Spellcheck.net

Definitions of cat

  1. eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; "After drinking too much, the students vomited"; "He purged continuously"; "The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. any of several large cats typically able to roar and living in the wild Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an informal term for a youth or man; "a nice guy"; "the guy's only doing it for some doll" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. beat with a cat-o'-nine-tails Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. feline mammal usually having thick soft fur and being unable to roar; domestic cats; wildcats Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (trademark) a large vehicle that is driven by caterpillar tracks; frequently used for moving earth in construction and farm work Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a whip with nine knotted cords; "British sailors feared the cat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a spiteful woman gossip; "what a cat she is!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a large vehicle that is driven by caterpillar tracks; frequently used for moving earth in construction and farm work Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. the leaves of the shrub Catha edulis which are chewed like tobacco or used to make tea; has the effect of a euphoric stimulant; "in Yemen kat is used daily by 85% of adults" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. An animal of various species of the genera Felis and Lynx. The domestic cat is Felis domestica. The European wild cat (Felis catus) is much larger than the domestic cat. In the United States the name wild cat is commonly applied to the bay lynx (Lynx rufus) See Wild cat, and Tiger cat. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A strong vessel with a narrow stern, projecting quarters, and deep waist. It is employed in the coal and timber trade. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A strong tackle used to draw an anchor up to the cathead of a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A double tripod (for holding a plate, etc.), having six feet, of which three rest on the ground, in whatever position in is placed. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An old game; (a) The game of tipcat and the implement with which it is played. See Tipcat. (c) A game of ball, called, according to the number of batters, one old cat, two old cat, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A cat o' nine tails. See below. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To bring to the cathead; as, to cat an anchor. See Anchor. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A flesh-eating animal; especially, the familiar household pet. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. A common domestic animal. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. A domestic animal. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. A domestic animal, kept to kill mice and rats. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. One of various fishes. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A purchase for hoisting an anchor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A cat o nine tails. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A domestic animal; a kind of ship; a strong tackle or combination of pulleys, to draw an anchor to the cathead; a double tripod, having six feet, and which falls like a cat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To raise to the cathead and stow there. Cat-beam, the longest beam in a ship. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. A well-known domestic animal. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Common Abstract Tree Language. R. Voeller & Uwe Schmidt, UKiel, Germany 1983. Universal intermediate language, used byNorsk Data in their family of compilers. "A Multi-LanguageCompiler System with Automatically Generated Codegenerators,U. Schmidt et al, SIGPLAN Notices 19(6):202-2121 (June 1984). foldoc_fs
  30. (From "catenate") Unix's command which copies one ormore entire files to the screen or some other output sinkwithout pause.See also dd, BLT.Among Unix fans, cat is considered an excellent example ofuser-interface design, because it delivers the file contentswithout such verbosity as spacing or headers between the files(the pr command can be used to do this), and because it doesnot require the files to consist of lines of text, but workswith any sort of data.Among Unix haters, cat is considered the canonical exampleof *bad* user-interface design, because of its woefullyunobvious name. It is far more often used to blast a fileto standard output than to concatenate files. The name "cat"for the former operation is just as unintuitive as, say,LISP's cdr.Of such oppositions are holy wars made. foldoc_fs
