Spellcheck.net

Definitions of bias

  1. To incline to one side; to give a particular direction to; to influence; to prejudice; to prepossess. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To give a particular direction to; incline to one side; influence; prejudice; as, the newspapers we read bias our opinions. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To cause to turn to one side: to prejudice or prepossess; pp. biased or biassed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To cause to incline in any direction; to prepossess. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To cause to incline; influence unduly; prejudice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. cause to be biased Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To cause to incline to one side; to prepossess; to prejudice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To incline to; to prejudice in favour of. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. Biasing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. A weight on the side of the ball used in the game of bowls, or a tendency imparted to the ball, which turns it from a straight line. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A leaning of the mind; propensity or prepossession toward an object or view, not leaving the mind indifferent; bent; inclination. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A wedge-shaped piece of cloth taken out of a garment (as the waist of a dress) to diminish its circumference. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A slant; a diagonal; as, to cut cloth on the bias. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An oblique or diagonal line, especially a cut across a fabric; a leaning of the mind toward a particular opinion; prejudice. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A weight on one side of a bowl (in the game of bowling), making it slope or turn to one side: a slant or leaning to one side: an inclination of the mind, prejudice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A leaning; inclination. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. A line, cut, or seam running obliquely across the threads of a fabric. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A mental leaning or prejudice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. A weight in the side of a bowl to turn it from a straight line in its course; a leaning of the mind; inclination; prepossession. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. A disposition or leaning of the mind; inclination; prepossession. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. a line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side of the fabric Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. In a slanting manner; crosswise; obliquely; diagonally; as, to cut cloth bias. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. In a slanting manner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. slanting diagonally across the grain of a fabric; "a bias fold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. Inclined to one side; swelled on one side. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Cut slanting or diagonally, as cloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Running diagonally across the texture; cut slantingly, as cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Biased. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for bias?

Usage examples for bias

  1. Multitudes go to ruin who must trace their wrong bias back to cultivated and even Christian homes. – A Knight Of The Nineteenth Century by E. P. Roe
  2. Only a strong emotional bias can lead a man to dwell with emphasis upon the difficulties to be met with in the one field, and to pass lightly over those with which one meets in the other. – An Introduction to Philosophy by George Stuart Fullerton
X