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Definitions of bay

  1. To bark at; drive; bark hoarsely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay; as, to bay the bear. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To dam, as water; - with up or back. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To bark at; to pursue with barking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To bark at: to follow with barking. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To bark, as a dog with a deep voice does, at his game. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Deep-toned, prolonged barking. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To bark with a deep sound, as hounds, in the chase. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To bark, as a dog at his game. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To cry as a dog at chase. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To bark at; to follow with barking; so to chase as to bring to bay. At bay, the state of being compelled to turn upon pursuers from an inability to escape. To keep at bay, to ward off an attack, or to keep an enemy from closing in; also, to watch, as, to keep a man at bay. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. a horse of a moderate reddish-brown color Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a compartment in an aircraft used for some specific purpose; "he opened the bomb bay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a compartment on a ship between decks; often used as a hospital; "they put him in the sick bay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. the sound of a hound on the scent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. an indentation of a shoreline larger than a cove but smaller than a gulf Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. small Mediterranean evergreen tree with small blackish berries and glossy aromatic leaves used for flavoring in cooking; also used by ancient Greeks to crown victors Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. An inlet of the sea, usually smaller than a gulf, but of the same general character. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A small body of water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A recess or indentation shaped like a bay. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A compartment in a barn, for depositing hay, or grain in the stalks. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeachy Bay. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A berry, particularly of the laurel. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The laurel tree (Laurus nobilis). Hence, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A tract covered with bay trees. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A bank or dam to keep back water. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A curve or inlet in the shore of a sea or lake; the body of water between two capes or headlands; a recess or opening in walls; a place for storing coal; the fore part of a ship between decks; the laurel-tree, noble laurel, or sweet-bay; an honorary garland or crown, composed of woven laurel leaves, given as a prize to conquerors and successful poets; the deep toned, prolonged bark of a dog; state or position of anyone obliged to face an enemy or other pursuer when no escape is possible; as, to stand at bay; a horse of a red or reddish color approaching to chestnut. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. The laurel-tree:-pl. an honorary garland or crown of victory, orig. of laurel: literary excellence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. An inlet of the sea, an inward bend of the shore; also, in the U. S., applied to a tract of low swampy land covered with bay-trees. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. An arm of the sea; gulf; the European laurel-tree. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. Dark reddish brown. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. A body of water partly enclosed by land; an arm of the sea. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Any recess. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A coarse mahogany. Baywood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The laurel-tree. Baytree. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A laurel-wreath; poetic renown. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A deep bark, as of dogs in hunting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. The situation of a hunted creature compelled to turn on its pursuers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A large space in a barn for hay. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A compartment or division between piers or columns. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A recess of the sea, caused by a bend inward of the land; a roadstead; a pond formed by a dam, for the purpose of driving mill-wheels; that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts; a recess or opening in walls. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. The laurel-tree. See Bays. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. An arm of the sea bending into the land; state of being hemmed in. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. The bark of a dog when his prey is brought to a stand : at bay, at a stand, and turned to keep the enemy in check; a stag is at bay when he turns and faces his pursuers. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. The laurel-tree, which bears red berries. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. (used of animals especially a horse) of a moderate reddish-brown color Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  49. Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; - applied to the color of horses. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Red or reddish approaching to chestnut; applied to horses. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. Reddish-brown inclining to chestnut. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. Red-brown; said of horses. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Inclining to a chestnut colour, as a horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Brown or reddish; inclining to a chestnut colour. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for bay?

Usage examples for bay

  1. The result of our interview was, that I determined to send all the party back to Fowler's Bay except one white man and old Jimmy, also all the horses except three, and to start with this small party and the camels to the eastward on the following day. – Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration Australia Twice Traversed. The Romance Of Exploration, Being A Narrative Compiled From The Journals Of Five Exploring Expeditions Into And Through Central South Australia, And Western Australia, From 1 by Ernest Giles
  2. Out in the middle of the bay there, where the water's deep, I dunno as ever I see a wave that would be more than say fifteen foot high. – Menhardoc by George Manville Fenn
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