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Definitions of band

  1. bind or tie together, as with a band Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. something elongated that is worn around the body or one of the limbs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a strip or stripe of a contrasting color or material Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. put around something to hold it together Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. jewelry consisting of a circular band of a precious metal worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a stripe of contrasting color; "chromosomes exhibit characteristic bands" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a range of frequencies between two limits Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. instrumentalists not including string players Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a group of musicians playing popular music for dancing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a restraint put around something to hold it together Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to identify it (as in studies of bird migration) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (often set with jewels) worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger"; "he noted that she wore a wedding band" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. attach a ring to the foot of, in order to identify; "ring birds"; "band the geese to observe their migratory patterns" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. A fillet, strap, or any narrow ligament with which a thing is encircled, or fastened, or by which a number of things are tied, bound together, or confined; a fetter. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. In Gothic architecture, the molding, or suite of moldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A narrow strip of cloth or other material on any article of dress, to bind, strengthen, ornament, or complete it. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A company of persons united in any common design, especially a body of armed men. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A number of musicians who play together upon portable musical instruments, especially those making a loud sound, as certain wind instruments (trumpets, clarinets, etc.), and drums, or cymbals. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A space between elevated lines or ribs, as of the fruits of umbelliferous plants. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A stripe, streak, or other mark transverse to the axis of the body. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A belt or strap. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A bond Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Pledge; security. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To bind or tie with a band. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To mark with a band. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To unite in a troop, company, or confederacy. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To confederate for some common purpose; to unite; to conspire together. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To bandy; to drive away. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. imp. of Bind. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To associate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. That which binds together; that which connects; that which embraces, supports, or restrains; a strap, tie, shackle, or fetter; collar; a driving belt; a company of persons united by a common object; a body of soldiers; a body of musicians performing on wood and brass wind-instruments. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To unite in a troop, company, or confederacy; to mark with a band. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To unite for a common purpose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. 1. Any appliance or part of an apparatus that encircles or binds the body or a limb. 2. Any ribbon-shaped or cord-like anatomica structure that encircles or binds another structure or that connects two or more parts; fascia. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  40. That which binds together: a tie. A.S. bend, from bindan, to bind. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. A number of persons bound together for any common purpose: a body of musicians. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To bind together. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. That which binds; a company. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To bind; unite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To stripe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A bond; a flat flexible strip used for binding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A company, as of musicians. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Anything which binds together; a narrow strip of cloth for binding; a fillet; a tie; a chain; something worn about the neck, as a clergyman's band; any flat, low member or moulding, broad, but not deep; a belt for the transmission of power in a machine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. A body of armed men; a company of musical performers; a company of persons united in any common design. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To bind with a band; to unite in a tree, company, or confederacy; to bind with a band of a different colour from the charge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. That with which anythng is bound; a narrow strip of cloth or similar material for binding or swathing; a stripe or streak of different colour or material; a cord; a fillet; a tie:in arch., a low moulding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. To join or tie together. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. A company of men united for any common object or design; a body of soldiers; a body of musicians. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. To unite together in confederacy; to associate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. The "band of Roman soldiers" referred to in ( Matthew 27:27 ) and elsewhere was the tenth part of a legion. It was called a "cohort," and numbered 400 to 600 men. [See ARMY] biblestudytools.com
