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Definitions of borrow

  1. take up and practice as one's own Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. get temporarily; "May I borrow your lawn mower?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. To copy or imitate; to adopt; as, to borrow the style, manner, or opinions of another. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To feign or counterfeit. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To receive; to take; to derive. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Something deposited as security; a pledge; a surety; a hostage. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The act of borrowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To receive from another as a loan, with the implied or expressed intention of returning the identical article or its equivalent in kind; - the opposite of lend. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To take (one or more) from the next higher denomination in order to add it to the next lower; - a term of subtraction when the figure of the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding one of the minuend. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To obtain the use of, for a time, with the understanding that it is to be returned; to take; to copy; to adopt; as, almost all republics borrow their constitutions from the United States; in arithmetical subtraction, to take a number from the next higher denomination in order to add it to the next lower. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To receive something with the intention of returning it. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To obtain on loan or trust: to adopt from a foreign source. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. BORROWER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To obtain as a loan. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To obtain on promise of return; copy; adopt; pretend; feign. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To obtain by solicitation a loan; to appropriate and employ; to copy; to assume. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To solicit from another on loan; to receive on credit for a time; to imitate; to copy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. To receive from another as a loan, with the implied or expressed intention of returning the identical article or its equivalent in kind; -- the opposite of lend. mso.anu.edu.au
  19. To take one or more from the next higher denomination in order to add it to the next lower; -- a term of subtraction when the figure of the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding one of the minuend. mso.anu.edu.au
  20. The Israelites "borrowed" from the Egyptians ( Exodus 12:35 , RSV, "asked") in accordance with a divine command ( 3:22 ; 11:2 ). But the word (sha'al) so rendered here means simply and always to "request" or "demand." The Hebrew had another word which is properly translated "borrow" in Deuteronomy 28:12 ; Psalms 37:21 . It was well known that the parting was final. The Egyptians were so anxious to get the Israelites away out of their land that "they let them have what they asked" ( Exodus 12:36 , RSV), or literally "made them to ask," urged them to take whatever they desired and depart. (See LOAN .) biblestudytools.com
  21. To solicit and receive from another any article of property or thing of value with the intention and promise to repay or return it or its equivalent. Strictly speaking, borrowing implies a gratuitous loan ; if any price or consideration is to be paid for the use of the property, it is "hiring." But money may be "borrowed" on an agreement to pay interest for its use. Neel v. State, 33 Tex. Cr. R. 408, 26 S. W. 726; Kent v. Mining Co., 78 N. Y. 177; Legal Tender Cases, 110 U. S. 421, 4 Sup. Ct. 122, 28 L. Ed. 204. This word is often used in the sense of returning the thing borrowed in specie, as to bor row a book or any other thing to be returned again. But it is evident that where money is borrowed, the identical money loaned is not to be returned, because, if this were so, the borrower would derive no benefit from the loan. In the broad sense of the term, it means a contract for the use of monev. State v. School Dist., 13 Neb. 88, 12 N. W. 812; Railroad Co. v. Stiehter, 11 Wkly. Notes Cas. (Pa.) 325. thelawdictionary.org
  22. To receive from another as a loan, with the implied or expressed intention of returning the identical article or its equivalent in kind; the opposite of lend. dictgcide_fs
  23. To take (one or more) from the next higher denomination in order to add it to the next lower; a term of subtraction when the figure of the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding one of the minuend. dictgcide_fs
  24. bor'[=o], v.t. to obtain on loan or trust: to adopt from a foreign source: to derive one's authority from another (with from, of).--p.adj. BORR'OWED, taken on loan, counterfeit, assumed.--n. BORR'OWER.--BORROWING DAYS, the last three days of March (O.S.), supposed in Scotch folklore to have been borrowed by March from April, and to be especially stormy. [A.S. borgian--borg, borh, a pledge, security.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  25. Get temporary use of (money &c. to be returned); adopt, use without being the true or original owner or inventor, derive from another, import from an alien source; (Golf) play ball up-hill to roll back. Hence borrower, borrowing (2), nn. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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