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Definitions of boundary

  1. the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a line determining the limits of an area Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the greatest possible degree of something; "what he did was beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior"; "to the limit of his ability" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. That which indicates or fixes a limit or extent, or marks a bound, as of a territory; a bounding or separating line; a real or imaginary limit. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. That which marks the extent or limit of anything, especially of territory. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. A visible bound or limit: border: termination. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. A limit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. A limiting line or mark; limit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. A mark indicating a limit; limit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. The bounds, or what marks the bounds; a limit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. By boundary is understood, in general, every separation, natural or artificial, which marks the confines or line of division of two contiguous estates. Trees or hedges may be planted, ditches may be dug, walls or inclosures may be erected, to serve as boundaries. But we most usually understand by boundaries stones or pieces of wood Inserted in the earth on the confines of the two estates. Civ. Code La. art. 826. Boundaries are either natural or artificial. Of the former kind are water-courses, growing trees, beds of rock, and the like. Artificial boundaries are landmarks or signs erected by the hand of man, as a pole, stake, pile of stones, etc. thelawdictionary.org
  12. Estates. By this term is understood in general, every separation, natural or artificial, which marks the confines or line of division of two contiguous estates. 3 Toull. n. 171. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  13. Boundary also signifies stones or other materials inserted in the earth on the confines of two estates. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  14. Boundaries are either natural or artificial. A river or other stream is a natural boundary, and in that case the centre of the stream is the line. 20 John. R. 91; 12 John. R. 252; 1 Rand. R. 417; 1 Halst. R. 1; 2 N. H. Rep. 369; 6 Cowen, R. 579; 4 Pick. 268; 3 Randolph's R. 33 4 Mason's R. 349-397. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  15. An artificial boundary is one made by man. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  16. The description of land, in a deed, by specific boundaries, is conclusive as to the quantity; and if the quantity be expressed as a part of the description, it will be inoperative, and it is immaterial whether the quantity contained within the specific boundaries, be greater or less than that expressed; 5 Mass. 357; 1 Caines' R. 493; 2 John. R. 27; 15 John. 471; 17 John. R. 146; Id. 29; 6 Cranch, 237; 4 Hen. & Munf. 125; 2 Bay, R. 515; and the same rule is applicable, although neither the courses and distances, nor the estimated contents, correspond with such specific boundaries; 6 Mass. 131; 11 Mass. 193; 2 Mass. 380; 5 Mass. 497; but these rules do not apply in cases where adherence to them would be plainly absurd. 17 Mass. 207. Vide 17 S. & R. 104; 2 Mer. R. 507; 1 Swanst. 9; 4 Ves. 180; 1 Stark. Ev. 169; 1 Phil. Ev. Index, h. t.; Chit. Pr. Index, h. t.; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 276; 2 Hill. Ab. c. 24, §209, and Index, h. t. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  17. When a boundary, fixed and by mutual consent, has been permitted to stand for twenty-one years, it cannot afterwards be disturbed. In accordance with this rule, it has been decided, that where town lots have been occupied up to a line fence between them, for more than twenty-one years, each party gained an incontrovertible right to the line thus established, and this whether either party knew of the adverse claim or not; and whether either party has more or less ground than was originally in the lot he owns. 9 Watts, R. 565. See Hov. Fr. c. 8, p. 239 to 243; 3 Sum. R 170 Poth. Contr. de Societe, prem. app. n. 231. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  18. Boundaries are frequently marked by partition fences, ditches, hedges, trees, &c. When such a fence is built by one of the owners of the land, on his own premises, it belongs to him exclusively; when built by both at joint expense, each is the owner of that part on his own land. 5 Taunt. 20. When the boundary is a hedge and a single ditch, it is presumed to belong to him on whose side the hedge is, because he who dug the ditch is presumed to have thrown the earth upon his own land, which was alone lawful to do, and that the hedge was planted, as is usual, on the top of the bank thus raised. 3 Taunt. 138. But if there is a ditch on each side of the hedge, or no ditch at all, the hedge is presumed to be the common property of both proprietors. Arch. N. P. 328; 2 Greenl. Ev. §617. A tree growing in the boundary line is the joint property of both owners of the land. 12 N. H. Rep. 454. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  19. Disputes arising from a confusion of boundaries may be generally settled by an action at law. But courts of equity will entertain a bill for the settlement of boundaries, when the rights of one of the parties may be established upon equitable grounds. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 3923. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  20. Limit-line; thing that limits. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. n. A border or limit;—that which indicates or fixes a limit; a visible mark; a march line. Cabinet Dictionary
  22. Limit, bound. Complete Dictionary

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