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Definitions of book

  1. a record in which commercial accounts are recorded; "they got a subpoena to examine our books" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the sacred writings of the Christian religion; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. register in a hotel booker Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a number of sheets (ticket or stamps etc.) bound together on one edge; "he bought a book of stamps" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a major division of a long written composition; "the book of Isaiah" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a copy of a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together); "I am reading a good book on economics" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. sacred writings of Islam revealed by God to the prophet Mohammed during his life at Mecca and Medina; divided into 114 chapters Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a compilation of the known facts regarding something or someone; "Al Smith used to say, `Let's look at the record'"; "his name is in all the recordbooks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a written version of a play or other dramatic composition; used in preparing for a performance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a collection of rules or prescribed standards on the basis of which decisions are made; "they run things by the book around here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. engage for a performance; "Her agent had booked her for several concerts in Tokyo" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. arrange for and reserve (something for someone else) in advance; "reserve me a seat on a flight"; "The agent booked tickets to the show for the whole family"; "please hold a table at Maxim's" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together); "I am reading a good book on economics" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. the sacred writings of the Christian religions; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. the sacred writings of Islam revealed by God to the prophet Muhammad during his life at Mecca and Medina Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. record a charge in a police register; "The policeman booked her when she tried to solicit a man" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A composition, written or printed; a treatise. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of whist; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To enter, write, or register in a book or list. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To mark out for; to destine or assign for; as, he is booked for the valedictory. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of Paradise Lost. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A collection of sheets of paper and other material, blank, written, or printed, bound together in a volume; a composition of some length on a particular subject, printed and bound; a division, section, or part of a literary composition; a register or record; in card playing, a certain number of tricks held by one side; in horse-racing, a list of horses entered and the bets laid on them; Book, the Bible. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To enter or register, as to book an order. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A collection of sheets of paper bound together, either printed, written on, or blank: a literary composition: a division of a volume or subject. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To write in a book. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. A bound assemblage of leaves; a volume; division of a literary work. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To register in a book. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To enter in a book; engage beforehand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A number of sheets of paper bound or stitched together; a printed and bound volume. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A treatise, or one of its subdivisions. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A collection of sheets printed on, written on, or blank, and bound in a volume; a literary composition, or one of its larger divisions; a writing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To enter, write, or register in a book; to get booked. In books, in kind remembrance: in favour. Without book, by memory; without authority. To bring to book, to require to give an exact reckoning. To speak by book, to speak on accurate knowledge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. Printed sheets of paper stitched and bound together; a volume or part of a volume; a division. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. To enter or write in a book. