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Definitions of black

  1. being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness; having little or no hue owing to absorption of almost all incident light; "black leather jackets"; "as black as coal"; "rich black soil" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make or become black; "The smoke blackened the ceiling"; "The ceiling blackened" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. black clothing (worn as a sign of mourning); "the widow wore black" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (chess or checkers) the darker pieces Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the quality or state of the achromatic color of least lightness (bearing the least resemblance to white) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. popular child actress of the 1930's (born 1927) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. British chemist who identified carbon dioxide and who formulated the concepts of specific heat and latent heat (1728-1799) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. total absence of light; "they fumbled around in total darkness"; "in the black of night" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. marked by anger or resentment or hostility; "black looks"; "black words" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. of or belonging to a racial group having dark skin especially of sub-Saharan African origin; "a great people--a black people--...injected new meaning and dignity into the veins of civilization"- Martin Luther King Jr. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. soiled with dirt or soot; "with feet black from playing outdoors"; "his shirt was black within an hour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. distributed or sold illicitly; "the black economy pays no taxes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. (of the face) made black especially as with suffused blood; "a face black with fury" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. offering little or no hope; "the future looked black"; "prospects were bleak"; "Life in the Aran Islands has always been bleak and difficult"- J.M.Synge; "took a dim view of things" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. (of events) having extremely unfortunate or dire consequences; bringing ruin; "the stock market crashed on Black Friday"; "a calamitous defeat"; "the battle was a disastrous end to a disastrous campaign"; "such doctrines, if true, would be absolutely fatal to my theory"- Charles Darwin; "it is fatal to enter any war without the will to win it"- Douglas MacArthur; "a fateful error" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shame; "Man...has written one of his blackest records as a destroyer on the oceanic islands"- Rachel Carson; "an ignominious retreat"; "inglorious defeat"; "an opprobrious monument to human greed"; "a shameful display of cowardice" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. harshly ironic or sinister; "black humor"; "a grim joke"; "grim laughter"; "fun ranging from slapstick clowning ... to savage mordant wit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. extremely dark; "a black moonless night"; "through the pitch-black woods"; "it was pitch-dark in the celler" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. stemming from evil characteristics or forces; wicked or dishonorable; "black deeds"; "a black lie"; "his black heart has concocted yet another black deed"; "Darth Vader of the dark side"; "a dark purpose"; "dark undercurrents of ethnic hostility"; "the scheme of some sinister intelligence bent on punishing him"-Thomas Hardy Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. (board games) the darker pieces Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. dressed in black; "a black knight"; "black friars" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. (of coffee) without cream or sugar Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. (of intelligence operations) deliberately misleading; "black propaganda" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the color of soot or coal; of the darkest or a very dark color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. In a less literal sense: Enveloped or shrouded in darkness; very dark or gloomy; as, a black night; the heavens black with clouds. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Fig.: Dismal, gloomy, or forbidding, like darkness; destitute of moral light or goodness; atrociously wicked; cruel; mournful; calamitous; horrible. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Expressing menace, or discontent; threatening; sullen; foreboding; as, to regard one with black looks. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Sullenly; threateningly; maliciously; so as to produce blackness. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. That which is destitute of light or whiteness; the darkest color, or rather a destitution of all color; as, a cloth has a good black. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A black pigment or dye. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A person whose skin is of a black color, or shaded with black; esp. a member or descendant of certain African races. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. A black garment or dress; as, she wears black Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Mourning garments of a black color; funereal drapery. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The part of a thing which is distinguished from the rest by being black. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A stain; a spot; a smooch. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To make black; to blacken; to soil; to sully. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To make black and shining, as boots or a stove, by applying blacking and then polishing with a brush. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A negro; a person whose skin is of a black color, or shaded with black; esp. a member or descendant of certain African races. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A negro. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. Entirely without light; of the darkest hue; opposite to white; wrapped in darkness; dismal; gloomy or forbidding; without moral light or goodness; evil; threatening; clouded with anger; sullen. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. The darkest color; the opposite of white; a black color or dye; a negro; mourning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To make black; blacken; apply blacking to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Without color, reflecting no light, the opposite of white. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  45. Of the darkest color: without color: obscure: dismal: sullen: horrible. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. Black color: absence of color: a negro: mourning. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. To make black: to soil or stain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. BLACKNESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. That which reflects no light; a negro. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To become black. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To make black. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. Without light; very dark; gloomy; horrible. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. To make or become black; blacken. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. Reflecting little or no light; dark; swarthy; gloomy; dismal; forbidding; sad; evil; malignant; deadly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. The absence of color, or the darkest of all colors; sable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. Anything black. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. Of the darkest colour; destitute of light; dark; sulien; having a cloudy look or countenance; atrociously wicked; horrible; dismal; mournful. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. Want of colour; the darkest of all colours; a negro; a black dress; mourning; a particle of soot or black dirt. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  59. To blacken; to soil. Black and blue, livid. Black and white, writing or print. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  60. The opposite of white; dark; cloudy; dismal; sullen; very wicked. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. Name of the darkest of colours; a negro. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  62. To make black; to dirty or soil. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  63. properly the absence of all colour. In Proverbs 7:9 the Hebrew word means, as in the margin of the Revised Version, "the pupil of the eye." It is translated "apple" of the eye in Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Psalms 17:8 ; Proverbs 7:2 . It is a different word which is rendered "black" in Leviticus 13:31 Leviticus 13:37 ; Cant 1:5 ; 5:11 ; and Zechariah 6:2 Zechariah 6:6 . It is uncertain what the "black marble" of Esther 1:6 was which formed a part of the mosaic pavement. biblestudytools.com
