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Definitions of bar

  1. expel, as if by official decree; "he was banished from his own country" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of preventing; "there was no bar against leaving" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a rigid piece of metal or wood; usually used as a fastening or obstruction of weapon; "there were bars in the windows to prevent escape" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an obstruction (usually metal) placed at the top of a goal; "it was an excellent kick but the ball hit the bar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a counter where you can obtain food or drink; "he bought a hot dog and a coke at the bar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (law) a railing that encloses the part of the courtroom where the judges and lawyers sit and the case is tried; "spectators were not allowed past the bar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (British) a heating element in an electric fire; "an electric fire with three bars" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a portable .30 caliber magazine-fed automatic rifle operated by gas pressure; used by United States troops in World Wars I and II and in the Korean War Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a block of solid substance (such as soap or wax); "a bar of chocolate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the body of individuals qualified to practice law in a particular jurisdiction; "he was admitted to the bar in New Jersey" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. (meteorology) a unit of pressure equal to a million dynes per square centimeter; "unfortunately some writers have used bar for one dyne per square centimeter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. prevent from entering; keep out; "He was barred from membership in the club" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. musical notation for a repeating pattern of musical beats; "the orchestra omitted the last twelve bars of the song" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the act of preventing; "there was no bar against leaving"; "money was allocated to study the cause and prevention of influenza" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. a rigid piece of metal or wood; usually used as a fastening or obstruction or weapon; "there were bars in the windows to prevent escape" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. a heating element in an electric fire; "an electric fire with three bars" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. a horizontal rod that serves as a support for gymnasts as they perform exercises Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. a portable .30 caliber magazine-fed automatic rifle operated by gas pressure; used by United States troops in World War I and in World War II and in the Korean War Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. a submerged (or partly submerged) ridge in a river or along a shore; "the boat ran aground on a submerged bar in the river" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. secure with, or as if with, bars; "He barred the door" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. A piece of wood, metal, or other material, long in proportion to its breadth or thickness, used as a lever and for various other purposes, but especially for a hindrance, obstruction, or fastening; as, the bars of a fence or gate; the bar of a door. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. An indefinite quantity of some substance, so shaped as to be long in proportion to its breadth and thickness; as, a bar of gold or of lead; a bar of soap. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Anything which obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an obstruction; a barrier. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A bank of sand, gravel, or other matter, esp. at the mouth of a river or harbor, obstructing navigation. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Any railing that divides a room, or office, or hall of assembly, in order to reserve a space for those having special privileges; as, the bar of the House of Commons. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in courts of justice. Hence, the phrase at the bar of the court signifies in open court. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The place in court where prisoners are stationed for arraignment, trial, or sentence. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The whole body of lawyers licensed in a court or district; the legal profession. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A special plea constituting a sufficient answer to plaintiff's action. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Any tribunal; as, the bar of public opinion; the bar of God. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A barrier or counter, over which liquors and food are passed to customers; hence, the portion of the room behind the counter where liquors for sale are kept. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. An ordinary, like a fess but narrower, occupying only one fifth part of the field. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A broad shaft, or band, or stripe; as, a bar of light; a bar of color. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A vertical line across the staff. Bars divide the staff into spaces which represent measures, and are themselves called measures. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The space between the tusks and grinders in the upper jaw of a horse, in which the bit is placed. