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Definitions of blind

  1. To make blind; to deprive of sight or discernment. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To deprive partially of vision; to make vision difficult for and painful to; to dazzle. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel; as a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To deprive of sight; to make blind, mentally or morally; to hide. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To make blind: to darken, obscure, or deceive: to dazzle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To make blind; darken; deceive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To make blind; screen; hide; eclipse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. render unable to see Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. make dim by comparison or conceal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. make blind by putting the eyes out; "The criminals were punished and blinded" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. To deprive of sight; to darken; to deceive. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. a hiding place sometimes used by hunters (especially duck hunters); "he waited impatiently in the blind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. people who have severe visual impairments; "he spent hours reading to the blind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. Something to hinder sight or keep out light; a screen; a cover; esp. a hinged screen or shutter for a window; a blinder for a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A blindage. See Blindage. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A halting place. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Alt. of Blinde Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Anything which serves to obstruct vision, or hinders the passage of light; a window-shade; a hinged shutter for windows; a blinker on a horse's bridle; something to mislead the eye or the understanding; an ambush; a subterfuge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Something to mislead: a window-screen: a shade. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Something that darkens or deceives; a shade. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. Something that obscures or shades; a shutter; a subterfuge; ruse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A window-screen; a blinker; something to mislead; reckless. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Something that darkens or obscures; a cover or screen. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. Blindly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. unable or unwilling to perceive or understand; "blind to a lover's faults"; "blind to the consequences of their actions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. not based on reason or evidence; "blind hatred"; "blind faith"; "unreasoning panic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. Destitute of the sense of seeing, either by natural defect or by deprivation; without sight. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Not having the faculty of discernment; destitute of intellectual light; unable or unwilling to understand or judge; as, authors are blind to their own defects. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Undiscerning; undiscriminating; inconsiderate. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Having such a state or condition as a thing would have to a person who is blind; not well marked or easily discernible; hidden; unseen; concealed; as, a blind path; a blind ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Involved; intricate; not easily followed or traced. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Having no openings for light or passage; as, a blind wall; open only at one end; as, a blind alley; a blind gut. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Unintelligible, or not easily intelligible; as, a blind passage in a book; illegible; as, blind writing. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Abortive; failing to produce flowers or fruit; as, blind buds; blind flowers. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Without the sense of sight; sightless; unable to understand, judge, or realize; heedless; as, blind haste; hidden; closed at one end; as, a blind alley. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. Without sight: dark: ignorant or undiscerning: without an opening. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Destitute of sight; obscure; ignorant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. Destitute of sight; ignorant; inconsiderate; acting at random; illegible; unintelligible; hidden; obscure. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Destitute of the sense of sight destitute of vision of any kind, such as understanding or judgment; unseen; dark; obscure; heedless: inconsiderate; admitting no light; having no outlet. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. Deprived of sight; wanting discernment; heedless; inconsiderate; morally depraved. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for blind?

Usage examples for blind

  1. The coming down to Ecclesborough may have been all a blind – The Chestermarke Instinct by J. S. Fletcher
  2. Your eyes blind me; how wonderful they are! – The Mayor of Warwick by Herbert M. Hopkins
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