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Definitions of bud

  1. To graft by inserting a bud into the slit bark. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To put forth, as buds; begin to grow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To graft. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To graft, as a plant, by inserting a bud under the bark of another tree:- pr.p. budding; pa.p. budded. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To graft with a bud. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To put forth or produce buds, as a plant; to grow, as a bud does, into a flower or shoot. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To begin to grow, or to issue from a stock in the manner of a bud, as a horn. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To be like a bud in respect to youth and freshness, or growth and promise; as, a budding virgin. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To put forth or produce new shoots; begin to grow. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To put forth buds: to begin to grow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To put forth buds. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. start to grow or develop; "a budding friendship" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To graft by inserting the bud of a plant under the bark of another tree. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To put forth shoots; to sprout; to grow as buds. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. Budding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. a swelling on a plant stem consisting of overlapping immature leaves or petals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. develop buds; "The hibiscus is budding!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A small protuberance on the stem or branches of a plant, containing the rudiments of future leaves, flowers, or stems; an undeveloped branch or flower. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A small protuberance on certain low forms of animals and vegetables which develops into a new organism, either free or attached. See Hydra. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The early stage of a branch, leaf, or flower; a young girl in her first season in society. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. The first shoot of a tree or plant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A germ or first shoot of a tree or plant; an incipient flower. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. An undeveloped stem, branch, or flower. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The act or stage of budding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. The first shoot from a stem or branch; an unexpanded leaf or flower. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. The shoot or sprout on a plant containing the future leaf or flower; a flower not blown or expanded. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. A rudimentary shoot, or flower; any outgrowth which will develop directly into an exact replica of the structure or organism from which it grew out. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  28. Budded. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for bud?

Usage examples for bud

  1. All right, laughed Bud only don't make it so strong that he won't recognize me when he sees me. – A Gentleman from Mississippi by Thomas A. Wise
  2. He looked at Bud rather sharply. – Cow-Country by B. M. Bower
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