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Definitions of break

  1. surpass in excellence; "She bettered her own record"; "break a record" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. act in disregard of laws and rules; "offend all laws of humanity"; "violate the basic laws or human civilization"; "break a law" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. come to an end; "The heat wave finally broke yesterday" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an escape from jail; "the breakout was carefully planned" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. any frame in which a bowler fails to make a strike or spare; "the break in the eighth frame cost him the match" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a sudden dash; "he made a break for the open door" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of breaking something; "the breakage was unavoidable" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. an act of delaying or interrupting the continuity; "it was presented without commercial breaks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (tennis) a score consisting of winning a game when your opponent was serving; "he was up two breaks in the second set" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the opening shot that scatters the balls in billiards or pool Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a pause from doing something (as work); "we took a 10-minute break"; "he took time out to recuperate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the occurrence of breaking; "the break in the dam threatened the valley" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. interrupt a continued activity; "She had broken with the traditional patterns" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. stop operating or functioning; "The engine finally went"; "The car died on the road"; "The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town"; "The coffee maker broke"; "The engine failed on the way to town"; "her eyesight went after the accident" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. break a piece from a whole; "break a branch from a tree" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. do a break dance; "Kids were break-dancing at the street corner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. enter someone's property in an unauthorized manner, usually with the intent to steal or commit a violent act; "Someone broke in while I was on vacation"; "They broke into my car and stole my radio!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. discontinue an association or relation; go different ways; "The business partners broke over a tax question"; "The couple separated after 25 years of marriage"; "My friend and I split up" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. go to pieces; "The lawn mower finally broke"; "The gears wore out"; "The old chair finally fell apart completely" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. ruin completely; "He busted my radio!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. break down, literally or metaphorically; "The wall collapsed"; "The business collapsed"; "The dam broke"; "The roof collapsed"; "The wall gave in"; "The roof finally gave under the weight of the ice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. become separated into pieces or fragments; "The figurine broke"; "The freshly baked loaf fell apart" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. lessen in force or effect; "soften a shock"; "break a fall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. force out or release suddenly and often violently something pent up; "break into tears"; "erupt in anger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. breaking of hard tissue such as bone; "it was a nasty fracture"; "the break seems to have been caused by a fall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. fracture a bone of; "I broke my foot while playing hockey" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. be released or become known; of news; "News of her death broke in the morning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. an unexpected piece of good luck; "he finally got his big break" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. cease an action temporarily; "We pause for station identification"; "let's break for lunch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. some abrupt occurrence that interrupts; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. weaken or destroy in spirit or body; "His resistance was broken"; "a man broken by the terrible experience of near-death" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. diminish or discontinue abruptly; "The patient's fever broke last night" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. fall sharply; "stock prices broke" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. make submissive, obedient, or useful; "The horse was tough to break"; "I broke in the new intern" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. be broken in; "If the new teacher won't break, we'll add some stress" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. of the male voice in puberty; "his voice is breaking--he should no longer sing in the choir" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. render inoperable or ineffective; "You broke the alarm clock when you took it apart!