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Definitions of bound

  1. bound by contract Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. covered or wrapped with a bandage; "the bandaged wound on the back of his head"; "an injury bound in fresh gauze" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. form the boundary of; be contiguous to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a light springing movement upwards or forwards Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a line determining the limits of an area Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (chemistry and physics) held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. confined by bonds; "bound and gagged hostages" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. secured with a cover or binding; often used as a combining form; "bound volumes"; "leather-bound volumes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. being under moral or legal obligation; "felt bound by his promise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. headed or intending to head in a certain direction; often used as a combining form as in `college-bound students'; "children bound for school"; "a flight destined for New York" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. bound by an oath; "a bound official" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. confined in the bowels; "he is bound in the belly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. (usually followed by `to') governed by fate; "bound to happen"; "an old house destined to be demolished"; "he is destined to be famous" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. of Bind The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To rebound, as an elastic ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A leap; an elastic spring; a jump. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Rebound; as, the bound of a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Spring from one foot to the other. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. imp. & p. p. of Bind. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Under legal or moral restraint or obligation. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Resolved; as, I am bound to do it. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Constipated; costive. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A limit; a boundary. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; - said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. imp. & p. p. of Bind. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; - followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; - with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To jump or spring suddenly or move in jumps, one after the other; to leap. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To cause to spring back with elastic motion; to serve as a limit to; to inclose; geographically, to lie alongside of; as, Austria bounds Italy on the north; to name the countries or waters surrounding; as, to bound Italy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. A leap, spring, or jump; a light elastic step; a limit; extent. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. Tied; restrained; confined; intending to go; on the way; as, bound for France; inclosed in a cover, as a book; compelled; destined. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Pa.t. and pa.p. of BIND. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. To set bounds to: to limit, restrain, or surround. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. To spring or leap. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. A spring or leap. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. Ready to go. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. A limit; boundary; a leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. Of to bind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To limit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. To leap lightly; spring; rebound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. A light elastic spring; a rebound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. To set bounds to; form the boundary of; adjoin; name the boundaries of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. That which circumscribes; a boundary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. The district included within a boundary or limits. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. Imp. & pp. of BIND, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Made fast; tied; confined; compelled. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. Having a cover or binding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. Having one's course directed; destined; with for or to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. Destined; going, or intending to go. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. Of the verb to bind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  64. Boundary; limit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. To set limits to; to restrain; to confine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  67. To leap; to move forward by leaps. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  68. Of bind, which see; confined or restrained-as wind-bound, ice-bound; obliged by moral ties. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  69. Destined; going, or ready to go to. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  70. To limit; to restrain or confine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  71. To spring or leap; to move forward by leaps or jumps. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  72. A leap; a spring; a rebound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine. mso.anu.edu.au
  74. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail. mso.anu.edu.au
  75. Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; -- with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. mso.anu.edu.au
  76. As an adjective, denotes the condition of being constrained by the obligations of a bond or a covenant. In the law of shipping, "bound to" or "bound for" denotes that the vessel spoken of is intended or designed to make a voyage to the place named. As a noun, the term denotes a limit or boundary, or a line inclosing or marking off a tract of land. In the familiar phrase "metes and bounds," the former term properly denotes the measured distances, and the latter the natural or artificial marks which indicate their beginning and ending. A distinction is sometimes taken between "bound" and "boundary," to the effect that, while the former signifies the limit itself, (and may be an imaginary line,) the latter designates a visible mark which indicates the limit. But no such distinction is commonly observed. thelawdictionary.org
  77. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine. dictgcide_fs
  78. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail. dictgcide_fs
  79. Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. dictgcide_fs
  80. bownd, pa.t. and pa.p. of BIND, confined, bandaged: intimately connected with--'bound up in:' of books, having a cover of, as 'bound in morocco,' &c. (with in): under obligation or necessity to, as 'bound to win.'--n. BOUND'-BAIL'IFF, a sheriff's officer, so called from his bond given to the sheriff for the discharge of his duty. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  81. bownd, n. a limit or boundary: the limit of anything, as patience--'to break bounds,' to go beyond what is reasonable or allowable: (pl.) a border-land, land generally within certain understood limits, the district.--v.t. to set bounds to: to limit, restrain, or surround.--n. BOUND'ARY, a visible limit: border: termination.--p.adj. BOUND'ED, restricted, cramped.--n. BOUND'ER, a boisterous or overbearing person.--adj. BOUND'LESS, having no limit: vast.--n. BOUND'LESSNESS. [O. Fr. bonne--Low L. bodina, of doubtful origin; cf. Bret. bonn, a boundary.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  82. bownd, v.i. to spring or leap.--n. a spring or leap.--p.adj. BOUND'ING, moving forward with a bound: leaping.--BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS, by startlingly rapid stages. [Fr. bondir, to spring, in O. Fr. to resound--L. bombit[=a]re. See BOOM, the sound.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  83. bownd, adj. ready to go--as in 'outward bound,' &c. [Ice. búinn, pa.p of búa, to prepare.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  84. Costive. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  85. Limit of territory or estate; (usu. p.) limitation, restriction, (out of bb., beyond limits set by school rules; go beyond the bb. of reason, put bb. to). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  86. Set bounds to, limit, (esp. in pass. with by); be the boundary of. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  87. (Of ball &c.) recoil from wall or ground, bounce; (of living thing, wave, &c.) spring, leap, advance lightly. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  88. Springy movement upward or forward; (advance by leaps& bb., with startling speed); (of ball &c.) recoil (on the first b., between first two touchings of ground). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  89. Ready to start, having started, for (or with preceding adv. as homeward b.). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  90. BIND. In vbl senses; esp. b. up with, having the same interests as, closely connected with; b. to win &c., certain. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  91. n. [Armorican] External or limiting line of any object or space; confine; extent. Cabinet Dictionary
  92. n. A leap; a spring; a jump. Cabinet Dictionary
  93. A limit, a boundary; a limit by which any excursion is restrained; a leap, a jump, a spring; a rebound. Complete Dictionary
  94. Part. Passive of bind. Complete Dictionary
  95. Destined, intending to come to any place. Complete Dictionary

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