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Definitions of boom

  1. To rush, as a ship under a press of sail; to sound with a boom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To sound with a deep, resonant tone; rush onward impetuously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To push forward; advance with a rush; gain rapidly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To extend, or push, with a boom or pole; as, to boom out a sail; to boom off a boat. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To cause to advance rapidly in price; as, to boom railroad or mining shares; to create a boom for; as to boom Mr. C. for senator. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To make a loud hollow noise; rush with violence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To control or confine by means of a boom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To cry with a hollow note; to make a hollow sound, as the bittern, and some insects. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To make a hollow sound, as of waves or cannon. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To rush with violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To have a rapid growth in market value or in popular favor; to go on rushingly. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To make a deep, hollow sound; to grow rapidly in value, population, or popular esteem. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To make a hollow sound or roar. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. grow stronger; "The economy was booming" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. make a resonant sound; as of artillery; "His deep voice boomed through the hall." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To sound loud and dull like a gun; to roll and roar; to rush quickly, as a ship through the water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. any of various more-or-less horizontal spars or poles used to extend the foot of a sail or for handling cargo or in mooring Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a deep prolonged loud noise Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a state of economic prosperity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. make a resonant sound, like artillery; "His deep voice boomed through the hall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. A long pole or spar, run out for the purpose of extending the bottom of a particular sail; as, the jib boom, the studding-sail boom, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A long spar or beam, projecting from the mast of a derrick, from the outer end of which the body to be lifted is suspended. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A pole with a conspicuous top, set up to mark the channel in a river or harbor. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A strong chain cable, or line of spars bound together, extended across a river or the mouth of a harbor, to obstruct navigation or passage. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A line of connected floating timbers stretched across a river, or inclosing an area of water, to keep saw logs, etc., from floating away. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A hollow roar, as of waves or cannon; also, the hollow cry of the bittern; a booming. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; -- applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A long pole or spar run out to extend the bottom of a sail; a deep, hollow sound; a sudden demand for something on sale, accompanied by a rapid rise in price; as, the increased use of automobiles caused a boom in rubber and gasoline; a rapid growth in population. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. A pole by which a sail is stretched: a chain or bar stretched across a harbor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. A hollow roar, as of the sea, the cry of the bittern, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A spar to extend a foreand-alt sail; piece of timber to obstruct ships or floating bodies. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. A deep, reverberating sound, as of a cannon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A spar holding the foot of a fore-and-aft sail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A chain of logs to confine floating logs, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A torrent; sudden activity or prosperity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A long pole or spar to extend a sail; a strong iron chain, line of spars, or other bar, extended across a river, or barbour mouth, to obstruct the passage; a pole set up as a mark in a channel to direct seamen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. A hollow sound, as of waves, &c.; a sudden and increasing demand for a thing; a sudden outburst of popular favour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. A long pole or spar used in a ship to stretch out any particular sail at the bottom; a chain, a rope, spars, or some other obstacle placed across a river or harbour to prevent the entry or approach of hostile ships. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. A hollow roar, as shot rushing through the air. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for boom?

Usage examples for boom

  1. Not only did their property turn out to be of great and lasting value, but during their absence the Springbok Mine began to boom – A Mysterious Disappearance by Gordon Holmes
  2. What I wanted to know was the why behind the boom – Alec Lloyd, Cowpuncher by Eleanor Gates
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