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Definitions of beat

  1. To move with pulsation; to throb; to strike or dash with force, as a storm; to knock, as at a door. To beat down, to break, or throw down; to lay flat down; to crush; to lower the price. To beat back, to compel to retire. To beat into, to instil. To beat up, to attack suddenly, by repetition. To beat the wing, to flutter. To beat off, to drive back. To beat out, to hammer out. To beat the hoof, to go on foot. To beat time, to measure or regulate the time in music by the motion of the hand or foot. To beat the general, to give the signal to march. To beat the tattoo, to summon to quarters. To beat about to try to find, or search by various means or ways. To beat about the bush, to address one's self to a question in an underhand, indirect way. To beat up, to make progress against the direction of the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line, or traverse. To beat up for, to go about, in order to procure. To beat up and down, to run first one way and then another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To strike repeatedly; to lay repeated blows upon; as, to beat one's breast; to beat iron so as to shape it; to beat grain, in order to force out the seeds; to beat eggs and sugar; to beat a drum. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To punish by blows; to thrash. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To scour or range over in hunting, accompanied with the noise made by striking bushes, etc., for the purpose of rousing game. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To dash against, or strike, as with water or wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To tread, as a path. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish or conquer; to surpass. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To give the signal for, by beat of drum; to sound by beat of drum; as, to beat an alarm, a charge, a parley, a retreat; to beat the general, the reveille, the tattoo. See Alarm, Charge, Parley, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; - often with out. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To strike with repeated blows; thrash; knock; pound or break; fiatten or spread by blows; in hunting, to range over in order to rouse and drive out game; as, to beat a thicket for a hare; dash or strike against, as water or wind; tread, as a path; overcome or vanquish; excel; be too difficult for; flutter, as wings. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To strike repeatedly: to break or bruise: to strike, as bushes, in order to rouse game: to thrash: to over-come. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To strike repeatedly; overcome. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To strike repeatedly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To excel; overcome; vanquish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To move with pulsation or throbbing. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To be in agitation or doubt. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A round or course which is frequently gone over; as, a watchman's beat. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A place of habitual or frequent resort. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; - said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A cheat or swindler of the lowest grade; - often emphasized by dead; as, a dead beat. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To strike repeatedly; throb; dash or fall with force or violence; to sound a signal or summons, as by a drum; to sail against the wind by tacking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To give strokes repeatedly: to throb: to dash, as a flood or storm:- pr.p. beating; pa.t. beat; pa.p. beaten. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. beat through cleverness and wit; "I beat the traffic"; "She outfoxed her competitors" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. move with or as if with a regular alternating motion; "the city pulsated with music and excitement" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. stir vigorously; "beat the egg whites"; "beat the cream" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. To strike repeated blows; throb; pulsate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To work up against the wind by tacking. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To conquer; win. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To strike repeatedly; to bruise or break, by beating or pounding; to extend by beating; to strike, as bushes, to rouse game; to thrash; to mix or agitate by beating; to dash or strike, as water; to strike or brush, as wind; to tread, as a path; to vanquish or conquer; to harass; to overlabour; to baffle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To knock; to strike; to strike often; to crush or mix by blows; to overcome in a fight, in battle, or in strife; to throb like the pulse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. of Beat Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Beating. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. Beaten. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. the act of beating to windward; sailing as close as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  44. a stroke or blow; "the signal was two beats on the steam pipe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  45. a regular rate of repetition; "the cox raised the beat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  46. the basic rhythmic unit in a piece of music; "the piece has a fast rhythm"; "the conductor set the beat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  47. the sound of stroke or blow; "he heard the beat of a drum" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  48. the rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart; "he could feel the beat of her heart" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  49. a regular route for a sentry or policeman; "in the old days a policeman walked a beat and knew all his people by name" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  50. A stroke; a blow. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. A recurring stroke; a throb; a pulsation; as, a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. The rise or fall of the hand or foot, marking the divisions of time; a division of the measure so marked. In the rhythm of music the beat is the unit. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. One that beats, or surpasses, another or others; as, the beat of him. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. The act of one that beats a person or thing Webster Dictionary DB
  56. The act of obtaining and publishing a piece of news by a newspaper before its competitors; also, the news itself; a scoop. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. A smart tap on the adversary's blade. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. A stroke which is made again and again; a throb; a footfall; a round or course which is frequently gone over; as, the policeman's beat; the rise or fall of the hand or foot marking the divisions of time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  60. A stroke: a stroke recurring at intervals, or its sound, as of a watch or the pulse: a round or course: a place of resort. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  61. A repeated stroke; the round of a watchman or patrol. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  62. A stroke or blow; a pulsation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. A space regularly traversed, as by a sentry or a policeman. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. A stroke or blow; a recurring stroke; pulsation or throb; a footfall; a round or course which is often trodden; a place of habitual resort; the rise or fall of the hand and foot, in regulating the time; a transient grace-note, struck immediately before the note it is intended to ornament. Beat of drum, a succession of beats on a drum variously arranged for different orders. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. A stroke; a throb; the rise or fall of the hand or foot to mark the time in music. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  66. (informal) very tired; "was all in at the end of the day"; "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"; "bushed after all that exercise"; "I'm dead after that long trip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  67. a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations Wordnet Dictionary DB
  68. hit repeatedly; "beat on the door"; "beat the table with his shoe" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  69. strike (water or bushes) repeatedly to rouse animals for hunting Wordnet Dictionary DB
  70. strike (a part of one's own body) repeatedly, as in great emotion or in accompaniment to music; "beat one's breast"; "beat one's foot rhythmically" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  71. shape by beating; "beat swords into ploughshares" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  72. produce a rhythm by striking repeatedly; "beat the drum" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  73. make by pounding or trampling; "beat a path through the forest" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  74. indicate by beating, as with the fingers or drumsticks; "Beat the rhythm" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  75. sail with much tacking or with difficulty; "The boat beat in the strong wind" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  76. move with a flapping motion; "The bird's wings were flapping" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  77. glare or strike with great intensity; "The sun was beating down on us" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  78. avoid paying; "beat the subway fare" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  79. very tired; "was all in at the end of the day"; "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"; "bushed after all that exercise"; "I'm dead after that long trip" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  80. A sudden swelling or reenforcement of a sound, recurring at regular intervals, and produced by the interference of sound waves of slightly different periods of vibrations; applied also, by analogy, to other kinds of wave motions; the pulsation or throbbing produced by the vibrating together of two tones not quite in unison. See Beat, v. i., 8. Webster Dictionary DB
  81. Weary; tired; fatigued; exhausted. Webster Dictionary DB
  82. Weary: fatigued. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  83. Exhausted with exertion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  84. Beat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  85. Beaten, Beat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for beat?

Usage examples for beat

  1. It does beat all, the way folks can't let that boy alone. – The Green Satin Gown by Laura E. Richards
  2. You beat me to it. – Tom Slade Motorcycle Dispatch Bearer by Percy Keese Fitzhugh
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