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Definitions of bosom

  1. To inclose or carry in the bosom; to keep with care; to take to heart; to cherish. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To conceal; to hide from view; to embosom. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To place or protect close to the heart; to keep tenderly; to conceal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To inclose in the bosom. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. hide in one's bosom; "She bosomed his letters" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. To enclose in the bosom; to keep with care; to conceal; to cherish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To conceal; to cherish; to preserve with care. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. cloth that covers the chest or breasts Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a person's breast or chest Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. The breast of a human being; the part, between the arms, to which anything is pressed when embraced by them. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The breast, considered as the seat of the passions, affections, and operations of the mind; consciousness; secret thoughts. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Embrace; loving or affectionate inclosure; fold. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Any thing or place resembling the breast; a supporting surface; an inner recess; the interior; as, the bosom of the earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The part of the dress worn upon the breast; an article, or a portion of an article, of dress to be worn upon the breast; as, the bosom of a shirt; a linen bosom. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A depression round the eye of a millstone. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The breast of a human being, or the part of the dress which covers it: (flg.) the seat of the passions and feelings: the heart: embrace, inclosure, as within the arms: any close or secret receptacle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. The breast; the interior. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. The breast, or the part of a garment covering the breast; the affections. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. The breast of a human being; the folds of the dress that cover the breast; the breast as the seat of the tender affections and passions; the breast, as containing the secrets of the heart; any enclosed place; the interior; the embrace. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. The breast of a human being and the parts adjacent; the clothes about the breast; the seat of the passions; embrace; retreat; asylum. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. very close in friendship or affection; "a bosom buddy"; "an intimate friendship" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the chest considered as the place where secret thoughts are kept; "his bosom was bursting with the secret" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. Of or pertaining to the bosom. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Intimate; confidential; familiar; trusted; cherished; beloved; as, a bosom friend. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Intimate; beloved; as, a bosom friend. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. (in composition) Confidential: intimate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Intimate; dear; confidential. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for bosom?

Usage examples for bosom

  1. He saw the swell of her bosom below the pure white shoulders. – Colorado Jim by George Goodchild
  2. Nor would she leave him, she esteem'd him so, Till she had seen him well with her own eye; So full of pity did her bosom grow, Since first she saw him faint and like to die. – Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 by Leigh Hunt
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