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Definitions of bay

  1. a small recess opening off a larger room Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. utter in deep prolonged tones Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a horse of a moderate reddish-brown color Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a compartment in an aircraft used for some specific purpose; "he opened the bomb bay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a compartment on a ship between decks; often used as a hospital; "they put him in the sick bay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the sound of a hound on the scent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an indentation of a shoreline larger than a cove but smaller than a gulf Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. small Mediterranean evergreen tree with small blackish berries and glossy aromatic leaves used for flavoring in cooking; also used by ancient Greeks to crown victors Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (used of animals especially a horse) of a moderate reddish-brown color Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. bark with prolonged noises, of dogs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the bark of a dog Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. An inlet of the sea, usually smaller than a gulf, but of the same general character. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A small body of water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A recess or indentation shaped like a bay. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A compartment in a barn, for depositing hay, or grain in the stalks. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeachy Bay. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A berry, particularly of the laurel. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The laurel tree (Laurus nobilis). Hence, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A tract covered with bay trees. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To bark, as a dog with a deep voice does, at his game. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay; as, to bay the bear. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Deep-toned, prolonged barking. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To bathe. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. A bank or dam to keep back water. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; - applied to the color of horses. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To dam, as water; - with up or back. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A curve or inlet in the shore of a sea or lake; the body of water between two capes or headlands; a recess or opening in walls; a place for storing coal; the fore part of a ship between decks; the laurel-tree, noble laurel, or sweet-bay; an honorary garland or crown, composed of woven laurel leaves, given as a prize to conquerors and successful poets; the deep toned, prolonged bark of a dog; state or position of anyone obliged to face an enemy or other pursuer when no escape is possible; as, to stand at bay; a horse of a red or reddish color approaching to chestnut. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To bark with a deep sound, as hounds, in the chase. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To bark at; to pursue with barking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Red or reddish approaching to chestnut; applied to horses. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. In anatomy, a recess containing fluid, noting specifically the lacrymal bay, a slight recess at the internal angle or canthus of the eye, in which are the puncta lacrimalia, or openings of the lacrymal ducts. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  34. Reddish-brown inclining to chestnut. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. The laurel-tree:-pl. an honorary garland or crown of victory, orig. of laurel: literary excellence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. An inlet of the sea, an inward bend of the shore; also, in the U. S., applied to a tract of low swampy land covered with bay-trees. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To bark, as a dog at his game. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To bark at: to follow with barking. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. An arm of the sea; gulf; the European laurel-tree. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. Dark reddish brown. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To cry as a dog at chase. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To bark at; drive; bark hoarsely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Red-brown; said of horses. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A body of water partly enclosed by land; an arm of the sea. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Any recess. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A coarse mahogany. Baywood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. The laurel-tree. Baytree. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A laurel-wreath; poetic renown. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A deep bark, as of dogs in hunting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The situation of a hunted creature compelled to turn on its pursuers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A large space in a barn for hay. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A compartment or division between piers or columns. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Inclining to a chestnut colour, as a horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. A recess of the sea, caused by a bend inward of the land; a roadstead; a pond formed by a dam, for the purpose of driving mill-wheels; that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts; a recess or opening in walls. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. The laurel-tree. See Bays. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To bark at; to follow with barking; so to chase as to bring to bay. At bay, the state of being compelled to turn upon pursuers from an inability to escape. To keep at bay, to ward off an attack, or to keep an enemy from closing in; also, to watch, as, to keep a man at bay. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. Brown or reddish; inclining to a chestnut colour. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. An arm of the sea bending into the land; state of being hemmed in. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. The bark of a dog when his prey is brought to a stand : at bay, at a stand, and turned to keep the enemy in check; a stag is at bay when he turns and faces his pursuers. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. The laurel-tree, which bears red berries. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; -- applied to the color of horses. mso.anu.edu.au
