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Definitions of brood

  1. To sit on in order to hatch; to cover with the wings; to continue anxiously pondering. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To cover, as a bird its young; incubate; cherish; nurse; meditate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. The young birds hatched at one time; a hatch; as, a brood of chickens. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The young from the same dam, whether produced at the same time or not; young children of the same mother, especially if nearly of the same age; offspring; progeny; as, a woman with a brood of children. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. That which is bred or produced; breed; species. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Heavy waste in tin and copper ores. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To sit over, cover, and cherish; as, a hen broods her chickens. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To cherish with care. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To think anxiously or moodily upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To sit over, cover, and cherish; as, to brood eggs. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To mature or cherish with care. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To sit on and cover eggs, as a fowl, for the purpose of warming them and hatching the young; or to sit over and cover young, as a hen her chickens, in order to warm and protect them; hence, to sit quietly, as if brooding. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To have the mind dwell continuously or moodily on a subject; to think long and anxiously; to be in a state of gloomy, serious thought; - usually followed by over or on; as, to brood over misfortunes. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To sit on eggs, as a hen; linger sorrowfully; with on or over. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To sit upon or cover in order to breed or hatch: to cover, as with wings: to think anxiously for a long time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To cover in order to hatch; to cover as with wings; to think persistently. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. hang over, as of something threatening, dark, or menacing; "The terrible vision brooded over her all day long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. sit on (eggs); "Birds brood"; "The female covers the eggs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. be in a huff and display one's displeasure; "She is pouting because she didn't get what she wanted" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. To sit over and cover; to cherish; to meditate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. To sit over, as a bird over her eggs; to spread over as with wings; to dwell on a subject in anxious thought; to cherish. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. Offspring; the young birds hatched at one time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Something bred: offspring: the number hatched at once. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. A number hatched at once; offspring. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. All the young birds of a single hatching; offspring; progeny. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. The number of birds hatched at once; offspring; that which is bred. See Breed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. Offspring; progeny; the number of birds hatched at a time. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. Sitting or inclined to sit on eggs. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Kept for breeding from; as, a brood mare; brood stock; having young; as, a brood sow. Webster Dictionary DB

What are the misspellings for brood?

Usage examples for brood

  1. I encouraged the thoughts of all the children to rest and brood upon the fragments that are given us, and, believing that the imagination is one of the most powerful of all the faculties for aiding the growth of truth in the mind, I would ask them questions as to what they thought he might have said or done in ordinary family occurrences, thus giving a reality in their minds to this part of his history, and trying to rouse in them a habit of referring their conduct to the standard of his. – The Seaboard Parish Volume 1 by George MacDonald
  2. With his beloved queen, and their fair little brood of children, the King cast aside his cares, and was all, and more than all, he had been as the ornament of Henry's Court. – The Caged Lion by Charlotte M. Yonge
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