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Definitions of bolt

  1. run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (informal) directly; "he ran bang into the pole"; "ran slap into her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. leave suddenly and as if in a hurry; "The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas"; "When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a sudden abandonment (as from a political party) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of moving with great haste; "he made a dash for the door" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a screw that screws into a nut to form a fastener Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the part of a lock that is engaged or withdrawn with a key Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a sliding bar in a breech-loading firearm that ejects an empty cartridge and replaces it and closes the breech Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a roll of cloth or wallpaper of a definite length Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a discharge of lightning accompanied by thunder Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. in a rigid manner; "the body was rigidly erect"; "ge sat bolt upright" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. eat hastily without proper chewing; "Don't bolt your food!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. secure or lock with a bolt; "bolt the door" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. make or roll into bolts; "bolt fabric" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. swallow hastily Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. move or jump suddenly; "She bolted from her seat" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. directly; "he ran bang into the pole"; "ran slap into her" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a short, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Lightning; a thunderbolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A strong pin, of iron or other material, used to fasten or hold something in place, often having a head at one end and screw thread cut upon the other end. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A sliding catch, or fastening, as for a door or gate; the portion of a lock which is shot or withdrawn by the action of the key. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A compact package or roll of cloth, as of canvas or silk, often containing about forty yards. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A bundle, as of oziers. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To shoot; to discharge or drive forth. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To swallow without chewing; as, to bolt food. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To refuse to support, as a nomination made by a party to which one has belonged or by a caucus in which one has taken part. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To fasten or secure with, or as with, a bolt or bolts, as a door, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To start forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; to come or go suddenly; to dart; as, to bolt out of the room. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To spring suddenly aside, or out of the regular path; as, the horse bolted. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or a caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. In the manner of a bolt; suddenly; straight; unbendingly. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A sudden spring or start; a sudden spring aside; as, the horse made a bolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A sudden flight, as to escape creditors. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To sift or separate the coarser from the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A sieve, esp. a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; - with out. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. A short, thick arrow with a blunt head; a stream of lightning, so called from its darting like an arrow; a stout pin or rod or iron or some other metal, usually with a permanent head at one end, used for holding objects together; a sliding catch for securing a door, gate, etc.; the portion of a lock shot or withdrawn by the key; a shackle; a sudden departure; a roll or certain length, as of cloth; in United States politics, a refusal to support a nomination made by one's party, or withdrawal from one's party. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Directly; suddenly; straight, as bolt upright. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. Expel with force; cause to spring forth; fasten or secure with a sliding catch; blurt out; swallow hurriedly or without chewing; in United States politics, to withdraw from (a party), or decline to support (a candidate); to sift or separate the coarser particles from; as, to bolt flour; hence, to examine with care; separate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. To shoot forth or fall suddenly; to depart with suddenness; to start and run away; in United States politics, to refuse to support the policy or the nominee of a party. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. A bar or pin used to fasten a door, etc.; an arrow; a thunderbolt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. To fasten with a bolt: to throw or utter precipitately: to swallow hastily. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. To rush away (like a bolt from a bow): to start off suddenly, said originally of a horse starting from his course, afterwards applied to politicians who suddenly desert their party: as to bolt the nomination of an objectionable candidate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. To sift, to separate the bran from, as flour: to examine by sifting: to sift through coarse cloth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. A bar or pin to fasten a door; an arrow; flash of lightning; piece of canvas or rope. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To dart forth; run away. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. To fasten with a bolt; sift; swallow hastily. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. To fasten with a bolt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. To refuse to support, as a candidate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. To swallow hurriedly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. To expel; blurt out. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. To run away, as a horse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To repudiate a party measure or candidate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. To sift; examine as by sifting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. A sliding bar for fastening a door, etc.; any pin or rod used for fastening. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. An arrow; a long shot for a cannon; anything coming suddenly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. Desertion of a party, candidate, or policy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. A sudden start, or runaway. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. A roll, as of cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. A rotating frame for sifting flour. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. Like an arrow; swiftly; straight. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. An arrow; a stout pin of iron or other metal: an elongated bullet: a thunderbolt; a stream of lightning; a sudden start; the act of bolting food. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  69. To fasten with a bolt; to secure; to blurt out: to swallow hastily. Among sportsmen, to start or dislodge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. To sift; to separate bran from flour; to examine by sifting; to purify; to discuss or argue. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. To dart forth, or off; to run away; to desert one's party suddenly. A bolt of canvas, a piece of 28 ells. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. An arrow; a dart; a small round bar of wood or metal; a stream of lighthing; a meteoric stone. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. To fasten with a bolt; to make secure; to utter or throw out precipitately; boltsprit, same as bowsprit, which see; bolt-upright, Perpendicular; perfectly upright. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  74. To separate the bran from the flour by shaking the mass backwards and forwards in a cloth of loose texture. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; -- with out. mso.anu.edu.au
  76. The desertion by one or more persons from the political party to which he or they belong; the permanent withdrawal before adjournment of a portion of the delegates to a political convention. Rap. & L. thelawdictionary.org
  77. To swallow without chewing; as, to bolt food; often used with down. dictgcide_fs
  78. To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; with out. dictgcide_fs
  79. b[=o]lt, n. a bar or pin used to fasten a door, &c.: an arrow: a thunderbolt, as in 'a bolt from the blue.'--v.t. to fasten with a bolt: to throw or utter precipitately: to expel suddenly: to swallow hastily.--v.i. to rush away (like a bolt from a bow): to start up: (U.S.) to break away from one's political party.--ns. BOLT'-HEAD, the head of a bolt: a chemical flask; BOLT'-ROPE, a rope sewed all round the edge of a sail to prevent it from tearing; BOLT'SPRIT (same as BOWSPRIT).--adv. BOLT'-UP'RIGHT, upright and straight as a bolt or arrow.--n. BOLT'-UP'RIGHTNESS. [A.S. bolt; Old High Ger. bolz.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  80. b[=o]lt, v.t. (better spelling, BOULT), to sift, to separate the bran from, as flour: to examine by sifting: to sift through coarse cloth.--ns. BOLT'ER, a sieve: a machine for separating bran from flour; BOLT'ING, the process by which anything is bolted or sifted; BOLT'ING-HUTCH, a hutch or large box into which flour falls when it is bolted. [O. Fr. bulter, or buleter = bureter, from bure--Low L. burra, a coarse reddish-brown cloth--Gr. pyrros, reddish.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  81. Used, at times, for to swallow without chewing,-as to "bolt one's food." Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  82. Short heavy arrow of crossbow, quarrel, (fool\'s b. soon shot, soon speaks and is soon silenced); discharge of lightning (b. from the blue, complete surprise); door-fastening of sliding bar& staple, sliding piece of lock; headed metal pin for holding things together, usu. riveted or with nut; (as measure) roll of canvas &c., bundle of osiers; b.-rope, round sail-edge to prevent tearing. [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  83. Dart off or away, (horse) break from control; gulp down unchewed; fasten (door &c.) with b., b. in or out, shut in, exclude, by bolting door; fasten together with bolts. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  84. Sudden start; running away. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  85. (With upright) =as a bolt, quite. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  86. Sift; investigate. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  87. n. [Anglo-Saxon] An arrow; a dart;—a strong pin, used to fasten or hold something in place;—a thunder-bolt;—a shackle;—twenty-eight ells of canvas. Cabinet Dictionary
  88. adv. With sudden meeting or collision. Cabinet Dictionary
  89. An arrow, a dart; a thunderbolt; Bold uptight, that is, upright as an arrow; the bar of a door; an iron to fasten the legs; a spot or stain. Complete Dictionary

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