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Definitions of boom

  1. hit hard; "He smashed a 3-run homer" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a sudden happening that brings very good fortune Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. be the case that thunder is being heard; "Whenever it thunders, my dog crawls under the bed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any of various more-or-less horizontal spars or poles used to extend the foot of a sail or for handling cargo or in mooring Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a pole carrying an overhead microphone projected over a film or tv set Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a deep prolonged loud noise Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a state of economic prosperity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. grow stronger; "The economy was booming" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. make a deep hollow sound; "Her voice booms out the words of the song" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. make a resonant sound; as of artillery; "His deep voice boomed through the hall." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a sudden happening that brings good fortune (as a sudden opportunity to make money); "the demand for testing has created a boom for those unregulated laboratories where boxes of specimen jars are processed lik an assembly line" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. make a resonant sound, like artillery; "His deep voice boomed through the hall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A long pole or spar, run out for the purpose of extending the bottom of a particular sail; as, the jib boom, the studding-sail boom, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A long spar or beam, projecting from the mast of a derrick, from the outer end of which the body to be lifted is suspended. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A pole with a conspicuous top, set up to mark the channel in a river or harbor. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A strong chain cable, or line of spars bound together, extended across a river or the mouth of a harbor, to obstruct navigation or passage. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A line of connected floating timbers stretched across a river, or inclosing an area of water, to keep saw logs, etc., from floating away. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To extend, or push, with a boom or pole; as, to boom out a sail; to boom off a boat. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To cry with a hollow note; to make a hollow sound, as the bittern, and some insects. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To make a hollow sound, as of waves or cannon. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To rush with violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To have a rapid growth in market value or in popular favor; to go on rushingly. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A hollow roar, as of waves or cannon; also, the hollow cry of the bittern; a booming. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; -- applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To cause to advance rapidly in price; as, to boom railroad or mining shares; to create a boom for; as to boom Mr. C. for senator. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A long pole or spar run out to extend the bottom of a sail; a deep, hollow sound; a sudden demand for something on sale, accompanied by a rapid rise in price; as, the increased use of automobiles caused a boom in rubber and gasoline; a rapid growth in population. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To make a deep, hollow sound; to grow rapidly in value, population, or popular esteem. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To give forth with a hollow, resounding noise, usually with out; to cause to grow rapidly in value, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. A pole by which a sail is stretched: a chain or bar stretched across a harbor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To make a hollow sound or roar. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A hollow roar, as of the sea, the cry of the bittern, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A spar to extend a foreand-alt sail; piece of timber to obstruct ships or floating bodies. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To make a loud hollow noise; rush with violence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To sound with a deep, resonant tone; rush onward impetuously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A deep, reverberating sound, as of a cannon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To control or confine by means of a boom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A spar holding the foot of a fore-and-aft sail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A chain of logs to confine floating logs, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. To push forward; advance with a rush; gain rapidly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A torrent; sudden activity or prosperity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A long pole or spar to extend a sail; a strong iron chain, line of spars, or other bar, extended across a river, or barbour mouth, to obstruct the passage; a pole set up as a mark in a channel to direct seamen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A hollow sound, as of waves, &c.; a sudden and increasing demand for a thing; a sudden outburst of popular favour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To rush, as a ship under a press of sail; to sound with a boom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. A long pole or spar used in a ship to stretch out any particular sail at the bottom; a chain, a rope, spars, or some other obstacle placed across a river or harbour to prevent the entry or approach of hostile ships. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. To sound loud and dull like a gun; to roll and roar; to rush quickly, as a ship through the water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. A hollow roar, as shot rushing through the air. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. An inclosure formed upon the surface of a stream or other body of water, by means of piers and a chain of spars, for the purpose of collecting or storing logs or timber. Powers' Appeal, 125 Pa. 175, 17 Atl. 254, 11 Am. St. Rep. 882; Lumber Co. v. Green, 76 Mich. 320, 43 N. W. 576; Gasper v. Heimbach, 59 Minn. 102, 60 N. W. lOSO; Boom Corp. v. Whiting, 29 Me. 123. thelawdictionary.org
  48. A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee. dictgcide_fs
  49. To cause to advance rapidly in price; as, to boom railroad or mining shares; to create a boom Mr. C. for senator. dictgcide_fs
  50. b[=oo]m, n. a pole by which a sail is stretched: a chain or bar stretched across a harbour. [Dut. boom, a beam, a tree.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. b[=oo]m, v.i. to make a hollow sound or roar: to go on with a rush, to become suddenly prosperous.--v.t. to push anything into sudden prominence:--pa.p. boomed (b[=oo]md); pr.p. boom'ing.--n. a hollow roar, as of the sea, the cry of the bittern, &c.: a sudden increase of activity in business, or the like--often the direct consequence of puffing advertisements or less legitimate intrigues.--p.adj. BOOM'ING, rushing with violence. [From a Low Ger. root found in A.S. byme, a trumpet, Dut. bommen, to drum; like BOMB, of imit. origin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. Long spar with one end attached stretching sail-foot; floating barrier of timber across river or harbour mouth. [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. (Make) deep resonant sound; hum, buzz; (make) bittern\'s cry. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. (Show) sudden activity, development, (esp. of commercial ventures, prices, &c.); (win) sudden popularity for (an invention, cause, &c.) by advertising &c., launch with eclat. [United States] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. (Naut.) [Cf.] A long spar used to extend the foot of a sail. B. forwards, carry all possible sail. B. off, keep off with spars. To top one's B., start off. Booms of a ship. (Decks.) Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  56. Any obstacle across a river or harbour, for protection in war, as spars, an iron chain, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  57. n. [Saxon] A long pole or spar used for extending the bottom of sails;—a chain cable or connected line of spars extended across a river or other water;—a pole set up in shallow water, to mark out the channel;—a hollow roar, as of waves or cannon; the cry of the bittern. Cabinet Dictionary
  58. In sea-language, a long pole used to spread out the clue of the studding sail; a pole with bushes or baskets, set up as a mark to shew the sailors how to steer; a bar laid cross a harbour, to keep out the enemy. Complete Dictionary

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