it. Then the delivery is complete. The risk and responsibility of the carrier is at an end as soon as he has delivered the baggage to the owner or his agent; and if an offer to deliver it be made at a proper time, the carrier will be discharged from responsibility, us 'such yet, if the baggage remain in his custody afterwards, he will hold as, bailee, and be responsible for it according to the terms of such bailment ana, R. 92. Vide Common Carriers 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  22. By the act of congress of March 2, 1799, sect. 46, 1 Story's L. U. S. 612, it is declared that all wearing apparel and other personal baggage, &c., of persons who shall arrive in the United States, shall be free and exempted from duty. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  23. bag'[=a]j, n. the tents, provisions, and other necessaries of an army: (U.S.) traveller's luggage; a worthless woman: a saucy woman. [O. Fr. bagage--baguer, to bind up, from which we may infer all the meanings, without reference to Fr. bagasse, It. bagáscia, a strumpet.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Belongings with which one travels (now ousted exc. in United States by luggage); portable equipment of army; good-for-nothing woman (now only used playfully), saucy girl. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. [French] The tents, clothing, utensils, and other necessaries of an army ;-trunks, &c., which one carries with him on a journey ; luggage. Cabinet Dictionary
  26. n. A strumpet ;-a playful, saucy young woman. Cabinet Dictionary
  27. The furniture of an army; a worthless woman. Complete Dictionary

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