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. destroy the integrity of; usually by force; cause to separate into pieces or fragments; "He broke the glass plate"; "She broke the match" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. become fractured; break or crack on the surface only; "The glass cracked when it was heated" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. happen; "Report the news as it develops"; "These political movements recrudesce from time to time" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. prevent completion; "stop the project"; "break off the negociations" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. terminate; "She interrupted her pregnancy"; "break a lucky streak"; "break the cycle of poverty" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. change suddenly from one tone quality or register to another; "Her voice broke to a whisper when she started to talk about her children" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  47. come into being; "light broke over the horizon"; "Voices broke in the air" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. find the solution or key to; "break the code" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49. find a flaw in; "break an alibi"; "break down a proof" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  50. undergo breaking; "The simple vowels broke in many Germanic languages" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  51. interrupt the flow of current in; "break a circuit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  52. pierce or penetrate; "The blade broke her skin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53. become punctured or penetrated; "The skin broke" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  54. separate from a clinch, in boxing; "The referee broke the boxers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. make the opening shot that scatters the balls Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. destroy the completeness of a set of related items; "The book dealer would not break the set" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. exchange for smaller units of money; "I had to break a $100 bill just to buy the candy" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. curl over and fall apart in surf or foam, of waves; "The surf broke" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. emerge from the surface of a body of water; "The whales broke" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. scatter or part; "The clouds broke after the heavy downpour" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  61. make a rupture in the ranks of the enemy or one's own by quitting or fleeing; "The ranks broke" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  62. move away or escape suddenly; "The horses broke from the stable"; "Three inmates broke jail"; "Nobody can break out--this prison is high security" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  63. change directions suddenly Wordnet Dictionary DB
  64. assign to a lower position; reduce in rank; "She was demoted because she always speaks up"; "He was broken down to Sargeant" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  65. invalidate by judicial action; "The will was broken" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  66. cause the failure or ruin of; "His peccadilloes finally broke his marriage"; "This play will either make or break the playwright" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  67. happen or take place; "Things have been breaking pretty well for us in the past few months" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  68. come forth or begin from a state of latency; "The first winter storm broke over New York" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  69. fail to agree with; be in violation of; as of rules or patterns; "This sentence violates the rules of syntax" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  70. give up; "break cigarette smoking" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  71. cause to give up a habit; "She finally broke herself of smoking cigarettes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  72. vary or interrupt a uniformity or continuity; "The flat plain was broken by tall mesas" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  73. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock. Webster Dictionary DB
  74. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, to break a package of goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  75. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate. Webster Dictionary DB
  76. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise. Webster Dictionary DB
  77. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey. Webster Dictionary DB
  78. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, to break a set. Webster Dictionary DB
  79. To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce; as, the cavalry were not able to break the British squares. Webster Dictionary DB
  80. To shatter to pieces; to reduce to fragments. Webster Dictionary DB
  81. To exchange for other money or currency of smaller denomination; as, to break a five dollar bill. Webster Dictionary DB
  82. To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, to break flax. Webster Dictionary DB
  83. To weaken or impair, as health, spirit, or mind. Webster Dictionary DB
  84. To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a fall or blow. Webster Dictionary DB
  85. To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, to break a horse to the harness or saddle. Webster Dictionary DB
