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Definitions of box

  1. put into a box; "box the gift, please" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a blow with the hand (usually on the ear); "I gave him a good box on the ear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid; "he rummaged through a box of spare parts" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. separate partitioned area in a public place for a few people; "the sentry stayed in his box to avoid the cold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. private area in a theater or grandstand where a small group can watch the performance; "the royal box was empty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the driver's seat on a coach; "an armed guard sat in the box with the driver" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. any one of several designated areas on a ball field where the batter or catcher or coaches are positioned; "the umpire warned the batter to stay in the batter's box" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. evergreen shrubs or small trees Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the quantity contained in a box; "he gave her a box of chocolates" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a rectangular drawing; "the flowchart contained many boxes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. engage in a boxing match; in sport Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible; "his lying got him into a tight corner" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. engage in a boxing match Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. hit with the fist; "I'll box your ears!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. A tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world. The common box (Buxus sempervirens) has two varieties, one of which, the dwarf box (B. suffruticosa), is much used for borders in gardens. The wood of the tree varieties, being very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A receptacle or case of any firm material and of various shapes. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The quantity that a box contain. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A space with a few seats partitioned off in a theater, or other place of public amusement. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A chest or any receptacle for the deposit of money; as, a poor box; a contribution box. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A small country house. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A boxlike shed for shelter; as, a sentry box. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. An axle box, journal box, journal bearing, or bushing. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A chamber or section of tube in which a valve works; the bucket of a lifting pump. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The driver's seat on a carriage or coach. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A present in a box; a present; esp. a Christmas box or gift. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The square in which the pitcher stands. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A Mediterranean food fish; the bogue. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To inclose in a box. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To furnish with boxes, as a wheel. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To inclose with boarding, lathing, etc., so as to bring to a required form. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A blow on the head or ear with the hand. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To fight with the fist; to combat with, or as with, the hand or fist; to spar. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To boxhaul. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. An evergreen shrub; a case or container with a bottom and sides, which has, or may have, a lid; the quantity such a case contains; the driver's seat on a carriage; a compartment in a theater or other public place; a place of shelter for a man on duty; as a sentry box; a blow on the head with the fist or hand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To shut up in a box; to confine; to stow; to pack; to strike with the fist or hand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. To fight with the fists. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. A tree remarkable for the hardness and smoothness of its wood: a case or receptable for holding anything: the contents of a box: a small house or lodge: a private seat in a theatre: the driver's seat on a carriage. -TO BE IN A BOX, to be in difficulty, or in a compromising position. (Amer.) The phrase TO BE IN THE WRONG BOX has, It seems, a respectable antiquity. “if you will hear how St. Augustine expoundeth that place, you shall perceive that you are in a wrong box."-Ridley (1554). “I perceive that you and I are in a wrong box."-J. Udall (1588). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To put into or .furnish with boxex. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. To strike with the hand or fist. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. An evergreen tree, or its wood; a wooden case; seat in a theatre; the driver's seat in a carriage; a blow with the hand. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To put in a box; to strike with the hand. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To put into or furnish with a box; often with up. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. To cuff or buffet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. To spar, as with boxing-gloves. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A case, as of wood or metal; a coachman's raised seat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. The quantity that a box will hold. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A slap or cuff. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A small tree or shrub of the spurge family; also, its wood, called boxwood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A case of any size and material for containing anything; the contents of the case; a money-chest; the case that contains the compass; an enclosed space, such as a seat in a theatre; a cylindrical hollow iron used in wheels, in which the axletree runs; a hollow tube in a pump, closed with a valve; the driver's seat on a coach; a small lodge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. A blow with the hand or fist. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. A shrub with its wood. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To enclose in a box; to furnish with a box; to make a hole or cut in a tree, to procure the sap. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To give a box to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To make to turn on her keel. To box the compass, to go over the points of the compass in either order. Wrong box, mistaken. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To strike with the hand or fist, especially to strike on the ear, or on the side of the head. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. A case or hollow vessel of any size and shape, and made of any material; a seat separated from others; a shrub having a fine close-grained wood. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. To enclose. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. A blow with the fists or clenched hands. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. for holding oil or perfumery ( Mark 14:3 ). It was of the form of a flask or bottle. The Hebrew word (pak) used for it is more appropriately rendered "vial" in 1 Samuel 10:1 , and should also be so rendered in 2 Kings 9:1 , where alone else it occurs. biblestudytools.com
