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Definitions of blind

  1. render unable to see Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. something that keeps things out or hinders sight; "they had just moved in and had not put up blinds yet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a hiding place sometimes used by hunters (especially duck hunters); "he waited impatiently in the blind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. something intended to misrepresent the true nature of an activity; "he wasn't sick--it was just a subterfuge"; "the holding company was just a blind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. people who have severe visual impairments; "he spent hours reading to the blind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. unable or unwilling to perceive or understand; "blind to a lover's faults"; "blind to the consequences of their actions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. not based on reason or evidence; "blind hatred"; "blind faith"; "unreasoning panic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. unable to see A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  9. make dim by comparison or conceal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. make blind by putting the eyes out; "The criminals were punished and blinded" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. Destitute of the sense of seeing, either by natural defect or by deprivation; without sight. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Not having the faculty of discernment; destitute of intellectual light; unable or unwilling to understand or judge; as, authors are blind to their own defects. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Undiscerning; undiscriminating; inconsiderate. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Having such a state or condition as a thing would have to a person who is blind; not well marked or easily discernible; hidden; unseen; concealed; as, a blind path; a blind ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Involved; intricate; not easily followed or traced. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Having no openings for light or passage; as, a blind wall; open only at one end; as, a blind alley; a blind gut. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Unintelligible, or not easily intelligible; as, a blind passage in a book; illegible; as, blind writing. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Abortive; failing to produce flowers or fruit; as, blind buds; blind flowers. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To make blind; to deprive of sight or discernment. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To deprive partially of vision; to make vision difficult for and painful to; to dazzle. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel; as a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Something to hinder sight or keep out light; a screen; a cover; esp. a hinged screen or shutter for a window; a blinder for a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A blindage. See Blindage. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A halting place. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Alt. of Blinde Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living. Medical Dictionary DB
  29. Without the sense of sight; sightless; unable to understand, judge, or realize; heedless; as, blind haste; hidden; closed at one end; as, a blind alley. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Anything which serves to obstruct vision, or hinders the passage of light; a window-shade; a hinged shutter for windows; a blinker on a horse's bridle; something to mislead the eye or the understanding; an ambush; a subterfuge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To deprive of sight; to make blind, mentally or morally; to hide. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Blindly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Inability to see; having no opening. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  34. Without sight: dark: ignorant or undiscerning: without an opening. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Something to mislead: a window-screen: a shade. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To make blind: to darken, obscure, or deceive: to dazzle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Destitute of sight; obscure; ignorant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. Something that darkens or deceives; a shade. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To make blind; darken; deceive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To make blind; screen; hide; eclipse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Destitute of sight; ignorant; inconsiderate; acting at random; illegible; unintelligible; hidden; obscure. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Something that obscures or shades; a shutter; a subterfuge; ruse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Destitute of the sense of sight destitute of vision of any kind, such as understanding or judgment; unseen; dark; obscure; heedless: inconsiderate; admitting no light; having no outlet. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. A window-screen; a blinker; something to mislead; reckless. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To deprive of sight; to darken; to deceive. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. Deprived of sight; wanting discernment; heedless; inconsiderate; morally depraved. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. Something that darkens or obscures; a cover or screen. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. Blind beggars are frequently mentioned ( Matthew 9:27 ; 12:22 ; 20:30 ; John 5:3 ). The blind are to be treated with compassion ( Leviticus 19:14 ; Deuteronomy 27:18 ). Blindness was sometimes a punishment for disobedience ( 1 Samuel 11:2 ; Jeremiah 39:7 ), sometimes the effect of old age ( Genesis 27:1 ; 1 Kings 14:4 ; 1 Samuel 4:15 ). Conquerors sometimes blinded their captives ( 2 Kings 25:7 ; 1 Samuel 11:2 ). Blindness denotes ignorance as to spiritual things ( Isaiah 6:10 ; Isaiah 42:18 Isaiah 42:19 ; Matthew 15:14 ; Ephesians 4:18 ). The opening of the eyes of the blind is peculiar to the Messiah ( Isaiah 29:18 ). Elymas was smitten with blindness at Paul's word ( Acts 13:11 ). biblestudytools.com
  49. One who is deprived of the sense or faculty of sight. See Pol. Code Cal. 1903, thelawdictionary.org
  50. One who is deprived of the faculty of seeing. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  51. Persons who are blind may enter into contracts and make wills like others. Carth. 53; Barn. 19, 23; 3 Leigh, R. 32. When an attesting witness becomes blind, his handwriting may be proved as if he were dead. 1 Stark. Ev. 341. But before proving his handwriting the witness must be produced, if within the jurisdiction of the court, and examined. Ld. Raym. 734; 1 M. & Rob. 258; 2 M. & Rob. 262. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. bl[=i]nd, adj. without sight: dark: ignorant or undiscerning: without an opening.--n. something to mislead: a window-screen: a shade.--v.t. to make blind; to darken, obscure, or deceive; to dazzle.--pa.p. bl[=i]nd'ed; pr.p. bl[=i]nd'ing.--ns. BLIND'AGE (mil.) a temporary wooden screen faced with earth as a protection against splinters of shell and the like; BLIND'-COAL, non-bituminous coal.--adj. BLIND'ED, deprived of sight: without intellectual discernment.--n. BLIND'ER, one who or that which blinds; (pl.) a horse's blinkers.--adj. BLIND'FOLD, having the eyes bandaged, so as not to see: thoughtless: reckless.--v.t. to cover the eyes: to mislead.--adj. BLIND'ING, tending to make blind.--pr.p. making blind.--adv. BLIND'LY.--ns. BLIND'NESS, want of sight, ignorance, folly; BLIND'-SIDE, the side on which a person is blind to danger: weak point; BLIND'WORM, a small reptile, like a snake, having eyes so small as to be supposed blind.--BLIND-MAN'S BUFF, a game in which one of the party is blindfolded and tries to catch the others. [A.S. blind; Ice. blindr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Without sight; without foresight, discernment, or moral or intellectual light (b. to, incapable of appreciating; one\'s b. side, direction in which one is unguarded); reckless; mechanical, not ruled by purpose, (b. forces); hard to trace (b. track); (Post Office) b. letter, man, reader, of ill-addressed letters and the officials dealing with them; concealed (b. ditch; b.-stitch, sewing visible only on one side, also as v.t. & i. sew thus); b. door &c., walled up; closed at one end (b. alley); b. hazard, hookey, card-games; b.-man\'s-buff, game in which blindfold player tries to catch others, who push him about; b.-story, triforium below clerestory admitting no light; b. man\'s holiday, time before candles are lighted; b. coal, burning without flame, anthracite; b.-worm, =SLOW-worm (f. small size of eyes). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Deprive of sight permanently or temporarily; rob of judgment, deceive. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. Obstruction to sight or light; screen for window, esp. on roller (Venetian b., of laths running on webbing); (Fortif.) =foll.; pretext, stalking-horse. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. Not having the sense of sight. American pocket medical dictionary.
  57. Destitute of the faculty of sight. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  58. Terminating without any open communication (e. g., the cecum). Appleton's medical dictionary.
  59. n. Something to hinder sight or keep out light; a screen;—something to mislead the eye or the understanding; a pretext. Cabinet Dictionary
  60. Without sight, dark; intellectually dark; unseen, private; dark, obscure. Complete Dictionary
  61. Something to hinder the sight; something to mislead. Complete Dictionary

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