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Definitions of bias

  1. influence in an unfair way; "you are biasing my choice by telling me yours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. slanting diagonally across the grain of a fabric; "a bias fold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to be biased Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side of the fabric Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. A weight on the side of the ball used in the game of bowls, or a tendency imparted to the ball, which turns it from a straight line. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A leaning of the mind; propensity or prepossession toward an object or view, not leaving the mind indifferent; bent; inclination. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A wedge-shaped piece of cloth taken out of a garment (as the waist of a dress) to diminish its circumference. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A slant; a diagonal; as, to cut cloth on the bias. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Inclined to one side; swelled on one side. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Cut slanting or diagonally, as cloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. In a slanting manner; crosswise; obliquely; diagonally; as, to cut cloth bias. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To incline to one side; to give a particular direction to; to influence; to prejudice; to prepossess. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions. Medical Dictionary DB
  16. An oblique or diagonal line, especially a cut across a fabric; a leaning of the mind toward a particular opinion; prejudice. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To give a particular direction to; incline to one side; influence; prejudice; as, the newspapers we read bias our opinions. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. In a slanting manner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Biased. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Biasing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. A weight on one side of a bowl (in the game of bowling), making it slope or turn to one side: a slant or leaning to one side: an inclination of the mind, prejudice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To cause to turn to one side: to prejudice or prepossess; pp. biased or biassed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. A leaning; inclination. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To cause to incline in any direction; to prepossess. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To cause to incline; influence unduly; prejudice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Running diagonally across the texture; cut slantingly, as cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A line, cut, or seam running obliquely across the threads of a fabric. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A mental leaning or prejudice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A weight in the side of a bowl to turn it from a straight line in its course; a leaning of the mind; inclination; prepossession. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To cause to incline to one side; to prepossess; to prejudice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A disposition or leaning of the mind; inclination; prepossession. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To incline to; to prejudice in favour of. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Inclination; bent; prepossession: a preconceived opinion; a predisposition to decide a cause or an issue in a certain way, which does not leave the mind perfectly open to conviction. Maddox v. State, 32 Ga. 5S7, 79 Am. Dec. 307; Pierson v. State, 18 Tex. App. 55S; Hinkle v. State, 94 Ga. 595, 21 S. E. 601. This term is not synonymous with “prejudice.” By the use of this word in a statute declaring disqualification of jurors, the legislature intended to describe another and somewhat different ground of disqualification. A man cannot be prejudiced against another without being biased against him ; but he may be biased without being prejudiced. Bias is “a particular influential power, which sways the judgment; the inclination of the mind towards a particular object.” It is not to be supposed that the legislature expected to secure in the juror a state of mind absolutely free from all inclination to one side or the other. The statute means that, although a juror has not formed a judgment for or against the prisoner, before the evidence is heard on the trial, yet, if he is under such an influence as so sways his mind to the one side or the other as to prevent his deciding the cause according to the evidence, he is incompetent. Willis v. State, 12 Ga. 444. Actual bias consists in the existence of a state of mind on the part of the juror which satisfies the court, in the exercise of a sound discretion, that the juror cannot try the issues impartially and without prejudice to the substantial rights of the party challenging. State v. Chapman, 1 S. D. 414. 47 N. W. 411, 10 L. R. A. 432; People v. McQuade, 110 N. Y. 284. 18 N. E. 150, 1 L. R. A. 273; People v. Wells, 100 Cal. 227, 34 Pac. 718. thelawdictionary.org
  34. A particular influential power which sways the judgment; the inclination or propensity of the mind towards a particular object. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  35. Justice requires that the judge should have no bias for or against any individual; and that his mind should be perfectly free to act as the law requires. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  36. There is, however, one kind of bias which the courts suffer to influence them in their judgments it is a bias favorable to a class of cases, or persons, as distinguished from an individual case or person. A few examples will explain this. A bias is felt on account of convenience. 1 Ves. sen. 13, 14; 3 Atk. 524. It is also felt in favor of the heir at law, as when there is an heir on one side and a mere volunteer on the other. Willes, R. 570 1 W. Bl. 256; Amb. R. 645; 1 Ball & B. 309 1 Wils. R. 310 3 Atk. 747 Id. 222. On the other hand, the court leans against double portions for children; M'Clell. R. 356; 13 Price, R. 599 against double provisions, and double satisfactions; 3 Atk. R. 421 and against forfeitures. 3 T. R. 172. Vide, generally, 1 Burr. 419 1 Bos. & Pull. 614; 3 Bos. & Pull. 456 Ves. jr. 648 Jacob, Rep. 115; 1 Turn. & R. 350. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. b[=i]'as, n. a bulge or greater weight on one side of a bowl (in the game of bowling), making it slope or turn to one side: a slant or leaning to one side: a one-sided inclination of the mind, prejudice: any special influence that sways the mind.--v.t. to cause to turn to one side: to prejudice or prepossess:--pa.p. b[=i]'ased or b[=i]'assed.--ns. B[=I]'AS-DRAW'ING (Shak.), a turn awry; B[=I]'ASING, a bias or inclination to one side. [Fr. biais, of dubious origin; Diez suggests L. bifax, bifacem, two-faced.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. (In bowls) lopsided form of a bowl, its oblique course, the weight or influence deflecting it; (metaph. from bowls) inclination, predisposition (towards), prejudice, influence; (Dressmaking &c.; as a., n., & adv.) cut on the b., cut b., cut obliquely across the texture, b. band &c., band so cut. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Give a bias to, influence (usu. unfairly), inspire with prejudice. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. n. [French] A weight on the side of a bowl which turns it from a straight line;—a leaning of the mind; propensity toward an object;—a wedge-shaped piece of cloth taken out of a garment to diminish its circumference: inclination; propensity. Cabinet Dictionary
  41. adv. In a slanting manner: crosswise; athwart; diagonally. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. The weight lodged on one side of a bowl, which turns it from the strait line; any thing which turns a man to a particular course; propenstion, inclination. Complete Dictionary

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