Spellcheck.net

Definitions of bind

  1. To contract; to grow hard or stiff; to become costive; to be obligatory. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To tie together; make fast by tying; fasten; constrain; have moral or legal force; be obligatory. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To put a bandage or a binding on; secure between covers, as the sheets of a book. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To tie, or confine with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.; to fetter; to make fast; as, to bind grain in bundles; to bind a prisoner. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind; as, attraction binds the planets to the sun; frost binds the earth, or the streams. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To make fast ( a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something; as, to bind a belt about one; to bind a compress upon a part. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To prevent or restrain from customary or natural action; as, certain drugs bind the bowels. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To sew or fasten together, and inclose in a cover; as, to bind a book. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Fig.: To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other moral tie; as, to bind the conscience; to bind by kindness; bound by affection; commerce binds nations to each other. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To bring (any one) under definite legal obligations; esp. under the obligation of a bond or covenant. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To cover, as with a bandage; to bandage or dress; - sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To place under legal obligation to serve; to indenture; as, to bind an apprentice; - sometimes with out; as, bound out to service. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To confine or make fast with a cord or band; confine or hold by physical force; unite by bonds of affection, loyalty, or duty; hold by any moral tie; hinder or restrain; protect or strengthen by a band, border, or cover; fasten together; cause to stick together; to oblige by a promise, law. duty, etc.; to fasten together in a cover, as a book. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To tie or fasten together with a band: to sew a border on: to fasten together (the leaves of a book) and put a cover on: to oblige by oath or agreement or duty: to restrain: to render hard:-pa.t. and pa.p. bound. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. To tie or fasten with a band; sew a binding on; attach covers and back to a book; to restrain; to oblige. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To tie; to confine by any ligature. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To contract; to grow hard or stiff; to cohere or stick together in a mass; as, clay binds by heat. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To exert a binding or restraining influence. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To tie up something; as, to reap and bind; to have the force of a duty or necessity; grow hard or stiff; to stick. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. stick to firmly; "Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. cause to be constipated; "These foods tend to constipate you" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. form a chemical bond with; "The hydrogen binds the oxygen" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. bind by an obligation; cause to be indebted; "He's held by a contract"; "I'll hold you by your promise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. To fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. make fast; tie or secure, with or as if with a rope; "The Chinese would bind the feet of their women" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. provide with a binding, as of books Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. To fasten together with a band; to wrap or gird with a cover or bandage; to confine or restrain with a bond or otherwise; to oblige; to engage; to compel: to confirm or ratify; to make costive; to make hard or firm; to form a border; to fasten with a band or anything that strengthens the edges; to sew together and cover with leather, or anything firm, as a book; to cover or secure by a band; to oblige to serve by contract. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To tie together; to fasten; to confine or restrain; to oblige by a promise, an oath, or an agreement; to form or sew on a border; to render costive or hard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Binding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. something that hinders as if with bonds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. secure with or as if with ropes; "tie down the prisoners"; "tie up the old newspapes and bring them to the recycling shed" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. provide with a binding; "bind the books in leather" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. That which binds or ties. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Any twining or climbing plant or stem, esp. a hop vine; a bine. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Indurated clay, when much mixed with the oxide of iron. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A ligature or tie for grouping notes. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Anything which holds or ties; a twining stem; a stalk of hops; a musical sign or brace grouping notes together. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. A stalk of hops; the indurated clay of coal-mines. A ligature or tie which groups notes together. A bind of eels, a quantity numbering 250. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The winding or climbing stem of a climbing plant,-thus, hop-bine, the shoots of hops : woodbine, the honeysuckle : bindwood or binwood, in Scot., the ivy : bindweed, a wild plant with twining stems; a convolvulus. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Bound. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for bind?

Usage examples for bind

  1. Take the rascal down and bind him fast to the gallows- tree against our return. – Robin Hood by J. Walker McSpadden
  2. If love could not bind thee to me, then shall care be taken that thou strayest not again from thy home. – Desert Love by Joan Conquest
X