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Definitions of bound

  1. To leap; to move forward by leaps. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; - said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause to spring back with elastic motion; to serve as a limit to; to inclose; geographically, to lie alongside of; as, Austria bounds Italy on the north; to name the countries or waters surrounding; as, to bound Italy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To set bounds to: to limit, restrain, or surround. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To limit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To set bounds to; form the boundary of; adjoin; name the boundaries of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To rebound, as an elastic ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To jump or spring suddenly or move in jumps, one after the other; to leap. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To spring or leap. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To leap lightly; spring; rebound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; - with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To set limits to; to restrain; to confine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To limit; to restrain or confine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. To spring or leap; to move forward by leaps or jumps. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Resolved; as, I am bound to do it. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Constipated; costive. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; - followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Of the verb to bind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. The district included within a boundary or limits. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A leap; an elastic spring; a jump. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Rebound; as, the bound of a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Spring from one foot to the other. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A limit; a boundary. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. A leap, spring, or jump; a light elastic step; a limit; extent. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. A spring or leap. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. A limit; boundary; a leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. A light elastic spring; a rebound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. That which circumscribes; a boundary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Boundary; limit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A leap; a spring; a rebound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. (chemistry and physics) held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  42. confined by bonds; "bound and gagged hostages" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  43. secured with a cover or binding; often used as a combining form; "bound volumes"; "leather-bound volumes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  44. headed or intending to head in a certain direction; often used as a combining form as in `college-bound students'; "children bound for school"; "a flight destined for New York" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  45. bound by an oath; "a bound official" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  46. confined in the bowels; "he is bound in the belly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  47. held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. imp. & p. p. of Bind. Newage Dictionary DB
  49. imp. & p. p. of Bind. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Tied; restrained; confined; intending to go; on the way; as, bound for France; inclosed in a cover, as a book; compelled; destined. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. Pa.t. and pa.p. of BIND. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. Ready to go. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. Of to bind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. Imp. & pp. of BIND, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. Made fast; tied; confined; compelled. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. Having one's course directed; destined; with for or to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. Destined; going, or intending to go. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. Destined; going, or ready to go to. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. of Bind The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  60. Of bind, which see; confined or restrained-as wind-bound, ice-bound; obliged by moral ties. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for bound?

Usage examples for bound

  1. Ned Wilson here is bound to be in the know. – The Day of Judgment by Joseph Hocking
  2. No need to say that I was bound when you did it. – A Sea Queen's Sailing by Charles Whistler
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