  56. In old Scotch law. A proclamation calling out a military force. thelawdictionary.org
  57. A number of musicians who play together upon portable musical instruments, especially those making a loud sound, as certain wind instruments (trumpets, clarinets, etc.), and drums, or cymbals; as, a high school's marching band. dictgcide_fs
  58. band, n. that by which loose things are held together: (fig.) a moral bond of restraint or of obligation: a tie or connecting piece: (pl.) shackles, bonds, fetters (B.): (arch.) an agreement or promise given: (arch.) security given: (Spens.) a pledge. [M. E. band, bond; A.S. bend, from bindan, to bind. See BIND.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  59. band, n. a strip of cloth, or the like, to bind round anything, as a hat-band, waist-band, &c.: a stripe crossing a surface distinguished by its colour or appearance: the neck-band or collar of a shirt, also the collar or ruff worn by both sexes in the 17th century (termed a falling-band later, when turned down over the shoulders): (pl.) the pair of linen strips hanging down in front from the collar, worn by some Protestant clergymen and by English barristers.--n. BAND'AGE, a strip or swathe of cloth used by surgeons to keep a part of the body at rest, to apply pressure, or to retain dressings or apparatus in position--the two chief varieties, the roller and the triangular handkerchief bandage: a piece of cloth used to blindfold the eyes.--v.t. to bind with such.--n. BAND'BOX, a light kind of box for holding bands, caps, millinery, &c.--p.adj. BAND'ED, fastened as with a band: striped with bands: leagued, allied.--ns. BAND'FISH, a name given to various kinds of fish with long, thin, flat bodies; BAND'SAW, an endless saw, consisting of a toothed steel belt; BAND'STER, one who binds the sheaves after the reapers. [M. E. bande--O. Fr. bande, of Teut. origin; cf. A.S. bindan; Ger. binde, a band, Eng. BIND.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  60. band, n. a number of persons bound together for any common purpose: a troop of conspirators, confederates, &c.: a body of musicians, the company of musicians attached to a particular regiment in the army: (Scot.) band = bond.--v.t. to bind together.--v.i. to associate, assemble, confederate.--ns. BAND'MASTER, the leader of a band of musicians; BANDS'MAN, a member of a band of musicians; BAND'-STAND, a platform for accommodating a band of musicians.--BAND OF HOPE, an association of young persons--often mere infants--pledged to lifelong abstinence from alcoholic drinks--first instituted about 1847. [Fr. bande, of Teut. origin; cf. BEND, BIND.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  61. band, v.t. (Spens.) to ban or banish. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  62. an obsolete pa.t. of BIND. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  63. (1) Thing that restrains, binds together, connects, or unites (chiefly archaic, now ousted by the orig. identical BOND); (book-binding) straps at back holding sheets together; b.-stone, one passing through dry-stone wall& binding it. (2) Flat strip of thin material; hoop round anything (of iron, elastic, &c.); strap forming part of a garment (shirt, dress, hat, &c.), (pl.) development of neckband or collar into two pendent strips (clerical, legal); reef-band, strip sewn on sail at eyelet holes for strength; (Mech.) belt connecting wheels; stripe of colour or distinguishable material on object; bandbox; of paper-covered chip or card board for millinery (orig. for clerical bb.; look as if one came out of bandbox, of extreme neatness); b.-saw, endless saw running over wheels; b.-wheel, worked by strap from another. (3) Organized company of armed men, robbers, persons with common object (B. of Hope, total abstinence association), musicians (esp. regimental b.; German b., any itinerant open-air musicians; bandmaster, conductor; bandstand, platform; bandsman, member of b.). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. Put a band on; mark with stripes; form into a league (usu. refl. or pass.). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  65. Any appliance or structure that encircles or constricts the body or a limb. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  66. Any ribbon-shaped or cordlike structure that constricts, binds, or connects two or more portions of the anatomy. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  67. A broad leather strap having its ends joined and passing over two wheels fixed on parallel shafts, to communicate the motion of the one to the other. The term is also applied to cords and other wrapping connectors. A band is sometimes called an Endless B. , and is either direct, when its straight parts are parallel, or crossed; a direct B. makes the wheels turn in the same, a crossed B. in opposite, directions. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  68. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A cord, tie, or fillet; any ligament with which a thing is tied, or fastened, or by which a number of things are confined together:-a broad, fiat, low molding;-means of union or connection; -a linen ornament, worn about the neck by clergymen ;-a company united in any common design, especially a body of armed men. Cabinet Dictionary
  69. A tye, a bandage; a chain by which any animal is kept in restraint; any union or connexion; any thing bound round another; a company or persons joined together; a particular kind of neckcloth worn chiefly by the clergy; in architecture, any flat low moulding, facia, face, or plinth. Complete Dictionary

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