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Definitions of base

  1. To lay a foundation for; establish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To found or place on a base:-pr.p. basing; pa.p. based. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To place upon a base or basis; establish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. use (purified cocaine) by burning it and inhaling the fumes Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. assign to a station Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. To found or establish on a base. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  7. any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water; "bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. place that runner must touch before scoring; "he scrambled to get back to the bag" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (electronics) the part of a transistor that separates the emitter from the collector Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. installation from which a military force initiates operations; "the attack wiped out our forward bases" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a flat bottom on which something is intended to sit; "a tub should sit on its own base" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the principal ingredient of a mixture; "glycerinated gelatin is used as a base for many ointments"; "he told the painter that he wanted a yellow base with just a hint of green"; "everything she cooked seemed to have rice as the base" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the fundamental assumptions underlying an explanation; "the whole argument rested on a basis of conjecture" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. (anatomy) the part of an organ nearest its point of attachment; "the base of the skull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the place where you are stationed and from which missions start and end Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. The bottom of anything, considered as its support, or that on which something rests for support; the foundation; as, the base of a statue. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Fig.: The fundamental or essential part of a thing; the essential principle; a groundwork. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The lower part of a wall, pier, or column, when treated as a separate feature, usually in projection, or especially ornamented. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The lower part of a complete architectural design, as of a monument; also, the lower part of any elaborate piece of furniture or decoration. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That extremity of a leaf, fruit, etc., at which it is attached to its support. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The chief ingredient in a compound. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A substance used as a mordant. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two adjacent bastions. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The line or surface constituting that part of a figure on which it is supposed to stand. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The number from which a mathematical table is constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.) (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice. (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A place or tract of country, protected by fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the operations of an army proceed, forward movements are made, supplies are furnished, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The smallest kind of cannon. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. That part of an organ by which it is attached to another more central organ. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The basal plane of a crystal. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The ground mass of a rock, especially if not distinctly crystalline. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The lower part of the field. See Escutcheon. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The housing of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A kind of skirt ( often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The lower part of a robe or petticoat. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting place or a goal in various games. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. Any one of the four bounds which mark the circuit of the infield. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A rustic play; - called also prisoner's base, prison base, or bars. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To put on a base or basis; to lay the foundation of; to found, as an argument or conclusion; - used with on or upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. The part of a thing on which it rests; a foundation or ground work; that which combines with an acid to form a salt; a fortified line from which the operations of an army proceed; a starting place; in some games, a station or goal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. That on which a thing rests: foot: bottom: foundation: support: the chief ingredient. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. A skirt which hung down from the waist to the knees of a knight when on horseback. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. BASENESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Foundation; pedestal; support; chief ingredient. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. The lowest part; foundation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A compound capable of forming a salt with an acid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A basis of operations or of supplies. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The form of a word used in making derivatives, as by adding suffixes. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. The bottom; the foundation; the foot; the support; the principal ingredient in a compound body; the low or grave parts in music. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. serving as or forming a base; "the painter applied a base coat followed by two finishing coats" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  53. of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense); "baseborn wretches with dirty faces"; "of humble (or lowly) birth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  54. the bottom or lowest part; "the base of the mountain" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. (numeration system) the positive integer that is equivalent to one in the next higher counting place; "10 is the radix of the decimal system" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. the most important or necessary part of something; "the basis of this drink is orange juice" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. the bottom side of a geometric figure from which the altitude can be constructed; "the base of the triangle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. debased; not genuine; "an attempt to eliminate the base coinage" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. illegitimate Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. (used of metals) consisting of or alloyed with inferior metal; "base coins of aluminum"; "a base metal" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  61. Of little, or less than the usual, height; of low growth; as, base shrubs. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. Low in place or position. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. Illegitimate by birth; bastard. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. Of little comparative value, as metal inferior to gold and silver, the precious metals. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. Alloyed with inferior metal; debased; as, base coin; base bullion. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. Morally low. Hence: Low-minded; unworthy; without dignity of sentiment; ignoble; mean; illiberal; menial; as, a base fellow; base motives; base occupations. Webster Dictionary DB
  67. Not classical or correct. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. Deep or grave in sound; as, the base tone of a violin. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. Not held by honorable service; as, a base estate, one held by services not honorable; held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain organic bodies resembling them in their property of forming salts with acids. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. To abase; to let, or cast, down; to lower. Webster Dictionary DB
  72. To reduce the value of; to debase. Webster Dictionary DB
  73. Worthless; inferior; spurious or false; of mean spirit; morally abject or low; deep or grave in sound; commonly, bass. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  74. Low in place, value, estimation, or principle: mean: vile: worthless: (New Test.) humble, lowly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  75. Low; mean; vile. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  76. Low; ignoble; abject. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. Bass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  78. Mean; worthless; of low station; deep; grave. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for base?

Usage examples for base

  1. We have a base which is commanded by- that is, we had a base commanded-" " Enough!" – The Reluctant Weapon by Howard L. Myers
  2. " There is nothing base in my young men," said G. G. 's mother. – IT and Other Stories by Gouverneur Morris
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