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Definitions of brace

  1. cause to be alert and energetic; "Coffee and tea stimulate me"; "This herbal infusion doesn't stimulate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the stock of a tool used for turning a drilling bit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. prepare (oneself) for something unpleasant or difficult Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a structural member used to stiffen a framework Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an appliance that corrects dental irregularities Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a support that steadies or strengthens something else; "he wore a brace on his knee" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. elastic straps that hold trousers up (usually used in the plural) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a rope on a square-rigged ship that is used to swing a yard about and secure it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a set of two similar things considered as a unit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. two items of the same kind Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. support by bracing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. either of two punctuation marks (or) used to enclose textual material Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. support or hold steady and make steadfast, with or as if with a brace; "brace your elbows while working on the potter's wheel" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The state of being braced or tight; tension. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Harness; warlike preparation. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Armor for the arm; vantbrace. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The mouth of a shaft. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; - with up. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  33. That which holds anything tightly; a prop; a bandage; a pair; as, a brace of pistols; a curve connecting two or more lines of print; a curved instrument for holding and turning boring tools; a timber to strengthen the framework of a building. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To bind or tie closely; strengthen; to stimulate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Anything that draws together and holds tightly: a bandage: a pair or couple: in printing, a mark connecting two or more words or lines (}):-pl. straps for supporting the trousers: ropes for turning the yards of a ship. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To tighten or strengthen. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Anything which holds; a pair; a connecting sign in printing, Braces, straps that hold the trousers; ropes to turn a ship's yards. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To tighten; strengthen; bind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To strengthen; prop; bind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A support to hold something firmly in place. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A crank-like handle, as for a bit. See illus. at BIT. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A clasp; a curved line for uniting words, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A pair; couple; two. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. The cords on the sides of a drum for tightening the heads and snares. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. That which holds anything tight: a cincture or bandage; a thick strap which supports the body of a coach; a strap to support the trousers; a pair or a couple; tension: tightness; a crooked line connecting two or more words or lines, thus: a piece of timber, framed in with bevel joints to keep the building from swerving either way; a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To tighten; to bind or tie close; to make tense; to strain up; to furnish with braces; to strengthen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. That which holds anything tight or supports anything; a couple or pair; a crooked mark in printing; trowsers supporter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. To bind; to support; to strengthen. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; -- with up. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. left brace or right brace. foldoc_fs
  51. To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; with up. dictgcide_fs
  52. br[=a]s, n. anything that draws together and holds tightly: a bandage: a pair or couple: an instrument of wood or iron used by carpenters and metal-workers for turning boring tools: in printing, a mark connecting two or more words or lines (}): (pl.) straps for supporting the trousers: ropes for squaring or traversing horizontally the yards of a ship.--v.t. to tighten or strengthen, to give firmness to.--adj. BRAC'ING, giving strength or tone. [O. Fr. brace (Fr. bras), the arm, power--L. brachium, Gr. brachi[=o]n, the arm, as holding together.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. br[=a]s, v.t. (Spens.) to embrace, encompass. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. Thing that clasps, tightens, unites, secures; (pl.) suspenders for trousers; thong for tuning drum; strap suspending carriage-body from springs; connecting mark in printing ( ); pair, couple, (dogs, game, contemptuously of persons); strengthening piece of iron or timber in building; b. & bit, revolving tool for boring, screw-driving, &c.; (Naut.) rope attached to yard for trimming sail (splice the main b., drink). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. Fasten tightly, stretch, string up, give firmness to, (b. oneself up, b. one\'s energies, &c.; bracing air); support; couple together; (Naut.) move (sail) by bb. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. An apparatus for supporting some part of the body or for strengthening some other part of an apparatus. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  57. (Nant.), yards, bring them to either side with the Braces, i.e. ropes, one at each end of a yard, either fastened to it or rove through blocks. To B. sharp, to bring the yards as nearly as may be in a line with the keel, and still hold a wind. To B. a-box, to B. them square. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  58. [Fr.L.] A slanting piece in a trussed partition or roof, designed to give stiffness to the joints; a braceis commonly in a state of compression. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  59. n. [Latin] A prop or support, especially a piece of timber extending across a corner from one piece of timber to another;—that which holds any thing tightly or firmly;—a vertical curve line connecting two or more words or lines;—a pair; a couple;—a thick strap which supports a carriage on wheels;—a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which it is turned about;—pl. straps that sustain pantaloons, &c.; suspenders;—a bit-stock;—state of being braced or tight. Cabinet Dictionary
  60. Cincture, bandage; that which holds any thing tight; Braces of a coach, thick straps of leather on which it hangs; Braces in printing, a crooked line inclosing a passage as in a triplet; tension, tightness. Complete Dictionary
  61. A pair, a couple. Complete Dictionary

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