  64. blak, adj. of the darkest colour: without colour: obscure: dismal: sullen: horrible: dusky: foul, dirty: malignant: dark-haired, wearing dark armour or clothes.--n. black colour: absence of colour: a negro: mourning: the dark smut which attacks wheat: a speck of black on the face, a sooty particle in the air: black clothes, esp. dress trousers.--v.t. to make black: to soil or stain: to draw in black.--n. BLACK'AMOOR, a black Moor: a negro.--adjs. BLACK'-AND-TAN, having black hair on the back, and tan or yellowish-brown elsewhere, esp. of a terrier; BLACK'-A-VISED, of dark complexion (probably originally black-à-vis).--v.t. BLACK'BALL, to reject in voting by putting a black ball into a ballot-box.--ns. BLACK'BALLING, the act of so rejecting a candidate; BLACK'-BAND, iron ore containing enough of coal to calcine it; BLACK'-BEE'TLE, a cockroach; BLACK'BERRY, the berry of the bramble; BLACK'BIRD, a species of thrush of a black colour: a current name for a negro or Polynesian kidnapped for labour; BLACK'BIRDING, the kidnapping of such; BLACK'BOARD, a board painted black, used in schools for writing, forming figures, &c.--adjs. BLACK'-BOD'ING, of evil omen; BLACK'-BROWED, having black eyebrows: sullen.--ns. BLACK'-CAP, a bird, a species of warbler, so called from its black crown: (cook.) an apple roasted until it is black, and served up in a custard: the full-dress cap put on by English judges when about to pronounce sentence of death; BLACK'-CATT'LE, oxen, bulls, and cows; BLACK'-CHALK, a variety of clay-slate of a bluish-black colour, used for drawing, and also for making black paint; BLACK'COCK, a species of grouse, common in the north of England and in Scotland; BLACK'-CURR'ANT, a garden shrub with black fruit used in making preserves; BLACK'-DEATH, a name given to the plague of the 14th century from the black spots which appeared on the skin; BLACK'-DRAUGHT, the popular name for a purgative medicine consisting chiefly of senna and Epsom salts; BLACK'-DROP, a liquid preparation of opium, vinegar, and sugar.--v.t. BLACK'EN, to make black: to defame.--adj. BLACK'FACED, having a black face: dismal.--ns. BLACK'-FLAG, the flag of a pirate, or that hoisted at the execution of a criminal--from its colour; BLACK'-FRIAR, a friar of the Dominican order, so called from his black mantle (over a white woollen habit): (pl.) the region in a city, as London, where their convent stood; BLACKGUARD (blag'ärd), originally applied to the lowest menials about a court, who took charge of the pots, kettles, &c.: a low, ill-conducted fellow.--adj. low: scurrilous.--v.t. to treat as a blackguard; v.i. to play the blackguard.--n. BLACK'GUARDISM.--adv. BLACK'GUARDLY.--ns. BLACK'-HEART'EDNESS; BLACK'-HOLE, formerly the name for the punishment-cell in a barrack: the memorable black-hole in the Fort-William barracks at Calcutta, into which, in in 1756, as many as 146 Europeans were thrust over night, of whom only 23 were found surviving in the morning; BLACK'ING, a substance used for blacking leather, &c.--adj. BLACK'ISH.--ns. BLACK'-JACK, a vessel for holding drink, originally made of leather: (naut.) the flag of a pirate; BLACK'-LEAD, a black mineral (plumbago, not lead) used in making pencils, blacking grates, &c.; BLACK'LEG, a low, gambling fellow: a turf-swindler: a term applied by strikers to men willing to work for the wages against which themselves have struck--also BLACK'-NEB; BLACK'-LET'TER, the old English (also called Gothic) letter ([Black-letter]); BLACK'-LIST, a list of defaulters; BLACK'-MAR[=I]'A, the closely covered, usually black-painted van in which prisoners are conveyed between the court and the prison; BLACK'-MON'DAY, Easter Monday, so called on account of the sufferings experienced by the army of Edward III. from the severity of the weather on that day in 1360; BLACK'-MONK, a monk of the order of St Benedict, from his garments; BLACK'NESS; BLACK'-PUDD'ING, a blood-pudding (q.v.).; BLACK'-ROD, the usher of the chapter of the Garter and of the House of Lords, so called from the black wand tipped with a golden lion which he carries; BLACK'-SHEEP, a disreputable member of a family or group; BLACK'SMITH, a smith who works in iron, as opposed to a Whitesmith, or one who works in tin; BLACK'THORN, a species of dark-coloured thorn: the sloe: a stick made from its stem.--adjs. BLACK'-TRESSED, having black tresses; BLACK-VISAGED (blak'-viz'[=a]jd), having a black visage or appearance.--n. BLACK'-WASH, a lotion of calomel and lime-water: anything that blackens.--BLACK AND BLUE, with the livid colour of a bruise in the flesh; BLACK BOOK, an official book bound in black, a book recording the names of persons deserving punishment; BLACK EYE, an eye of which the iris is dark--a point of beauty: a discoloration around the eye due to a blow or fall; BLACK FELLOW, a native in Australia.--IN BLACK AND WHITE, in writing or in print: in art, in no colours but black and white.--TO BE BLACK IN THE FACE, to have the face purple through strangulation, passion, or effort; TO BE IN ANY ONE'S BLACK BOOKS, to have incurred any one's displeasure; TO BLACK OUT, to obliterate with black. [A.S. blac, blæc, black.