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The part of the crust of a horse's hoof which is bent inwards towards the frog at the heel on each side, and extends into the center of the sole. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A drilling or tamping rod. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A vein or dike crossing a lode. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A gatehouse of a castle or fortified town. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A slender strip of wood which divides and supports the glass of a window; a sash bar. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To fasten with a bar; as, to bar a door or gate. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. To restrict or confine, as if by a bar; to hinder; to obstruct; to prevent; to prohibit; as, to bar the entrance of evil; distance bars our intercourse; the statute bars my right; the right is barred by time; a release bars the plaintiff's recovery; -- sometimes with up. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. To except; to exclude by exception. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. To cross with one or more stripes or lines. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A grooved pulley or sheave incased in a frame or shell which is provided with a hook, eye, or strap, by which it may be attached to an object. It is used to change the direction of motion, as in raising a heavy object that can not be conveniently reached, and also, when two or more such sheaves are compounded, to change the rate of motion, or to exert increased force; -- used especially in the rigging of ships, and in tackles. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. A stripe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A rigid piece of wood, metal, or other solid matter, long in proportion to its thickness; a quantity contained in such a shape; as, a bar of chocolate; a rail; a barrier; anything which impedes or obstructs; a bank of sand, gravel, etc., obstructing navigation at the entrance to a harbor or mouth of a river; the railing in closing the space occupied by counsel in courts of law; the place in court where prisoners are stationed for trial, or sentence; the profession of a lawyer; any tribunal, the portion of a hotel, etc., where liquors are served; a band or stripe; in a bridle, the mouthpiece connecting the checks; one of the upright lines drawn through the staff of a piece of music, dividing it into equal measures of time; the space and notes in closed by two such lines. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. To fasten with a bar; to hinder; to obstruct; to exclude; to close; to prohibit; to mark with bars. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. Barred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. Barring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. One of the two convergent ridges on the ground surface of the hoof of a horse, united by the frog, and fused with the sole in front; pars inflexa lateralis and pars inflexa medialis. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  53. Barye, a unit of pressure, representing one megadyne per square centimeter; as a unit of atmospheric pressure it is the equivalent of 29.53 mercury inches. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  54. A rod of any solid substance: a bolt: a hinderance or obstruction: a bank of sand or other matter at the mouth of a river: the railing that incloses a space in a tavern or in a court of law: any tribunal: the pleaders in a court as distinguished from the judges: a division in music. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. To fasten or secure, as with a bar: to hinder or exclude:-pr.p. barring; pa.p. barred'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. A rod; hindrance; movable rail in a fence; inclosed space in a tavern or court-room; a tribunal; division in music; bank in a river. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. To fasten with a bar; to hinder; to exclude. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. To close; obstruct; prohibit; except. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To mark with bars. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. A long, solid strip, as of wood or iron; rail; barrier; obstruction; a bank, as of sand in a harbor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. An enclosed place in a court-room; a court of justice; the legal profession. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. A courter where liquors are sold. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. The vertical line that divides a staff. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. A rod of wood, iron, or other solid substance, used as a lever, an axis, or an obstruction; a cross beam or bolt; a barrier for defence; a bank of sand, gravel, or earth, forming a shoal at the mouth of a river or harbour, obstructing entrance, or rendering it difficult; the railing that encloses the place which counsels occupy in courts of justice; the place in a court at which criminals stand during trial; those who plead at the bar; any tribunal, as, the bar of public opinion; the enclosed place of a tavern, inn, or coffee-house, where liquors are served out; anything laid across another, as stripes in colour, and the like; the highest part of the place in a horse's mouth between the grinders and tusks; an ordinary, consisting of the space included by two straight lines drawn across the escutcheon; a peremptory exception, sufficient to destroy the plaintiff's action; a line drawn perpendicularly across the lines of the staff, including between each two a certain quantity of time, or number of beats; an ingot, lump, or wedge, from the mines, run in a mould, and unwrought. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. To fasten with a bar; to obstruct; to exclude; to except; to cross with stripes of a different colour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. A bolt; a long piece or rod of any solid substance of small diameter; an enclosed place at an inn or a court; a division in music, or the line that makes the division; a sandbank at the entrance to a river; the body of lawyers that plead; any hindrance; a stop. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  67. To secure; to fasten; to hinder; to shut out; to restrain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  68. 1. A partition or railing running across a court-room, intended to separate the general public from the space occupied by the judges, counsel, jury, and others concerned in the trial of a cause. In the English courts it is the partition behind which all outer-bar risters and every member of the public must stand. Solicitors, being officers of the court, are admitted within it; as are also queen’s counsel, barristers with patents of precedence, and serjeants, in virtue of their ranks. Parties who appear in person also are placed within the bar on the floor of the court. 2. The term also designates a particular part of the court-room; for example, the place where prisoners stand at their trial, whence the expression “prisoner at the bar.” 3. It further denotes the presence, actual or constructive, of the court. Thus, a trial at bar is one had before the full court, distinguished from a trial had before a single judge at nisi prius. So the “case at bar” is the case now before the court and under its consideration ; the case being tried or argued. 4. In the practice of legislative bodies, the bar is the outer boundary of the house, and therefore all persons, not being members, who wish to address the house, or are summoned to it appear at the bar for that purpose. 5. In another sense, the whole body of attorneys and counselors, or the members of the legal profession, collectively, are figuratively called the “bar,” from the place which they usually occupy in court. They are thus distinguished from the “bench,” which term denotes the whole body of judges. 6. In the law of contracts, “bar” means an Impediment, an obstacle, or preventive barrier. Thus, relationship within the prohibited degrees is a bar to marriage. In this sense also we speak of the “bar of the statute of limitations.” 7. It further means that which defeats, annuls, cuts off, or puts an end to. Thus, a provision “in bar of dower” is one which has the effect of defeating or cutting off the dower-rights which the wife would otherwise become entitled to in the particular land. 8. In pleading, it denoted a special plea, constituting a sufficient answer to an action at law; and so called because it barred, i. e., prevented, the plaintiff from further prosecuting it with effect, and, if established by proof, defeated and destroyed the action altogether. Now called a special “plea in bar.” See PLEA IN BAB. thelawdictionary.org
  69. Actions. A perpetual destruction or temporary taking away of the action of the plaintiff. In ancient authors it is called exceptio peremptorid. Co. Litt. 303 b Steph. Pl. Appx. xxviii. Loisel (Institutes Coutumieres, vol. ii. p. 204) says, "Exceptions (in pleas) have been called bars by our ancient practitioners, because, being opposed, they arrest the party who has sued out the process, as in war (une barriere) a barrier arrests an enemy; and as there have always been in our tribunals bars to separate the advocates from the judges, the place where the advocates stand (pour parler) when they speak, has been called for that reason (barreau) the bar." 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  70. When a person is bound in any action, real or personal, by judgment on demurrer, confession or verdict, he is barred, i. e. debarred, as to that or any other action of the like nature or degree, for the same thing, forever; for expedit reipublicae ut sit finis litim. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  71. But there is a difference between real and personal actions. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  72. In personal actions, as in debt or account, the bar is perpetual, inasmuch as the plaintiff cannot have an action of a higher nature, and therefore in such actions he has generally no remedy, but by bringing a writ of error. Doct. Plac. 65; 6 Co. 7, 8 4 East, 507, 508. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  73. But if the defendant be barred in a real action, by judgment on a verdict, demurrer or confession, &c., he may still have an action of a higher nature, and try the same right again. Lawes, Pl. 39, 40. See generally, Bac. Ab. Abatement, N; Plea in bar. Also the case of Outram v. Morewood, 3 East, Rep. 346-366; a leading case on this subject. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  74. Practice. A place in a court where the counsellors and advocates stand to make their addresses to the court and jury; it is so called because formerly it was closed with a bar. Figuratively the counsellors and attorneys at law are called the bar of Philadelphia, the New York bar. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  75. A place in a court having criminal jurisdiction, to which prisoners are called to plead to the indictment, is also called, the bar. Vide Merl. Repert. mot Barreau, and Dupin, Profession d'Avocat, tom. i. p. 451, for some eloquent advice to gentlemen of the bar. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  76. Contracts. An obstacle or opposition. 2. Some bars arise from circumstances, and others from persons. Kindred within the prohibited degree, for example, is a bar to a marriage between the persons related; but the fact that A is married, and cannot therefore marry B, is a circumstance which operates as a bar as long as it subsists; for without it the parties might marry. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  77. 1. /bar/ The second metasyntacticvariable, after foo and before baz. E.g. "Supposefunction FOO calls functions BAR..."2. Often appended to foo to produce foobar. foldoc_fs
