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Definitions of blow

  1. To make a current of air; to pant; to sound as a horn by being blown; to flower; to blossom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To bloom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To cause to blossom; to put forth (blossoms or flowers). Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause air to pass through by the action of the mouth, or otherwise; to cause to sound, as a wind instrument; as, to blow a trumpet; to blow an organ. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To clear of contents by forcing air through; as, to blow an egg; to blow one's nose. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To spread by report; to publish; to disclose. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To form by inflation; to swell by injecting air; as, to blow bubbles; to blow glass. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To inflate, as with pride; to puff up. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue; as, to blow a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To deposit eggs or larvae upon, or in (meat, etc.). Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To burst, shatter, or destroy by an explosion; - usually with up, down, open, or similar adverb; as, to blow up a building. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To drive a current of air upon; to send forward or impel by a current of air; to cause to sound by forcing air through, as a whistle; to clear by forcing air through; form by forcing air into, as bubbles; put out of breath by fatigue; scatter or shatter by explosives. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To drive air upon or into: to drive by a current of air: to sound as a wind instrument:-pa.t. blew (bloo); pa.p. blown. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To drive by wind; force wind into or against. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. To move or affect by a current of air; inflate, as molten glass; sound, as a trumpet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. To put out of breath. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To lay eggs in, as flies in meat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. To flower; to blossom; to bloom. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To produce a current of air; to move, as air, esp. to move rapidly or with power; as, the wind blows. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To send forth a forcible current of air, as from the mouth or from a pair of bellows. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To sound on being blown into, as a trumpet. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To spout water, etc., from the blowholes, as a whale. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To be carried or moved by the wind; as, the dust blows in from the street. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To talk loudly; to boast; to storm. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To blossom; to flower; to move, as air, at different rates of speed and force; to pant; to breathe quickly; to sound by having air forced into, as a whistle; to spout water. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To bloom or blossom:-pr.p. blowing; pa.p. blown. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To produce a current of air: to move, as air or the wind. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To blossom. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To produce a current of air; to pant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. be blowing or storming; "The wind blew from the West" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. exhale hard; "blow on the soup to cool it down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  36. free of obstruction by blowing air through; "blow one's nose" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  37. burst suddenly; "The tire blew"; "We blew a tire" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  38. shape by blowing; "Blow a glass vase" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  39. show off Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  40. leave; informal or rude; "shove off!"; "The children shoved along"; "Blow now!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  41. spend lavishly or wastefully on; "He blew a lot of money on his new home theater" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  42. To emit a current, as of air; move in or be carried by the wind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. To sound by being blown. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. To pant; be winded. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To drive a current of air upon; to drive by a current of air; to put out of breath: to inflate with air; to puff up; to sound a wind instrument; to spread by report; to taint by depositing eggs upon, as flies; to shatter by explosives.; to come to blossom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To move as air; to pant or puff; to throw or drive a current of air into or upon; to warm by the breath; to deposit eggs as flies. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. To come into flower; to show flower. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. Blowing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. Blown. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. forceful exhalation through the nose or mouth; "he gave his nose a loud blow"; "he blew out all the candles with a single puff" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  51. a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  52. an unfortunate happening that hinders of impedes; something that is thwarting or frustrating Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  53. street names for cocaine Wordnet Dictionary DB
  54. allow to regain its breath; "blow a horse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. cause to be revealed and jeopardized; "The story blew their cover"; "The double agent was blown by the other side" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. lay eggs; "certain insects are said to blow" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. cause air to go in, on, or through; "Blow my hair dry" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. play or sound a wind instrument; "She blew the horn" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. make a sound as if blown; "The whistle blew" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. sound by having air expelled through a tube; "The trumpets blew" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  61. A blossom; a flower; also, a state of blossoming; a mass of blossoms. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. A forcible stroke with the hand, fist, or some instrument, as a rod, a club, an ax, or a sword. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. The infliction of evil; a sudden calamity; something which produces mental, physical, or financial suffering or loss (esp. when sudden); a buffet. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. A blowing, esp., a violent blowing of the wind; a gale; as, a heavy blow came on, and the ship put back to port. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. The act of forcing air from the mouth, or through or from some instrument; as, to give a hard blow on a whistle or horn; to give the fire a blow with the bellows. Webster Dictionary DB
  67. The spouting of a whale. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. A single heat or operation of the Bessemer converter. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. An egg, or a larva, deposited by a fly on or in flesh, or the act of depositing it. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. A flower; a blossom; a blast; a gale of wind; an egg laid by a fly; the spouting of a whale; a stroke with the hand or with a weapon; an act of enmity; a sudden shock or misfortune. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  71. A stroke or knock: a sudden misfortune or calamity. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  72. A stroke; sudden shock or calamity. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  73. A sudden or violent stroke; thump; shock; calamity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  74. The act of blowing; a blast. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  75. The egg of a fly; a flyblow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  76. The state of flowering; a mass of blossoms. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. A stroke; an act of hostility; a sudden calamity; the blossoms; the bloom; a gale of wind; breath; an ovum or egg deposited by a fly. To blow hot and cold, to vacillate: to side now with one party, now with the other. To blow over, to pass away without effect; to subside. To blow up, to be broken and scattered by the explosion of gunpowder. To blow out, to extinguish by blowing upon; to scatter, as by a pistol-shot. To blow up, to inflate; to kindle; to burst or scatter by the explosion of gunpowder; to bring to nought suddenly; to scold. To blow upon, to make stale or common, as a passage in a writer; to speak ill of; to regard as worthless; to divulge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  78. A stroke; first act of hostility; a sudden calamity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  79. Blew. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for blow

  1. It was a blow to him that we had no news to give; and it was hard even to offer advice. – The Brightener by C. N. Williamson A. M. Williamson
  2. She knew that blow would tell. – Flamsted quarries by Mary E. Waller
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