  86. To destroy the financial credit of; to make bankrupt; to ruin. Webster Dictionary DB
  87. To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss. Webster Dictionary DB
  88. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. Webster Dictionary DB
  89. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag. Webster Dictionary DB
  90. To burst forth; to make its way; to come to view; to appear; to dawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  91. To burst forth violently, as a storm. Webster Dictionary DB
  92. To open up; to be scattered; to be dissipated; as, the clouds are breaking. Webster Dictionary DB
  93. To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength. Webster Dictionary DB
  94. To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief; as, my heart is breaking. Webster Dictionary DB
  95. To fall in business; to become bankrupt. Webster Dictionary DB
  96. To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait; as, to break into a run or gallop. Webster Dictionary DB
  97. To fail in musical quality; as, a singer's voice breaks when it is strained beyond its compass and a tone or note is not completed, but degenerates into an unmusical sound instead. Also, to change in tone, as a boy's voice at puberty. Webster Dictionary DB
  98. To fall out; to terminate friendship. Webster Dictionary DB
  99. An opening made by fracture or disruption. Webster Dictionary DB
  100. An interruption of continuity; change of direction; as, a break in a wall; a break in the deck of a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  101. A projection or recess from the face of a building. Webster Dictionary DB
  102. An opening or displacement in the circuit, interrupting the electrical current. Webster Dictionary DB
  103. An interruption; a pause; as, a break in friendship; a break in the conversation. Webster Dictionary DB
  104. An interruption in continuity in writing or printing, as where there is an omission, an unfilled line, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  105. The first appearing, as of light in the morning; the dawn; as, the break of day; the break of dawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  106. A large four-wheeled carriage, having a straight body and calash top, with the driver's seat in front and the footman's behind. Webster Dictionary DB
  107. A device for checking motion, or for measuring friction. See Brake, n. 9 & 10. Newage Dictionary DB
  108. See Commutator. Webster Dictionary DB
  109. To lay bare; to lay open to attack, danger, or anything objectionable; to render accessible to anything which may affect, especially detrimentally; to make liable; as, to expose one's self to the heat of the sun, or to cold, insult, danger, or ridicule; to expose an army to destruction or defeat. Webster Dictionary DB
  110. To impart, as news or information; to broach; - with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend. Webster Dictionary DB
  111. A device for checking motion, or for measuring friction. See Brake, n. 9 & 10. Webster Dictionary DB
  112. To separate into parts or pieces by a blow or strain; to force open; as, to break open a door; to interrupt or disconnect; as, to break silence, to break ranks; to fracture, as a bone; weaken or destroy; as, to break a fall; to scatter; with up; ad, to break up a party; to set aside or fail to obey, as a promise or a law; to degrade, as an officer to the ranks; to tell cautiously; as, to break bad news; tame, as a horse; to dig up; as, to break ground. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  113. To separate into parts or pieces suddenly or violently; to begin or change suddenly; to fail, as in health, strength, credit, etc.; to burst; to burst forth violently, as a storm; to be scattered, as clouds; to cease to be friendly (with). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  114. An opening; an open place; an interruption; a first appearance or marked change; as, the break of day; a pause; a sudden fall in prices; as, a break in the stock market; an abrupt change in the musical quality of a tone; as, a break in a boy's voice. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  115. Broke. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  116. Broken. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  117. Breaking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  118. 1. A solution of continuity, fracture. 2. The interruption of an electric current. 3. To divide in two or into a number of parts. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  119. To part by force: to shatter: to crush: to tame: to violate: to check by intercepting, as a fall: to interrupt, as silence: to make bankrupt: to divulge. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  120. To part in two: to burst forth: to open or appear, as the morning: to become bankrupt: to fall out, as with a friend:-pa.t. broke; pa.p. broken. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  121. The state of being broken: an opening: a pause or interruption: the dawn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  122. To come apart; to fall out; to become bankrupt; to appear, as the day. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  123. To part by force; to infringe; to separate; to tame; to make bankrupt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  124. To make bankrupt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  125. To separate into parts or fragments, as by a blow; rupture; shatter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  126. To fail to keep; violate; transgress. