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Definitions of bottle

  1. store in bottles, as of liquids or gas Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. glass or plastic vessel; cylindrical with a narrow neck; no handle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the quantity contained in a bottle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. put into bottles; of liquids such a milk or water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. put into bottles; "bottle the mineral water" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. store (liquids or gases) in bottles Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. A hollow vessel, usually of glass or earthenware (but formerly of leather), with a narrow neck or mouth, for holding liquids. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The contents of a bottle; as much as a bottle contains; as, to drink a bottle of wine. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Fig.: Intoxicating liquor; as, to drown one's reason in the bottle. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To put into bottles; to inclose in, or as in, a bottle or bottles; to keep or restrain as in a bottle; as, to bottle wine or porter; to bottle up one's wrath. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A bundle, esp. of hay. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A hollow vessel, usually with a narrow neck, and no handles, made of glass or earthenware, for holding liquids; the contents of such a vessel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To put into such vessels; to shut in or to hold back; as, to bottle up one's feelings. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. A bundle of hay. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. A hollow vessel for holding liquids: the contents of such a vessel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To inclose in bottles. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A narrow-mouthed vessel for holding liquids. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. To put into bottles. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To put into a bottle or bottles; shut in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. A narrow - mouthed vessel for liquids. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. What a bottle will hold bottle ful. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A bundle, as of hay. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A vessel with a narrow mouth, for holding liquors; the contents of a bottle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. The Arabs keep their water, milk and other liquids in leathern bottles. These are made of goatskins. When the animal is killed they cut off its feet and its head, and draw it in this manner out of the skin without opening its belly. The great leathern bottles are made of the skin of a he-goat, and the small ones, that serve instead of a bottle of water on the road, are made of a kids skin. The effect of external heat upon a skin bottle is indicated in ( Psalms 119:83 ) "a bottle in the smoke," and of expansion produced by fermentation in ( Matthew 9:17 ) "new wine in old bottles." Vessels of metal, earthen or glassware for liquids were in use among the Greeks, Egyptians, Etruscans and Assyrians, and also no doubt among the Jews, especially in later times. Thus ( Jeremiah 19:1 ) "a potters earthen bottle." (Bottles were made by the ancient Egyptians of alabaster, gold, ivory and stone. They were of most exquisite workmanship and elegant forms. Tear-bottles were small urns of glass or pottery, made to contain the tears of mourners at funerals, and placed in the sepulchres at Rome and in Palestine. In some ancient tombs they are found in great numbers. ( Psalms 56:8 ) refers to this custom.--ED.) biblestudytools.com
  25. a vessel made of skins for holding wine ( Joshua 9:4 . 13 ; 1 Samuel 16:20 ; Matthew 9:17 ; Mark 2:22 ; Luke 5:37 Luke 5:38 ), or milk (Judg. 4:19 ), or water ( Genesis 21:14 Genesis 21:15 Genesis 21:19 ), or strong drink ( Habakkuk 2:15 ). Earthenware vessels were also similarly used ( Jeremiah 19:1-10 ; 1 Kings 14:3 ; Isaiah 30:14 ). In Job 32:19 (Compare Matthew 9:17 ; Luke 5:37 Luke 5:38 ; Mark 2:22 ) the reference is to a wine-skin ready to burst through the fermentation of the wine. "Bottles of wine" in the Authorized Version of Hosea 7:5 is properly rendered in the Revised Version by "the heat of wine," i.e., the fever of wine, its intoxicating strength. The clouds are figuratively called the "bottles of heaven" ( Job 38:37 ). A bottle blackened or shrivelled by smoke is referred to in Psalms 119:83 as an image to which the psalmist likens himself. biblestudytools.com
  26. Refer to jar. A narrow opening container that is enclosed with a cap to hold contents. thelawdictionary.org
  27. bot'l, n. a bundle of hay.--TO LOOK FOR A NEEDLE IN A BOTTLE OF HAY, to engage in a hopeless search. [O. Fr. botel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. bot'l, n. a hollow vessel for holding liquids: the contents of such a vessel: the habit of drinking.--v.t. to enclose in bottles.--n. BOTT'LE-CHART, one which purports to show the track of sealed bottles thrown from ships into the sea.--p.adj. BOTT'LED, enclosed in bottles: shaped or protuberant like a bottle: kept in restraint.--ns. BOTT'LE-GLASS, a coarse green glass used in the making of bottles; BOTT'LE-GOURD, or False Calabash, a climbing, musky-scented Indian annual, whose fruit is shaped like a bottle, an urn, or a club.--adjs. BOTT'LE-GREEN, dark green in colour, like bottle-glass.--BOTT'LE-HEAD, BOTT'LE-NOSED, having a rounded prominent head, with a short snout, as a certain genus of whale.--ns. BOTT'LE-HOLD'ER, one who attends upon a boxer at a prize-fight, a backer or supporter generally; BOTT'LE-IMP, an imp supposed to be confined in a bottle; BOTT'LE-WASH'ER, one whose business it is to wash out the bottles, a factotum generally.--A THREE-BOTTLE MAN, one who could drink three bottles without losing his decorum.--TO BOTTLE OFF, to draw from the cask and put into bottles; TO BOTTLE UP (one's wrath, &c.), to keep enclosed as in a bottle; TO BRING UP ON THE BOTTLE, to rear an infant artificially rather than by the breast; TO PASS THE BOTTLE, to make the drink go round; TO PASS THE BOTTLE OF SMOKE, to acquiesce in some falsehood, to make pretence. [O. Fr. bouteille, dim. of botte, a vessel for liquids--Low L. butis, a vessel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. Narrow-necked vessel, usu. of glass, for storing liquid; the amount of liquid in it; the b., drinking, over a b., while drinking; bring up on the b., of child not fed from the breast; b.-brush, cylindrical brush for cleaning bb., kinds of plant as Horsetail; b.-glass, coarse dark-green glass; b.-green, dark green; b.-holder, pugilist\'s attendant at prizefight, second, supporter, understrapper; b.-nose, swollen nose, B.-nosed whale; b.-washer, factotum, underling. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. Store in bb.; b. up, conceal, restrain for a time, (resentment &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. Bundle of hay or straw (look for needle in b. of hay, of hopeless search). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. Blue, White, Yellow, B., B. of all sorts, kinds of plant. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. A vessel, usually of glass and having a more or less narrow neck, for holding liquids, Appleton's medical dictionary.
  34. n. [French] A hollow vessel with a narrow mouth for holding liquors;—the contents of a bottle;—a bundle of hay. Cabinet Dictionary
  35. A small vessel of glass, or other matter; a quantity of wine usually put into a bottle, a quart; a quantity fo hay or grass bundled up. Complete Dictionary

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