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Definitions of C

  1. being ten more than ninety Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. one of the four nucleotides used in building DNA; all four nucleotides have a common phosphate group and a sugar (ribose) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a unit of electrical charge equal to the amount of charge transferred by a current of 1 ampere in 1 second Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. ten 10s Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a base found in DNA and RNA and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with guanine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a degree on the Centigrade scale of temperature Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. street names for cocaine Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. the 3rd letter of the Roman alphabet Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. a general-purpose programing language closely associated with the UNIX operating system Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. The keynote of the normal or natural scale, which has neither flats nor sharps in its signature; also, the third note of the relative minor scale of the same. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written . Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The clef, a modification of the letter C, placed on any line of the staff, shows that line to be middle C. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. As a numeral, stands for Latin centum or 100, Cfor 200, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Abbreviation for cylinder or cylindrical lens, centigrade or Celsius, contraction, closure (of an electrical circuit), and congius (gallon). Chemical symbol for carbon. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  18. Third letter of the alphabet. As a Roman numeral, 100. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. The third letter in the English alphabet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Is the third letter and second consonant of the English alphabet. Before a, o, u, I, and r, it has a hard or close sound, like k; and before e, i, and y, it has a soft or sibilant sound, precisely like s. When combined with the letter h, it has three different sounds: the first is equivalent to tsh, as in chair, church; the second is equivalent to k, as in character, chemistry; and the third, occurring only in a few words, derived from the French; also in several words when preceded by n, flinch, bench, is equivalent to sh, as in chaise, chemise. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. As an abbreviation, stands for Christ, as A.C. for ante Christum; also for companion, as C.B., Companion of the Bath. On medals, C stands for many names of persons, as caesar, Caius.Cassius, Carolus, &c.; and also of offices, as Censor, Consul. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. As a numeral, stands for 100, CC for 200,&c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. In music, when placed after the clef, is the mark of common time; and when a bar is perpendicularly drawn through it, alla-breve time, or a quicker movement, is indicated. C is also the first note of the diatonic scale, answering to the do of the Italians, and the ut of the French. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. For L. centum, a hundred. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g in go; its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek /, /, and came from the Greek alphabet. The Greeks got it from the Ph/nicians. The English name of C is from the Latin name ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s and other sibilant sounds. Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search. mso.anu.edu.au
  26. C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve four fourths or crotchets; for alla breve time it is written /. mso.anu.edu.au
  27. The "C clef," a modification of the letter C, placed on any line of the staff, shows that line to be middle C. mso.anu.edu.au
  28. As a numeral, C stands for Latin centum or 100, CC for 200, etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  29. A programming language designed by Dennis Ritchieat AT&T Bell Labs ca. 1972 for systems programming on thePDP-11 and immediately used to reimplement Unix.It was called "C" because many features derived from anearlier compiler named "B". In fact, C was briefly named"NB". B was itself strongly influenced by BCPL. BeforeBjarne Stroustrup settled the question by designing C++,there was a humorous debate over whether C's successor shouldbe named "D" or "P" (following B and C in "BCPL").C is terse, low-level and permissive. It has a macropreprocessor, cpp.Partly due to its distribution with Unix, C became immenselypopular outside Bell Labs after about 1980 and is now thedominant language in systems and microcomputer applicationsprogramming. It has grown popular due to its simplicity,efficiency, and flexibility. C programs are often easilyadapted to new environments.C is often described, with a mixture of fondness and disdain,as "a language that combines all the elegance and power ofassembly language with all the readability andmaintainability of assembly language".Ritchie's original C, known as K&R C after Kernighan andRitchie's book, has been standardised (and simultaneouslymodified) as ANSI C.See also ACCU, ae, c68, c386, C-Interp, cxref,dbx, dsp56k-gcc, dsp56165-gcc, gc, GCT, GNU C,GNU superoptimiser, Harvest C, malloc, mpl,Pthreads, ups. foldoc_fs
  30. C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s (and other sibilant sounds). Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search. dictgcide_fs
  31. The keynote of the normal or (b) C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written (c) The dictgcide_fs
  32. the third letter of our alphabet, originally having the sound of g, then of k, and finally, in some languages, equivalent to s: (mus.) name of one of the notes of the gamut, also the sound on which the system is founded--the scale C major has neither flats nor sharps, and therefore is called the natural scale. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. This letter in the chemical alphabet signifies nitre. It is also sometimes used in prescriptions for calx. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  34. Symbol of carbon. na
  35. letter (pl. Cs, C\'s, Cees). C springs, see CEE. (Mus.) first note of natural major scale. (In argument) third hypothetical person or thing. (Alg.) third known quantity. Abbreviations (1): C, centum, 100, as CI 101, CV 105, CCL 250, CM 900, DC 600, XC 90. C., centigrade, as 15° C.; Chartered, C. A. (Accountant); Companion, as C.B. (Bath), C.M.G. (St Michael& St George), C.I.E. (Indian Empire); confined, C.B. (to barracks); County, C.C. (Councillor); Ceylon, C.C.S. (Civil Service); contagious, C.D. (diseases); Civil, C.E. (Engineer); Church, as C.E.T.S. (of England Temperance Society), C.M.S. (Missionary Society); Channel, C.I. (Islands); Crown, C.I. (of India); Commander, as C.V.O. (Victorian Order); Chief, C.J. (Justice); Commanding, C.O. (Officer); cash, C.O.D. (on delivery); Charity, C.O.S. (Organization Society). c., chapter, as c. XII, cc. I-V; cent, as $1.75 c.; colt; circiter, as c. 1750; cum, c. div. (dividend); carte, c.d.v. (de visite); care, c/o (of). Abbreviations (2): Cal. (ifornia); Cambs., Cambridgeshire; Can. (ada); Cant. (icles); Cantuar., Abp of Canterbury; cap., chapter; Capt. (ain); Cels. (ius); Cestr., Bp of Chester; cf., confer (L=compare); cg., centigram; ch. (apter); Ches. (hire); Chron. (icles); Cicestr., Bp of Chichester; circ. (iter); cl., centilitre; cm., centimeter; Co. (unty in Ireland); Co. (mpany); Col. (onel); Col. (ossians); Colo. (rado); Conn. (ecticut); cor. (inthians); Corn. (wall); Corp. (oral); cp., compare; Cr, Creditor; crim.con., criminal conversation; Cumb. (erland); cwt, hundredweight. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. Abbreviation for carbon, congius (gallon), compound, centigrade, centimeter, clonus, closure, etc. American pocket medical dictionary.
  37. Abbreviation for centigrade, for cylinder or cylindrical lens, for closure and contraction, and for congius (gallon) Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. This letter is used in ancient MSS. as an abbrev. for Caius, Caesar, Consul, Civitas, etc.; in the Roman law courts it was the sign of condemnation, in contradistinction to A, for Absolvo, I acquit, the former being therefore called Litera tristis, the latter Litera salutaris. As a numeral, it denotes 100. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  39. The third letter in the English alphabet, and the second consonant, has two sounds, one close, like K; the other a sibilant, precisely like S. The digraph ch has three sounds, the first equivalent to tsh, as in church; the second equivalent so sh, as in chaise; the third equivalent to k, as in chorus. C after the cleft is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semi-breve, corresponding to 4/4. C is also the name of a note in the scale; the key note major, and the third minor, of the natural scale. Cabinet Dictionary

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