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  127. To degrade, as a military or naval officer; cashier. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  128. To disclose cautiously, as ill tidings. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  129. To reduce to discipline; tame. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  130. To become fractured, as by a blow; part; burst. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  131. To change suddenly; dawn, as the day; begin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  132. To fail; become bankrupt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  133. Breakable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  134. A breach; interruption. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  135. A starting or opening out; as, the break of day. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  136. The state of being broken; an opening or breach; an interruption; a line in writing or printing, noting suspension of the sense, or a stop; the first appearance of light in the morning, or the dawn; a drag or appliance to check motion; a strong-built carriage, used for breaking in horses, and training them to draught. To break the back, to ruin; to break the keel; to get through with the most part. To break bulk, to begin to unload. To break cover, to come forth from a lurking-place, as hunted game. To break a deer, to cut it up at table. To break ground, to plough; to dig; to open trenches; to commence an undertaking. To break the heart, to afflict grievously; to destroy with grief. To break a lance, to have trial of skill To break the ice, to overcome the first difficulties. To break in, to tame; to train to something. To break down, to destroy; to overcome; to give way. To break off, to part by breaking; to abandon; to desist suddenly. To break up, to dissolve, or put an end to; to open, or lay open; to separate; to disband. To break upon the wheel, to stretch and break the bones by torture upon the wheel. To break wind, to give vent to wind from the body. To break in, to enter by force: to intrude. To break loose, to escape from captivity; to shake off restraint. To break out, to issue forth; to discover itself by its effects; to arise or spring up; to appear in eruptions; to throw off restraint, and become dissolute. To break up, to dissolve and separate. To break with, to part in enmity; to cease to be friends. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  137. To part by force; to rend apart; to rupture; to shatter; to disperse; to weaken or impair; to subdue; to tame or make tractable; to make bankrupt; to dismiss or cashier; to violate, as a law; to interrupt; to intercept; to lessen the force of; to make a first disclosure of, as a scheme or tidings. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  138. To part in pieces; to burst; to show the first light or dawn; to burst forth; to utter or exclaim; to become bankrupt; to decline in health and strength; to force a way; to interrupt friendship; to fall out; to change. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  139. An inclosure for cattle; a bit for horses; a wooden frame for confining the feet of vicious horses in shoeing. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  140. An opening; a rent; a tear; a pause or interruption; a stop. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  141. To separate or divide by force; to rend; to crush; to weaken or impair; to tame or train; to interrupt; to lessen the force of; to dissolve or abandon; to explain or open a matter to any one; to decline in health. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  142. To impart, as news or information; to broach; -- with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend. mso.anu.edu.au
  143. 1. To cause to be broken. "Your latest patchto the editor broke the paragraph commands."2. (Of a program) To stop temporarily, so that it maydebugged. The place where it stops is a "breakpoint".3. To send an EIA-232 break (two character widths of linehigh) over a serial line.4. [Unix] To strike whatever key currently causes the ttydriver to send SIGINT to the current process. Normally,break, delete or control-C does this.5. "break break" may be said to interrupt a conversation (thisis an example of verb doubling). This usage comes from radiocommunications, which in turn probably came from landlinetelegraph/teleprinter usage, as badly abused in the Citizen'sBand craze.6. pipeline break.7. break statement. foldoc_fs
  144. To impart, as news or information; to broach; with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend. dictgcide_fs