  78. To restrict or confine, as if by a bar; to hinder; to obstruct; to prevent; to prohibit; as, to bar the entrance of evil; distance bars our intercourse; the statute bars my right; the right is barred by time; a release bars the plaintiff's recovery; sometimes with up. dictgcide_fs
  79. bär, n. a rod of any solid substance: a bolt: a hindrance or obstruction--the barrier of a city or street, as the bars of York, Temple Bar, a toll-bar: a bank of sand or other matter at the mouth of a river: any terminus or limit (of life)--e.g. as in TO CROSS THE BAR: the railing that encloses a space in a tavern, the counter across which drinks are served, a public-house: the wooden rail dividing off the JUDGE'S SEAT, at which prisoners are placed for arraignment or sentence--hence, TO APPEAR AT THE BAR, TO PASS THE BAR = to be formally referred for trial from a lower court to a higher: any tribunal: the pleaders in a court as distinguished from the judges: a division in music.--v.t. to fasten or secure, as with a bar: to hinder or exclude:--pr.p. bar'ring; pa.p. barred.--ns. BAR'-[=I]'RON, iron in malleable bars; BAR'MAID, a female waiter at the bar of a tavern or hotel.--prep. BAR'RING, excepting, saving.--ns. BAR'RING-OUT, the shutting of the school-room doors and windows by the pupils against the master, in order to enforce assent to their demands; BAR'WOOD, a kind of red dye-wood imported from Africa in bars. [O. Fr. barre--Low L. barra, perh. of Celt. origin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  80. In the horse, the reflection of the wall of the hoof at the heel. na
  81. Long-shaped piece of rigid material (metal, wood, soap, &c.; b.-bell, iron b. with ball at each end used in gymnastics, cf. dumbbell; barwood, red wood from Gaboon imported in bb. for dyeing &c.); (medals) slip of silver below clasp as additional distinction; band of colour &c. on surface, (Herald.) two horizontal parallel lines across shield (b. sinister, by mistake for BEND or BATON, supposed sign of illegitimacy); rod or pole used to confine or obstruct (window, door, grate, gate, -b.); barrier of any shape (Temple-b., tollb.; harbour-b., of sand across mouth); (Mus.) vertical line across stave dividing piece into equal time-parts; immaterial barrier; (Law) plea arresting action or claim; moral obstacle. Barrier with some technical significance, as, in lawcourt, place at which prisoner stands; hence b. of conscience, opinion, &c.; trial at b., in King\'s-Bench division; a particular court (practise at parliamentary, Chancery, &c. b.); be called to the b. (i.e. that in Inns of Court separating benchers), be admitted a barrister; be called within the b. (i.e. that in courts within which K.C.s plead), be appointed King\'s Counsel; the b., barristers, profession of barrister; (Parl.) rail dividing off space to which non-members may be admitted on business; (inn &c.) counter across which refreshments are handed, space behind or room containing it; barman, barmaid, attendants at such counter. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  82. Fasten (door &c.) with bar (s); keep (person) in or out (barring-out, schoolboy rebellion); obstruct (path &c.); stay (process or party) by legal objection; exclude from consideration (esp. in imperative used as prep., e.g. bar one in betting); (slang) object to, dislike, (person, habit, &c.); mark with stripe (s). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  83. Large European sea-fish. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  84. An inward prominence of the symphysis pubis, encroaching on the pelvic cavity. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  85. Skeletal elements of a branchial arch. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  86. When qualified by an adjective denoting a bone, the cartilaginous rod from which that bone is developed. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  87. (Her.) An ordinary bounded by two horizontal lines drawn across an escutcheon, so as to contain one-fifth part of it. In popular language, Bar sinister = Baton (q.v.). Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  88. n. [French] A long piece of wood, metal, or other solid matter, used especially for a hindrance or obstruction any obstacle which obstructs or defends ; a barrier ;-a bank of gravel, or other matter, at the mouth of a river or harbour ;- the place in court which counsel occupy, or where prisoners are stationed ;-any tribunal ;-the inclosed place of a tavern, where liquors are kept for sale ;-a horizontal mark across the escutcheon;- in music, a line drawn perpendicularly across the staff. Cabinet Dictionary
  89. A piece of wood laid cross a passage to hinder entrance; a bolt to fasten a door; any obstacle; a rock or bank at the entrance of a harbour; any thing used for prevention; the place where causes of law are tried; an inclosed place in a tavern where a housekeeper sits; in law, a peremptory exception against a demand or plea; any thing by which the structure is held together; bars in musick, are strokes drawn perpendicularly across the lines of a piece of musick, used to regulate the beating or measure of musical time. Complete Dictionary

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