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Definitions of broad

  1. broad in scope or content; "across-the-board pay increases"; "an all-embracing definition"; "blanket sanctions against human-rights violators"; "an invention with broad applications"; "a panoptic study of Soviet nationality"- T.G.Winner; "granted him wide powers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. having great (or a certain) extent from one side to the other; "wide roads"; "a wide necktie"; "wide margins"; "three feet wide"; "a river two miles broad"; "broad shoulders"; "a broad river" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. slang term for a woman; "a broad is a woman who can throw a mean punch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. showing or characterized by broad-mindedness; "a broad political stance"; "generous and broad sympathies"; "a liberal newspaper"; "tolerant of his opponent's opinions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. lacking subtlety; obvious; "gave us a broad hint that it was time to leave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. not detailed or specific; "a broad rule"; "the broad outlines of the plan"; "felt an unspecific dread" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (of speech) heavily and noticeably regional; "a broad southern accent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. very large in expanse or scope; "a broad lawn"; "the wide plains"; "a spacious view"; "spacious skies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. being at a peak or culminating point; "broad day"; "full summer"; "high noon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Comprehensive; liberal; enlarged. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Plain; evident; as, a broad hint. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Free; unrestrained; unconfined. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Characterized by breadth. See Breadth. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Cross; coarse; indelicate; as, a broad compliment; a broad joke; broad humor. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Strongly marked; as, a broad Scotch accent. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The broad part of anything; as, the broad of an oar. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The spread of a river into a sheet of water; a flooded fen. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A lathe tool for turning down the insides and bottoms of cylinders. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; - opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; - applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending largely on the substantive. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Wide; ample; vast; liberal; as, broad opinions; widely distributed; open; clear; unrestrained; evident; bold; as, a broad hint; indelicate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Broadly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Broadness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Broader. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Broadest. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Wide: large, free or open: coarse, indelicate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Extended in width; wide; vast. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Comprehensive; catholic; liberal; tolerant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Strong, rude, or coarse, as speech. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Wide; large; extensive; vast; not narrow; liberal; full; open; unconfined; bold; gross; indelicate. It is as broad as it is long, the same, whichever way. Broad church, that section of the Protestant Church which inclines to liberal opinions, and is opposed to those who would narrow either spirit or form. Broad-gauge, distance more than 4 ft. 8 1/2 in. between the rails of a railway. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. Wide; not narrow; extensive; open; coarse; not delicate; bold. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; -- opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; -- applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending largely on the substantive. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad. dictgcide_fs
  37. Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending largely on the substantive. dictgcide_fs
  38. A woman, especially one who is sexually promiscuous; usually considered offensive. dictgcide_fs
  39. brawd, adj. wide: large, free or open: outspoken: coarse, indelicate: of pronunciation, e.g. a broad accent.--advs. BROAD, BROAD'LY.--ns. BROAD'-AR'ROW, a mark, thus ([Broad arrow]), stamped on materials belonging to Government; BROAD'-BRIM, a hat with a broad brim, such as those worn by Quakers: (coll.) a Quaker.--adj. BROAD'CAST, scattered or sown abroad by the hand: dispersed widely.--adv. by throwing at large from the hand, only in phrases, as, 'to scatter broadcast,' &c.--v.t. to scatter freely.--n. BROAD'CLOTH, a fine kind of woollen fulled cloth, used for men's garments.--v.t. BROAD'EN, to make broad or broader.--v.i. to grow broad or extend in breadth.--adj. BROAD'-EYED (Shak.), having a wide or extended survey.--ns. BROAD'-GAUGE (see GAUGE); BROAD'NESS.--n.pl. BROADS, lake-like expansions of rivers.--ns. BROAD'SIDE, the side of a ship: all the guns on one side of a ship of war, or their simultaneous discharge: a sheet of paper printed on one side, otherwise named BROAD'SHEET; BROAD'SWORD, a cutting sword with a broad blade: a man armed with such a sword.--BROAD CHURCH, a party within the Church of England which advocates a broad and liberal interpretation of dogmatic definitions and creed subscription--the name was first used in 1833 by W. J. Conybeare. [A.S. brád, Goth. braids.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Any body is so termed whose transverse extent is considerable compared with its length. The Broad Bones, such as the frontal, parietal, occipital, iliac, aid in forming the parietes of splanchnic cavities. Broad Muscles generally occupy the parietes of cavities, and especially those of the chest and abdomen. The epithet has also been applied to other parts-as to the broad ligaments of the womb, &c. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  41. Large across, wide, not narrow; =in breadth (6 ft b.); extensive (b. lands); full, clear, main, explicit, (b. daylight, facts, distinction, hint); coarse (b. story); downright in sound, not mincing, (b. Yorkshire, Scotch); generalized (b. rule); tolerant (B. Church, churchmen favouring comprehension& not pressing doctrines); bold in effect or style; as b. as it is long, indifferent; b. ARROW; broadcloth, fine plainwove double-width dressed black cloth[phr. in Act of Parl. 1482 kept as name for quality rather than width]; b. GAUGE; b.-glass, window-glass; broadsheet, large sheet of paper printed on one side only; broadside, ship\'s side above water between bow& quarter (broadside on, to, with this presented), (discharge of) all guns on one side of ship, also =broadsheet; b.-silk, -weaver, (of) silk in piece not in ribbons; broadsword, b.-bladed cuttingsword. (Noun) the b. part (b. of the back); (E. Anglia) large piece of fresh water formed by widening of river. (ADV.) =broadly (speak b., b. awake); b.-blown, in full bloom; broadcast, a., adv., & v.t., (of seed) scattered over surface (not in drills or rows), (sow) in this manner, (also fig. of pamphlets, spies, &c.). Hence broaden v.t. & i., broadly, broadways, broadwise, advv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Wide, extended in breadth; large; clear, open; gross, coarse; obscene, fulsome; bold, not delicate, not reserved. Complete Dictionary

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