  62. A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.; one of the main divisions of any structure, as the part of a bridge between two piers. mso.anu.edu.au
  63. To dam, as water; -- with up or back. mso.anu.edu.au
  64. denotes the estuary of the Dead Sea at the mouth of the Jordan ( Joshua 15:5 ; 18:19 ), also the southern extremity of the same sea ( 15:2 ). The same Hebrew word is rendered "tongue" in Isaiah 11:15 , where it is used with reference to the forked mouths of the Nile. Bay in Zech 6:3,7denotes the colour of horses, but the original Hebrew means strong, and is here used rather to describe the horses as fleet or spirited. biblestudytools.com
  65. A pond-head made of a great height to keep in water for the supply of a mill, etc., so that the wheel of the mill may be turned by the water rushing thence, through a passage or flood-gate. St. 27 Eliz. c. 19. Also an arm of the sea surrounded by land except at the entrance. In admiralty law and marine insurance. A bending or curving of the shore of the sea or of a lake, State v. Gilmanton, 14 N. H. 477. An opening into the land, where the water is shut in on all sides except at the entrance. U. S. v. Morel, 13 Amer. Jur. 2S0, Fed. Cas. No. 15,807. thelawdictionary.org
  66. Is an enclosure to keep in the water for the supply of a mill or other contrivance, so that the water may be able to, drive the wheels of such mill. Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 19. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  67. A large open water or harbor where ships may ride, is also called a bay; as, the Chesapeake Bay, the, Bay of New York. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  68. (As in an aeroplane "cargo bay") A space in acabinet into which a device of a certain size can bephysically mounted and connected to power and data.Common examples are a "drive bay" into which a disk drive(usually either 3.5 inch or 5.25 inch) can be inserted or thespace in a docking station where you insert a notebookcomputer or laptop computer to work as a desktop computeror to charge their batteries, print or connect to the officenetwork, etc. foldoc_fs
  69. Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; applied to the color of horses. dictgcide_fs
  70. To dam, as water; with up or back. dictgcide_fs
  71. b[=a], adj. reddish brown inclining to chestnut.--n. elliptical for 'bay-horse.'--n. BAYARD (b[=a]'ard), a bay-horse: a name for any horse generally, from 'Bayard,' the famous bay-coloured magic horse given to Renaud by Charlemagne: a man recklessly blind to danger: a fellow bold in his ignorance: a type of the knight, from Bayard (1476-1524), 'the knight without fear and without reproach.' [Fr. bai--L. badius, chestnut-coloured.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  72. b[=a], n. an inlet of the sea with a wider opening than a gulf: an inward bend of the shore. [Fr. baie--Low L. baia, a harbour.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  73. b[=a], n. the space between two columns: (Shak.) the space under one house gable: any recess.--n. BAY'-WIN'DOW, any window forming a recess.--adj. BAY'-WIN'DOWED. [O. Fr. baée--baer, to gape, be open; prob. conn. with the foregoing word.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  74. b[=a], n. the laurel-tree: (pl.) an honorary garland or crown of victory, originally of laurel: literary renown.--ns. BAY'BERRY; BAY'-RUM, an aromatic stimulant used for the skin and hair, and prepared by distilling the leaves of the bay-berry (Pimenta acris) with rum, or otherwise mixing the volatile oil of the leaves with alcohol. [O. Fr. baie, a berry--L. baca.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  75. b[=a], n. barking, baying (esp. of a dog when in pursuit): the combined cry of hounds in conflict with a hunted animal: used often of the last stand of a hunted animal when it faces the hounds at close quarters.--v.i. to bark (esp. of large dogs).--v.t. to bark at: to utter by baying: to follow with barking: to bring to bay.--TO HOLD, KEEP AT BAY, said of the hunted animal; TO STAND, BE, AT BAY, at close quarters. [These senses show a confusion of two distinct words, according to Murray: (1) to hold at bay = O. Fr. tenir a bay = It. tenere a bada, bay, bada, denoting the suspense indicated by the open mouth; (2) in the phrase 'to stand at bay,' the word points to O. Fr. abai, barking, bayer, to bark.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  76. BAYE, b[=a], v.t. (Spens.) to bathe. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  77. [French] A name given to the Laurel, Myreia, and other trees. B. oil, oil of laurel, oil of myreia. B. rum, spirit of myreia. White b., Sweet b., Magnolia glauca. na
  78. Kind of tree or shrub; (pl.) wreath of its leaves worn by conquerors or poets, heroic or poetic fame; b. -rum, perfume made from the leaves. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  79. Part of sea filling wide-mouthed opening of land; recess in mountain range; Bay-state, Massachusetts. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  80. Division of wall between columns or buttresses; recess (horse-b., stall; sickb., part of main deck used as hospital); space added to room by advancing window from wall line (b.-window, filling such space). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  81. Bark of large dog, of hounds in pursuit, esp. the chorus raised as they draw close; (in phrr. Lit. of hounds& quarry, fig. of persecutors& victim, applied to the hunted animal) stand or be at, turn to, hold hounds &c. at, b., show fight; (applied to hounds) hold or have at, bring or drive to, b., come to close quarters (with quarry). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  82. (Of large dogs) bark; bark at, esp. b. the moon. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  83. (horse). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  84. [Cf. Fr.] To bark loudly and in an hostile manner. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  85. n. [Latin] An inlet of trio sea smaller than a gulf ;-a principal compartment or division in a building ;-a place in a barn for depositing hay. Cabinet Dictionary
  86. n. [Latin] The laurel-tree ; an honorary garland or crown made of laurel;- pi. literary excellence. Cabinet Dictionary
  87. n. A state of defence and defense when escape has become impossible. Cabinet Dictionary
  88. An opening into the land. Complete Dictionary
  89. The state of any thing surrounded by enemies. Complete Dictionary
  90. In architecture, a term used to signify the division of a barn or other building. Bays are from fourteen to twenty feet long. Complete Dictionary
  91. An honorary crownor garland. Complete Dictionary

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