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. This word has a comprehensive meaning in Scripture. In the Old Testament it is the rendering of the Hebrew word sepher , which properly means a "writing," and then a "volume" ( Exodus 17:14 ; Deuteronomy 28:58 ; 29:20 ; Job 19:23 ) or "roll of a book" ( Jeremiah 36:2 Jeremiah 36:4 ). Books were originally written on skins, on linen or cotton cloth, and on Egyptian papyrus, whence our word "paper." The leaves of the book were generally written in columns, designated by a Hebrew word properly meaning "doors" and "valves" ( Jeremiah 36:23 , RSV, marg. "columns"). Among the Hebrews books were generally rolled up like our maps, or if very long they were rolled from both ends, forming two rolls ( Luke 4:17-20 ). Thus they were arranged when the writing was on flexible materials; but if the writing was on tablets of wood or brass or lead, then the several tablets were bound together by rings through which a rod was passed. A sealed book is one whose contents are secret ( Isaiah 29:11 ; Revelation 5:1-3 ). To "eat" a book ( Jeremiah 15:16 ; Ezekiel 2:8-10 ; 3:1-3 ; Revelation 10:9 ) is to study its contents carefully. The book of judgment ( Daniel 7:10 ) refers to the method of human courts of justice as illustrating the proceedings which will take place at the day of God's final judgment. The book of the wars of the Lord ( Numbers 21:14 ), the book of Jasher ( Joshua 10:13 ), and the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah and Israel ( 2 Chronicles 25:26 ), were probably ancient documents known to the Hebrews, but not forming a part of the canon. The book of life ( Psalms 69:28 ) suggests the idea that as the redeemed form a community or citizenship (Phil 3:20 ; 4:3 ), a catalogue of the citizens' names is preserved ( Luke 10:20 ; Revelation 20:15 ). Their names are registered in heaven ( Luke 10:20 ; Revelation 3:5 ). The book of the covenant ( Exodus 24:7 ), containing Exodus 20:22-23:33, , is the first book actually mentioned as a part of the written word. It contains a series of laws, civil, social, and religious, given to Moses at Sinai immediately after the delivery of the decalogue. These were written in this "book." biblestudytools.com
  40. 1. A general designation applied to any literary composition which is printed, but appropriately to a printed composition bound in a volume. Scoville v. Toland, 21 Fed. Cas. 864. 2. A bound volume consisting of sheets of paper, not printed, but containing manu script entries; such as a merchant's account-books, dockets of courts, etc. 3. A name often giveu to the largest subdivisions of a treatise or other literary composition. 4. In practice, the name of "book" Is given to several of the more important papers prepared in the progress of a cause, though entirely written, and not at all in the book form; such as deinurrer-books, error-books, paper-books, etc. In copyright law, the meaning of the term is more extensive than in popular usage, for it may include a pamphlet, a magazine, a collection of blank forms, or a single sheet of music or of ordinary printing. U. S. v. Bennett, 24 Fed. Cas. 1,093; Stowe v. Thomas, 23 Fed. Cas. 207; White v. Geroch, 2 Barn. & Aid. 301 ; Brightley v. Littleton (C. C.) 37 Fed. 104; Holmes v. Hurst, 174 II. S. 82, 19 Sup. Ct. 600. 43 L. Ed. 904; Clement! v. Goulding, 11 East 244; Clayton v. Stone, 5 Fed. Cas. 999. thelawdictionary.org
  41. A general name given to every literary composition which is printed; but appropriately to a printed composition bound in a volume. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  42. The copyright, (q. v.) or exclusive right to print and publish a book, may be secured to the author and his assigns for the term of twenty-eight years; and, if the author be living, and a citizen of the United States, or resident therein, the same right shall be continued to him for the further term of fourteen years, by complying with the conditions of the act of Congress; one of which is, that he shall, within three months after publication, deliver, or cause to be delivered, a copy of the same to the clerk of the said district. Act of February 3, 1831. 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story's L. U. S. 2223. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  43. 1. e-book.2. book titles.3. MacBook.4. O'Reilly and Associates. foldoc_fs
  44. A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of . dictgcide_fs
  45. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.; often used in the plural; as, they got a subpoena to examine our books. dictgcide_fs
  46. Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of bridge or whist, being the minimum number of tricks that must be taken before any additional tricks are counted as part of the score for that hand; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set. dictgcide_fs
  47. a set of paper objects (tickets, stamps, matches, checks etc.) bound together by one edge, like a book; as, he bought a book of stamps. dictgcide_fs
  48. a book or list, actual or hypothetical, containing records of the best performances in some endeavor; a recordbook; used in the phrase one for the book or one for the books. dictgcide_fs
  49. the set of facts about an athlete's performance, such as typical performance or playing habits or methods, that are accumulated by potential opponents as an aid in deciding how best to compete against that athlete; as, the book on Ted Williams suggests pitching to him low and outside. dictgcide_fs
  50. same as book value. dictgcide_fs
  51. the list of current buy and sell orders maintained by a stock market specialist. dictgcide_fs
  52. the purchase orders still outstanding and unfilled on a company's ledger; as, book to bill ratio. dictgcide_fs
  53. To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; to reserve{2}; also, to make an arrangement for a reservation; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater; to book a reservation at a restaurant. dictgcide_fs
  54. To make an official record of a charge against (a suspect in a crime); performed by police. dictgcide_fs