  60. A container with a flat base and sides, typically square or rectangular and having a lid. thelawdictionary.org
  61. 1. A computer; especially in the construction "foobox" where foo is some functional qualifier, like "graphics",or the name of an operating system (thus, "Unix box","MS-DOS box", etc.) "We preprocess the data on Unix boxesbefore handing it up to the mainframe." The plural"boxen" is sometimes seen.2. Without qualification in an IBM SNA site, "box" refersspecifically to an IBM front-end processor. foldoc_fs
  62. A tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world. The common box (Buxus sempervirens) has two varieties, one of which, the dwarf box (Buxus suffruticosa), is much used for borders in gardens. The wood of the tree varieties, being very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc. dictgcide_fs
  63. boks, n. a tree remarkable for the hardness and smoothness of its wood--also BOX-TREE (Shak.): a case or receptacle for holding anything: the contents of a box: a small house or lodge, as a shooting-box, &c.: in a theatre, a small enclosure with several seats--the boxes = their occupants, the ladies: an old square pew or similar enclosure, as a sentry-box, signal-box, &c.: the driver's seat on a carriage: the case in which the ship's compass is kept.--v.t. to put into or furnish with boxes: (slang) to overturn a watchman in his box.--ns. BOX'-BED, a kind of bed once common in Scotch cottages, having its ends, sides, and roof of wood, and capable of being closed in front by two sliding panels; BOX'-DAY, one of the Court of Session vacation days when papers ordered to be deposited in court must be lodged.--adj. BOX'EN, made of or like boxwood.--ns. BOX'ING-DAY, in England, the day after Christmas, when boxes or presents are given; BOX'-[=I]'RON, a hollow smoothing-iron which is heated by a heater put into it; BOX'-KEEP'ER, an attendant who opens the doors of boxes at theatres or other places of public amusement; BOX'-LOBB'Y, the lobby leading to the boxes in a theatre; BOX'WOOD, wood of the box-tree.--IN THE WRONG BOX, in a false position, in a scrape.--TO BE IN A BOX, to be in a fix; TO BOX HARRY, to take a beefsteak, mutton-chop, or bacon and eggs with tea or ale, instead of the regulation dinner of the commercial traveller; TO BOX THE COMPASS, to name the 32 points in their order and backwards, hence to make a complete roundabout in any opinion. [A.S. box--L. buxus--Gr. pyxos, the tree, pyxis, a box.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  64. boks, n. a blow on the head or ear with the hand.--v.t. to strike with the hand or fist.--v.i. to fight with the fists.--ns. BOX'ER; BOX'ING, the act of fighting with the fists: a combat with the fists; BOX'ING-GLOVE, a padded glove worn in boxing. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. Kinds of small evergreen shrub, esp. one with small dark leathery leaves, much used in garden borders; (also box-wood) its wood, used by turners& engravers; (with qualification) similar plant (Bastard B. &c.). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. Receptacle (usu. lidded, rectangular or cylindrical, & for solids) of wood, cardboard, metal, &c.; driver\'s seat (from the box under it); =boxful as quantity; money-box (put in the b.); separate compartment at theatre, in tavern, &c., in stable or railway truck for horse (loose b., in which it can move about); =JURY-b., WITNESS-b.; hut for sentry or signalman; fishing, shooting, &c., -b., small country house for such temporary uses; protective case in various machines: in the wrong b., awkward position. B.-bed, with wooden roof& sides opening with sliding panels, also bed made to fold up& look like b.; b.-cloth, close-woven cloth like bluff; b.-coat, heavy overcoat (for driving); b.-office, in theatre for booking seats; b.-pleat, double fold in cloth; b.-drain, of quadrangular section; b.-iron, for ironing, hollow for reception of heater. Hence boxful (2) n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Provide with, put into, a b.; b. up, confine uncomfortably, squeeze together; lodge (document) in Law Court; divide off from other compartments; (old slang) b. the watch, over turn watchman in his b.; b. the compass, (Naut.) rehearse the points in correct order, (fig.) make complete revolution& end where one began (in politics, argument, &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Slap with hand on the ear (s). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. Slap person\'s ears; fight (someone, or intr.) with fists (usu. in padded gloves& merely for exercise). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. (Theatr.), attendant on bb.; b. spanner, wrench, with socket head. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  71. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A small wooden case or chest; a rectangular frame, square or oblong, made of wood, tin, &c.;—the contents of the chest or case;—an inclosed space with seats in a place of amusement;—a hut or temporary house for hunting or shooting parties;—a cylindrical, hollow iron, used in wheels, in which the axle-tree runs;—a hollow tube in a pump, closed with a valve; the bucket of a lifting pump;—the driver's seat on a carriage;—a present. Cabinet Dictionary
  72. n. A shrub flourishing in different parts of the globe. The dwarf box is much used for borders in gardens. Cabinet Dictionary
  73. n. [Greek] A blow on the head or ear with the hand. Cabinet Dictionary
  74. A tree; the wood of the tree. Complete Dictionary
  75. A case made of wood, or other matter, to hold any thing; the case of the mariners compass; the chest into which money given is put; seat in the playhouse. Complete Dictionary
  76. A blow on the head given with the hand. Complete Dictionary

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