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Definitions of bit

  1. a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. injured by bites or stings; "leaving the biter bit"; "her poor mosquito-bitten legs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the cutting part of a drill; usually pointed and threaded and is replaceable in a brace or bitstock or drill press; "he looked around for the right size bit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. piece of metal held in horse's mouth by reins and used to control the horse while riding; "the horse was not accustomed to a bit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a small fragment; "overheard snatches of their conversation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an instance of some kind; "it was a nice piece of work"; "he had a bit of good luck" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a small fragment of something broken off from the whole; "a bit of rock caught him in the eye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a unit of measurement of information (from Binary + digIT); the amount of information in a system having two equiprobable states; "there are 8 bits in a byte" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (British) a small quantity; "a spot of tea"; "a bit of paper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. an indefinitely short time; "wait just a moment"; "it only takes a minute"; "in just a bit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a small quantity; "a spot of tea"; "a bit of paper" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. The part of a bridle, usually of iron, which is inserted in the mouth of a horse, and having appendages to which the reins are fastened. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Fig.: Anything which curbs or restrains. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To put a bridle upon; to put the bit in the mouth of. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. imp. & p. p. of Bite. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. A part of anything, such as may be bitten off or taken into the mouth; a morsel; a bite. Hence: A small piece of anything; a little; a mite. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Somewhat; something, but not very great. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A tool for boring, of various forms and sizes, usually turned by means of a brace or bitstock. See Bitstock. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The part of a key which enters the lock and acts upon the bolt and tumblers. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The cutting iron of a plane. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. 3d sing. pr. of Bid, for biddeth. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. In the British West Indies, a fourpenny piece, or groat. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. imp. & p. p. of Bite. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. In the Southern and Southwestern States, a small silver coin (as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12 12 cents; also, the sum of 12 12 cents. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Of the verb bite. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. A tool for boring; the metal mouthpiece of a bridle; the part of a key which enters the lock; the cutting blade of a plane; a small piece of anything; any small coin; anything that curbs or restrains. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To put a bridle upon; put a bit in the mouth of; restrain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Bitted. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Bitting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A bite, a morsel: a small piece: the smallest degree: a small tool for boring: the part of the bridle which the horse holds in his mouth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To put the bit in the mouth:-pr.p. bitting: pa.p. bitted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A small piece; small tool for boring; that part of a bridle which is in the horse's mouth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To put the bit in the mouth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To put a bit in the mouth of; train to or control by the bit; curb; restrain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Imp. & pp. of BITE, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A wood - boring tool adapted to be used with a stock or brace. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The metallic mouthpiece of a bridle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A small piece, portion, or fragment; a little. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A morsel; a small piece; a whit or degree; an instrument for boring boles; the cutting part of a carpenter's plane; the iron part of the bridle put into a horse's mouth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To put the bit in the mouth. See Bite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. The iron mouthpiece of a bridle; a small piece of anything; a tool. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To put the bit in a horse's mouth; to restrain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. In the Southern and Southwestern States, a small silver coin as the real formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12 1/2 cents; also, the sum of 12 1/2 cents. mso.anu.edu.au
  45. the curb put into the mouths of horses to restrain them. The Hebrew word (metheg) so rendered in Psalms 32:9 is elsewhere translated "bridle" ( 2 Kings 19:28 ; Proverbs 26:3 ; Isaiah 37:29 ). Bits were generally made of bronze or iron, but sometimes also of gold or silver. In James 3:3 the Authorized Version translates the Greek word by "bits," but the Revised Version by "bridles." biblestudytools.com
  46. A digit in binary code. It is a b and is the smallest unit for computing information. The information is stored in 0s and 1s. Refer to byte. thelawdictionary.org
  47. (b) binary digit.The unit of information; the amount of information obtained byasking a yes-or-no question; a computational quantity that cantake on one of two values, such as false and true or 0 and 1;the smallest unit of storage - sufficient to hold one bit.A bit is said to be "set" if its value is true or 1, and"reset" or "clear" if its value is false or 0. One speaks ofsetting and clearing bits. To toggle or "invert" a bit isto change it, either from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0.The term "bit" first appeared in print in the computer-sciencesense in 1949, and seems to have been coined by the eminentstatistician, John Tukey. Tukey records that it evolvedover a lunch table as a handier alternative to "bigit" or"binit".See also flag, trit, mode bit, byte, word. foldoc_fs
  48. The smallest unit of information, equivalent to a choice between two alternatives, as yes or no; on or off. See also qubit. dictgcide_fs
  49. The physical representation of a bit of information in a computer memory or a data storage medium. Within a computer circuit a bit may be represented by the state of a current or an electrical charge; in a magnetic storage medium it may be represented by the direction of magnetization; on a punched card or on paper tape it may be represented by the presence or absence of a hole at a particular point on the card or tape. dictgcide_fs
  50. bit, n. a bite, a morsel: a small piece: the smallest degree: a small tool for boring (see BRACE): the part of the bridle which the horse holds in his mouth (see BRIDLE)--hence, TO TAKE THE BIT IN HIS TEETH, to be beyond restraint.--v.t. to put the bit in the mouth; to curb or restrain:--pr.p. bit'ting; pa.p. bit'ted.--BIT BY BIT, piecemeal, gradually. [From BITE.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. (a b. & a sup); boring-piece of drill, cutting-iron of plane, nipping-part of pincers &c., part of key that grips lock-lever; mouthpiece of bridle, (fig.) control, (draw b., slacken pace; take b. between teeth, reject control). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. Morsel of food (dainty, tit-, b.); small piece of anything (b. by b., gradually; give a b. of one\'s mind, speak candidly); piece of scenery actual or painted; short passage in book &c.; bb. of, poor little (children, furniture); a b. of a, rather a (coward &c.); a b., rather, not a b., not at all, every b. as, quite as; a short time (wait a b.); small coin (United States, of fractions of Spanish dollar; in Engl., three-penny b., &c.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. Put b. into mouth of (horse); accustom to the b.; restrain. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. not a b. of it (colloq.), (emphatic for) not so, not at all. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The iron mouth-piece of a bridle, to which the reins are fastened. Cabinet Dictionary
  56. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A mouthful; a morsel; a mite;—a small coin;—a small instrument for boring;—the edge of a carpenter's plane. Cabinet Dictionary
  57. The iron part of the bridle which is put into the horse's mouth. Complete Dictionary
  58. As much meat as is put into the mouth at once; a small piece of any thing; a Spanish West India silver coin, valued at sevenpence halfpenny. Complete Dictionary

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