  55. book, n. a collection of sheets of paper bound together, either printed, written on, or blank: a literary composition: a division of a volume or subject: the Bible: a betting-book, or record of bets made with different people: (fig.) any source of instruction: the libretto of an opera, &c.: (pl.) formal accounts of transactions, as minutes of meetings, records kept of his business by a merchant.--v.t. to write in a book.--ns. BOOK'-ACCOUNT', an account of debt or credit in a book; BOOK'BINDER, one who binds books; BOOK'BINDING, the art or practice of binding or putting the boards on books; BOOK'-CASE, a case with shelves for books; BOOK'-CLUB, an association of persons who buy new books for circulation among themselves; BOOK'-DEBT, a debt for articles charged by the seller in his book-account.--adj. BOOK'FUL, full of information gathered from books.--ns. BOOK'-HOLD'ER, one who holds the book of the play and prompts the actor in the theatre; BOOK'-HUNT'ER, one who rejoices in discovering rare books; BOOK'ING-OF'FICE, an office where names are booked or tickets are taken.--adj. BOOK'ISH, fond of books: acquainted only with books.--ns. BOOK'ISHNESS; BOOK'-KEEP'ING, the art of keeping accounts in a regular and systematic manner; BOOK'-LAND, land taken from the folcland or common land, and granted by bóc or written charter to a private owner; BOOK'-LEARN'ING, learning got from books, as opposed to practical knowledge.--adj. BOOK'LESS, without books, unlearned.--ns. BOOK'LET, a small book; BOOK'-MAK'ER, one who makes up books from the writings of others, a compiler: one who makes a system of bets in such a way that the gains must exceed the losses, entering them in a memorandum book; BOOK'-MAK'ING, the art or practice of compiling books from the writings of others: compilation: systematic betting; BOOK'-MAN, a scholar, student; BOOK'-MARK, something placed in a book to mark a particular page or passage; BOOK'-MATE (Shak.), a mate or companion in the study of books: a schoolfellow; BOOK'-MUS'LIN, muslin used in bookbinding; BOOK'-OATH (Shak.), an oath made on the Book or Bible; BOOK'PLATE, a label usually pasted inside the cover of a book, bearing the owner's name, crest, coat-of-arms, or peculiar device; BOOK'-POST, the department in the Post-office for the transmission of books; BOOK'SELLER, one who sells books; BOOK'SELLING; BOOK'SHELF, a shelf on which books are placed; BOOK'SHOP, a shop where books are sold; BOOK'-STALL, a stall or stand, generally in the open air, where books are sold; BOOK'-STAND, a book-stall: a stand or support for holding up a book when reading; BOOK'-TRADE, the trade of dealing in books; BOOK'WORM, a worm or mite that eats holes in books: a hard reader: one who reads without discrimination or profit.--TO BE UPON THE BOOKS, to have one's name in an official list; TO BRING TO BOOK, to bring to account; TO TAKE A LEAF OUT OF ANOTHER'S BOOK, to follow the example of some one; TO TALK LIKE A BOOK, to talk pedantically, or in a preternaturally well-informed manner. [A.S. bóc, a book, the beech; Ger. buche, the beech, buch, a book, because the Teutons first wrote on beechen boards.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. Portable written or printed treatise filling a number of sheets fastened together (forming roll, or usu. with sheets sewn or pasted hingewise& enclosed in cover); literary composition that would fill such a set of sheets (or several) if printed; (fig.) anything from which one may learn, also imaginary record, list, &c., (b. of fate; b. of life, list of those who shall be saved); the Bible (esp. swear on the b.); main division of treatise or poem (Bk I &c.), or of Bible (B. of Genesis); =LIBRETTO; back-hinged set of blank sheets for writing accounts, notes, exercises, &c., in (pl., merchant\'s accounts); (Turf) one\'s bets on a race or at a meeting; set of tickets, stamps, cheques, tricks at whist, &c., bound up or collected. B. of reference, not read continuously but used intermittently for information; speak by the, like a, b., in formal phrases, or with correct information; take a leaf out of -\'s b., imitate him; without b., without authority, from memory; on the bb., entered in list of members &c. (so take one\'s name off the bb.); in -\'s bad or black, good, bb., in disfavour or favour with him; bring to b., call to account. Bookbinder, -ding, binder, binding, of bb.; bookcase, case containing bookshelves; b.-keeper, -ping, one who keeps, art of keeping, the accounts of a merchant, public office, &c.; b.-learning or -lore, -learned, mere theory, knowing bb. but not life, so bookish a., bookishly adv., bookishness n.; b-maker, -king, compiler, compiling, of bb. (esp. for mercenary motives), also professional betting man or bookie n., his profession; bookman, literary man; b.-mark (er), thing to keep place in b.; b.-muslin, fine kind folded in booklike way when sold; b.-plate, label with owner\'s name, crest, &c, for pasting into bb.; b.-rest, adjustable support for b. on table; bookseller; b.-slide, expanding stand for a few bb.; b.-work, study of rules or text-bb. (opp. to working sums, chemical analysis, &c.); bookworm, maggot eating its way through bb., person devoted to reading. Hence booklet n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Enter in book or list; engage (seat &c.) by previous payment, (guest, supporter, &c.) for some occasion; enter name of (person engaging seat &c.), issue railway ticket to; take railway ticket; give, take down, address of (goods to be transmitted); I\'m booked, caught, cannot escape; booking-clerk, -office, person, place, for buying tickets from. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. won\'t suit my b., my plans. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together;—a literary composition, written or printed;—a subdivision of a literary work;—a volume in which accounts are kept. Cabinet Dictionary
  60. A volume in which we read or write; a particular part of a work; the register in which a trader keeps an account; In books, in kind remembrance; Without book, by memory. Complete Dictionary

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