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Definitions of boot

  1. compartment in an automobile that carries luggage or shopping or tools (`boot' is British usage) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a rush!"; "he does it for kicks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. kick; give a boot to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an instrument of torture that is used to crush the foot and leg Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. protective casing for something that resembles a leg Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cause to load (an operating system) and start the initial processes; "boot your computer" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. British term for the luggage compartment in a car Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Remedy; relief; amends; reparation; hence, one who brings relief. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Profit; gain; advantage; use. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. An apron or cover (of leather or rubber cloth) for the driving seat of a vehicle, to protect from rain and mud. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The metal casing and flange fitted about a pipe where it passes through a roof. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To put boots on, esp. for riding. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To punish by kicking with a booted foot. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To boot one's self; to put on one's boots. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Booty; spoil. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To profit; to advantage; to avail; - generally followed by it; as, what boots it? Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A leather covering for the foot and the lower part of the leg; that which is thrown in to persuade one to make a bargain, or to make an exchange equal; as, I will exchange my house for yours and give you one hundred dollars to boot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To profit; to benefit; as, it boots me nothing; to put boots on; kick with the boot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg generally made of leather: an old instrument of torture for the legs: a box or receptacle in a coach: n.pl. the servant in a hotel that cleans the boots. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To put on boots. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To profit or advantage. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Advantage: profit. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A covering for the foot and leg; profit; advantage.-to boot. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To advantage; profit; avail. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To put boots on; kick. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A leather covering for the foot, or foot and leg. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A carriage receptacle, for carrying parcels, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To profit; avail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Something over and above given in barter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Advantage; resource; help. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A solid covering for the leg, or part, generally of leather; a kind of rack for the leg, formerly used to torture criminals; a box or receptacle in the fore or hind part of a coach: an apron of leather to protect the riders in a chaise, gig, &c.; a leathern case in which to put a filled bottle, to guard against accident in corking. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. Profit; gain; advantage; that which is given to make the exchange equal. To boot, in addition to; over and above. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To put boots on. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To profit; to advantage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To profit; to do good; to enrich. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. Profit; gain; advantage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. A covering for the foot and ankle, and sometimes part of the leg; a box for luggage in the fore part of a coach. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. To put on boots; to make ready for riding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed by it; as, what boots it? mso.anu.edu.au
  49. 1. Computing: Refer to booting 2. Law: Compensation for an unfair exchange. 3. Taxation: When a non-taxable exchange is made into a taxable one, to it's fair price value. thelawdictionary.org
  50. To profit; to advantage; to avail; generally followed by it; as, what boots it? dictgcide_fs
  51. b[=oo]t, n. a covering for the foot and lower part of the leg generally made of leather: an infamous instrument of judicial torture, in which the legs were forced into a strong case and wedges driven in until bone, muscle, and marrow were crushed together--also BOOT'IKIN: a box or receptacle in a coach.--v.t. to put on boots.--n. BOOT'-CLOS'ER, one who closes the upper leathers of boots.--pa.p. BOOT'ED, having boots on, equipped for riding.--ns. BOOT'-HOOK, an instrument for pulling on long boots; BOOT'HOSE (Shak.), hose or stockings used in place of boots; BOOT'-JACK, an instrument for taking off boots; BOOT'LACE, a lace for fastening boots; BOOT'-LAST, BOOT'-TREE, the last or wooden mould on which boots or shoes are made or stretched to keep their shape.--adj. BOOT'LESS, without boots: referring also, as in Tennyson's metaphorical use, 'wedded to a bootless calf,' to the ancient custom at a marriage by proxy of the quasi bridegroom putting one unbooted leg into the bride's bed.--n. BOOTS, the servant at an inn who cleans the boots, runs messages, &c.--in combination, as Lazyboots, Slyboots.--BOOT AND SADDLE (a corr. of Fr. bouteselle, place saddle), the signal to cavalry to mount.--LIKE OLD BOOTS (slang), vigorously, heartily.--SIX FEET IN HIS BOOTS, quite six feet high.--TO DIE IN HIS BOOTS, to be cut off in the midst of health, as by the rope; TO HAVE ONE'S HEART IN ONE'S BOOTS, to be in a state of extreme terror. [O. Fr. bote (mod. botte)--Low L. botta, bota, of dubious origin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. b[=oo]t, v.t. to profit or advantage.--n. advantage: profit: any reparation or compensation paid, like the man-bote of old English law: (Shak.) booty.--adj. BOOT'LESS, without boot or profit: useless.--adv. BOOT'LESSLY.--n. BOOT'LESSNESS.--TO BOOT, in addition; TO MAKE BOOT OF (Shak.), to make profit of. [A.S. bót, compensation, amends, whence betan, to amend, to make BETTER.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Outer foot-covering, usu. all or partly of leather, coming above ankle; (Hist.) instrument of torture, luggage-receptacle in coach under guard\'s& coachman\'s seat; b. is on the other leg, truth or responsibility just the other way round; over shoes over bb., as well risk much as little; heart in one\'s bb., in terror; b. & saddle[French], cavalry signal to mount; bootjack, for pulling bb. off; bootlace, string or leather strip for lacing bb.; bootmaker; b.-trees, moulds for keeping bb. in shape; (slang) get, give, the b., be dismissed, dismiss, from employment. Hence booted a. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Good, advantage, (now only in to boot, as well, to the good, additionally). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. (archaic; usu. impers. & abs.). Do good (to), avail, as, what boots (it) to, (it) little boots, (it) boots (me) not. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. n. That which is given to make an exchange equal; profit; gain. Cabinet Dictionary
  57. n. [French] A covering for the foot and leg;—a rack for the leg, used to torture criminals;—an apron or cover for a gig or other carriage;—a box covered with leather in the fore part, or a receptacle in the hind part, of a coach. Cabinet Dictionary
  58. Profit, gain, advantage; To boot, with advantage, over and above; booty or plunder. Complete Dictionary
  59. A covering for the leg, used by horsemen. Complete Dictionary

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