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Definitions of capture

  1. To seize or take possession of by force, surprise, or stratagem; to overcome and hold; to secure by effort. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To seize by force, surprise, etc.; to make a prisoner or prize of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To take as a prize: to take by force. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To take as a prisoner or prize. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To take captive or possession of; win. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. attract; cause to be enamored; "She captured all the men's hearts" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. succeed in catching or seizing, , esp. after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping; "I caught a rabbit in the trap toady" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. succeed in representing or expressing something intangible; "capture the essence of Spring"; "capture an idea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To take or seize by force; to take as a prize. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To take or lay hold of by force; to seize by stratagem. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. the removal of an opponent's piece from the chess board Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. any process in which an atomic or nuclear system acquires an additional particle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a process whereby a star or planet holds an object in its gravitational field Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. The act of seizing by force, or getting possession of by superior power or by stratagem; as, the capture of an enemy, a vessel, or a criminal. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The securing of an object of strife or desire, as by the power of some attraction. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The thing taken by force, surprise, or stratagem; a prize; prey. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The act of seizing, as a prisoner or a prize; arrest; the thing taken. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. The act of taking the thing taken: an arrest. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Act of taking prisoner or seizing; the thing taken. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. The act of capturing; that which is captured. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The act of taking or seizing; the thing taken; a prize. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. The act of taking or seizing by an enemy, as a ship; the thing taken; a prize; seizure, as of a criminal. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for capture?

Usage examples for capture

  1. Isn't the moment the capture of the divine? – Balloons by Elizabeth Bibesco
  2. The capture is a very important one, and there must be no mistake made. – Colonel Thorndyke's Secret by G. A. Henty
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