  145. br[=a]k, v.t. to part by force: to shatter: to crush: to tame, or wear out: to violate, or outrage, as a law, a bargain, &c.: to check by intercepting, as a fall: to interrupt, as silence, or the monotony of anything, or in 'to break one off a habit:' to make bankrupt: to degrade from rank, as an officer.--v.i. to part in two: to burst forth: to open or appear, as the morning: to become bankrupt: to crack or give way, as the voice: to dissolve, as frost: to collapse in foam, as a wave: to fall out, as with a friend:--pa.t. br[=o]ke; pa.p. br[=o]k'en.--n. the state of being broken: an opening: a pause or interruption: (billiards) a consecutive series of successful strokes, also the number of points attained by such: the dawn.--ns. BREAK'AGE, the action of breaking, or its consequences: an interruption; BREAK'-DOWN, a dance, vigorous rather than graceful, in which much noise is made by the feet of the one performer; BREAK'ER, a wave broken on rocks or the shore.--adj. BREAK'-NECK, likely to cause a broken neck.--ns. BREAK'-PROM'ISE, BREAK'-VOW, one who makes a practice of breaking his promise or vow; BREAK'WATER, a barrier to break the force of the waves.--BREAK A JEST, to utter a jest unexpectedly; BREAK A LANCE WITH, to enter into a contest with a rival; BREAK AWAY, to go away abruptly, as from prison, &c.: to be scattered, as clouds after a storm; BREAK BULK, to open the hold and take out a portion of the cargo; BREAK COVER, to burst forth from concealment, as a fox; BREAK DOWN, to crush down or level: to collapse, to fail completely; BREAK FORTH, to burst out, issue; BREAK GROUND, to commence digging or excavation: to begin; BREAK IN, to train to labour, as a horse; BREAK IN, IN UPON, or INTO, to enter violently or unexpectedly, to interpose abruptly in a conversation, &c.; BREAK LOOSE, to extricate one's self forcibly: to break through all restraint; BREAK NEWS, to make anything known, esp. of bad news, with caution and delicacy; BREAK OFF, to separate by breaking, put an end to; BREAK OUT, to appear suddenly: to break through all restraint; BREAK SHEER (said of a ship riding at anchor), to be forced by wind or tide out of a position clear of the anchor; BREAK THE HEART, to destroy with grief; BREAK THE ICE (fig.), to get through first difficulties: BREAK UP, to break open; BREAK UPON THE WHEEL, to punish by stretching a criminal on a wheel and breaking his bones; BREAK WIND, to void wind from the stomach; BREAK WITH, to fail out, as friends may do. [A.S. brecan; Ger. brechen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  146. BRAKE, br[=a]k, n. a large wagonette: a carriage frame, all wheels and no body, used in breaking in horses. [BREAK, v.t.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  147. To separate forcibly into two or more parts; of an electric current, to cut off or interrupt. na
  148. (broke& in Bible brake; broken sometimes broke see BROKE). 1. (Of a whole) make or become discontinuous otherwise than by cutting, divide into two or more parts, (b. BULK; b. a set, sell parts separately; b. up, dismiss, depart, b. small; b. a lance with, argue against; b. bread with, be entertained by; b. Priscian\'s head, use bad grammar; b. person on wheel, of medieval execution; b. butterfly on wheel, waste power; b. ground, plough, begin siege, or fig. any, operations; b. the ice, get over initial shyness or reserve; b. the ranks, disorder by leaving them; troops b., disperse in confusion; clouds b., show gap); crack, graze, (b. a head); shatter; dislocate (neck; b. the neck or back of, kill, dispose of); make by separating obstacles (a way &c.); penetrate by breaking (b. open); interrupt; change, (gloom, spell, journey, silence, one\'s fast; voice breaks, with emotion or at manhood; b. off, bring to an end, cease); disrupt (broken bonds &c.). 2. (Of a part) disconnect or depart from something otherwise than by cutting, (b. bough from tree, person of habit; b. with, quarrel or part with; b. an officer, dismiss; b. piece off; ball breaks, changes from its course, back from off, in from leg, side). 3. Make a way, come, produce, with effort, suddenness, violence, &c. (b. into house, out of prison, through obstacles; b. in, intrude, interpose; disease, war, b. out: b. out, exclaim; b. news, a jest, reveal it; day breaks; abscess breaks); escape, emerge from, (prison, bounds, covert; b. free or loose; b. away from). 4. Make or become weak, disable, discourage, ruin, destroy, cease, exhaust, (b. the heart, heart breaks; frost, weather, breaks; b. bank, exhaust its resources; merchant breaks, is bankrupt; b. blow, fall, weaken its effect; b. down, demolish, collapse, fail); tame, discipline, overpower, (with in, to, or abs.; b. a horse, b. a horse to the rein; b. in child; b. one\'s will, spirit; b. resistance, a rebellion); make of no effect, transgress, violate, neglect, (law, Sabbath, contract, promise, one\'s word). Hence breakable a., breakage (3) n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  149. Breaking; b. of day, dawn; (Cricket) deviation of ball on pitching (b.-back, f. off side); (Billiards) points scored continuously; gap, broken place, interruption of continuity; (Mus.) point of separation between different registers of voice; irregularity. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  150. Carriage-frame with no body for breaking in young horses; large wagonette. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  151. (also, esp. of person) become feeble, show signs of approaching death. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  152. Interruption of an electric current. See Make. American pocket medical dictionary.
  153. A large four-wheeled carriage, with a straight body, seats for four, with calash top, and seats for driver and footmen. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  154. See Brake. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  155. n. [Anglo-Saxon] An opening made by force;—an interruption; a pause;—a dash indicating a suspension or stoppage of the moaning;—the first appearing of light in the morning;—a carriage, used for training horses. Cabinet Dictionary
  156. State of being broken, opening; a pause, an interruption; a line drawn, noting that the sense is suspended. Complete Dictionary

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