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. Devoid of color or of light; reflecting neither white light nor colored rays; having a hue the opposite of white. B. alder, the Alnus serralata, Rhamnus Frangula, and Prinos verticillata. B. antimony, antimony trisulphide. B. birch, the Betula lenta. B. bryony, the Bryonia alba (because of its B. berries). B. conosh (B. snakeroot) cimicifuga. B. death, a very virulent, infectious disease which overran Europe in the Middle Ages. Probably a variety of the plague. B. draught, compound infusion of senna. B. drop, vinegar of opium. B. fever, see Black-water fever. B. ginger, coated ginger. B. haw, viburnum. B. head, comedo. B. induration of lungs, anthracosis. B. lead, graphite. B. leg, purpura haemorrhagica; in cattle and sheep, symptomatic anthrax. B. measles, measles in which the eruption is haemorrhagic. B. mustard, see Mustard. B. pepper, see Pepper. B. quarter, symptomatic anthrax. B. root, leptandra. B. tea, tea-leaves turned B. by being dried slowly and kept in heaps. B. tongue, glossophytia. B. vomit, matter consisting of blood made B. by the gastric juice, vomited in yellow fever and other diseases. B. walnut, the Juglans nigra (see Walnut). B. wash, water containing in suspension mercurous oxide (B. oxide of mercury), made by precipitating lime-water with calomel. na
  66. Opposite to white, colourless from the absence or complete absorption of all light; so near this as to have no distinguishable colour; very dark-coloured (b. in the face, purple with strangulation or passion); darkskinned; dark-clothed; (of sky, deep water, &c.) dusky, gloomy; (of hands, linen) dirty; (as specific epithet) b. bear, currant, snake, heart-cherry; deadly, sinister, wicked, hateful, (b.-hearted; b. ingratitude; crimes of blackest dye); dismal (b. despair); angry, sulky, threatening, (b.-browed; b. looks; look b.); implying disgrace or condemnation (b. mark, of discredit against one\'s name; b. book, list, of persons suspect, tabooed, &c.; deep in one\'s b. books, quite out of his favour). B. & blue, discoloured with bruise; b. & tan, (dog) so coloured; b. & white, ink drawing (down in b. & w., recorded in writing cr print); b. art, magic[medieval Latin]; b. ball, used to reject candidate in club ballot, whence blackball v.t.; b.-beetle, cockroach; blackberry, bramble or its fruit (plentiful as blackberries, as can be; blackberrying, gathering them); blackbird, European song-bird, kidnapped negro on slaveship (blackbirding, trade in these); b.-board, in lecture-room for demonstrations in chalk; b. cap, put on by judge in sentencing to death; blackcap, kinds of bird, esp. the B. Warbler; b. CATTLE; b. cock, male (opp. grey hen) of B. Grouse; B. Country, smoky district in Staffs. &c.; b. dog, sulks; b. draught, an aperient; b. eye, discoloured with bruise, also with dark iris whence blackeyed a.; b.-face, darkfaced sheep; b. fellow, Australian native; b.-fish, a species, also salmon just after spawning; b. flag, used by pirates, also signal of execution completed; b. friar, Dominican; b. game, b. Grouse (& see b. cock); blackguard, scoundrel (ly), foul-mouthed (person), whence blackguardly a., blackguardism (2) n., (v.t.) call blackguard, abuse scurrilously b.-head, kinds of bird, esp. kind of gull; b. hole, military lock-up (so B. H. of Calcutta); b.-jack, tarred leather wine- bottle; b.-lead, (polish with) PLUMBAGO blackleg, swindler esp. on turf, workman who works for master whose men are on strike b. letter, old type like the German; blackmail, (Hist.) tribute exacted by freebooters for protection& immunity, (mod., v.t. & n.) (force to make) payment for not revealing discreditable secrets &c., whence blackmailer n. [old English] b. Maria, vehicle for taking prisoners from& to gaol; b. monk, Benedictine; b. pudding, sausage-shaped of blood, suet, &c.; B. Rod, gentleman usher of Lord Chamberlain\'s department, House of Lords, & Garter; b. sheep, scoundrel; blacksmith, smith working in iron (cf. WHITESMITH); blackthorn, thorny shrub bearing white flowers before leaves& small plums or sloes (blackthorn winter, time of its flowering, cold with NE winds), cudgel or walking stick of this; B. Watch, 42nd Highlanders Hence blackish (2) a., blackness n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. B. colour; b. paint, dye, varnish; b. speck; fungus, smut, in wheat &c.; particle of soot; b. cloth (es); negro or negrito, whence blacky n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Make b.; polish with BLACKING; b. out, obliterate. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. (also) kind of pimple on the skin; b.-water fever, W.-Afr. disease with bloody urine &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. Reflecting no light or true color; of the darkest hue. American pocket medical dictionary.
  71. Reflecting no light, colorless, opposite to white, Appleton's medical dictionary.
  72. n. The darkest colour, or destitution of colour;—a negro; a person who skin is black;—a black dress or mourning. Cabinet Dictionary
  73. Of the colour of night; dark; cloudy of countenance, sullen; horrible, wicked; dismal, mournful. Complete Dictionary
  74. A black colour; mourning; a blackamoor; that part of the eye which is black. Complete Dictionary

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