  31. Any animal belonging to the natural family Felidae, and in particular to the various species of the genera Felis, Panthera, and Lynx. The domestic cat is Felis domestica. The European wild cat (Felis catus) is much larger than the domestic cat. In the United States the name wild cat is commonly applied to the bay lynx (Lynx rufus). The larger felines, such as the lion, tiger, leopard, and cougar, are often referred to as cats, and sometimes as big cats. See Wild cat, and Tiger cat. dictgcide_fs
  32. A double tripod (for holding a plate, etc.), having six feet, of which three rest on the ground, in whatever position it is placed. dictgcide_fs
  33. same as cat o' nine tails; as, British sailors feared the cat. dictgcide_fs
  34. A catamaran. dictgcide_fs
  35. kat, n. a common domestic animal kept to devour mice: a spiteful woman: a movable pent-house used for their protection by besiegers: a double tripod with six legs: a piece of wood tapering at each end, struck with the CAT-STICK in the game of tip-cat, this game itself: short for the CAT-O'-NINE'-TAILS, an instrument of punishment consisting of a whip with nine tails or lashes, with three or four knots on each, once used in the army and navy.--v.t. to raise the anchor to the cathead.--ns. CAT'AMOUNT, a common name in the United States for the cougar or puma--also called Panther, Painter, and American lion; CATAMOUN'TAIN, or CAT O' MOUNTAIN, a leopard, panther, or ocelot: a wild mountaineer.--adj. ferocious, savage.--adj. CAT-AND-DOG, used attributively for quarrelsome.--ns. CAT'-BIRD, an American bird of the thrush family, so called on account of the resemblance of its note to the mewing of a cat; CAT'-CALL, a squeaking instrument used in theatres to express dislike of a play: a shrill whistle or cry.--v.i. to sound a cat-call.--v.t. to assail with such.--adj. CAT'-EYED, having eyes like a cat: able to see in the dark.--n. CAT'GUT, a kind of cord made from the intestines of animals, and used as strings for violins, harps, guitars, &c., the cords of clock-makers, &c.: the violin or other stringed instrument: a coarse corded cloth.--adj. CAT'-HAMMED, with thin hams like a cat's.--ns. CAT'HEAD, one of two strong beams of timber projecting from the bow of a ship, on each side of the bowsprit, through which the ropes pass by which the anchor is raised; CAT'-HOLE, one of two holes in the after part of a ship, through which hawsers may pass for steadying the ship or for heaving astern; CAT'HOOD, state of being a cat or having the nature of a cat; CAT'KIN, a crowded spike or tuft of small unisexual flowers with reduced scale-like bracts, as in the willow, hazel, &c.; CAT'-LAP, any thin or poor drink.--adj. CAT'-LIKE, noiseless, stealthy.--ns. CAT'LING, a little cat, a kitten: the downy moss on some trees, like the fur of a cat: (Shak.) a lute-string; CAT'MINT, a perennial plant resembling mint, said to be so called from the fondness cats have for it; CAT'S'-CR[=A]'DLE, a game played by children, two alternately taking from each other's fingers an intertwined cord, so as always to maintain a symmetrical figure; CAT'S'-EYE, a beautiful variety of quartz, so called from the resemblance which the reflection of light from it bears to the light that seems to emanate from the eye of a cat; CAT'S-FOOT, a plant, called also Ground-ivy; CAT'-SIL'VER, a variety of silvery mica; CAT'S'-MEAT, horses' flesh, or the like, sold for cats by street dealers; CAT'S'-PAW (naut.), a light breeze: the dupe or tool of another--from the fable of the monkey who used the paws of the cat to draw the roasting chestnuts out of the fire; CAT'S'-TAIL, a catkin: a genus of aquatic plants of the reed kind, the leaves of which are sometimes used for making mats, seating chairs, &c.: a kind of grass.--adj. CAT'-WIT'TED, small-minded, conceited, and spiteful.--CATTED AND FISHED, said of an anchor raised to the cathead and secured to the ship's side.--BELL THE CAT (see BELL).--CARE KILLED THE CAT, even with his proverbial nine lives.--CHESHIRE CATS are proverbially notable for grinning, and KILKENNY CATS proverbially fight till each destroys the other.--RAIN CATS AND DOGS, to pour down heavily.--SEE WHICH WAY THE CAT JUMPS, to watch how things are going to turn before committing one's self.--TURN THE CAT IN THE PAN, to change sides with dexterity.--For GIB-CAT, TABBY-CAT, TOM-CAT, see under GIB, TABBY, &c. [A.S. cat; found also in Celt., Slav., Ar., Finn, &c.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. kat, n. an old name for a coal and timber vessel on the north-east coast of England.--adj. CAT'-RIGGED, having one great fore-and-aft mainsail spread by a gaff at the head and a boom at the foot, for smooth water only. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. Small domesticated carnivorous quadruped (male, Tom-c.); Wild C., larger native British kind; spiteful woman, scratching child; (Zool.) any member of genus Felis, as lion, tiger, panther, leopard (esp. the Cc., the great Cc.); c.-like animal of other species (civet, musk, -c.); (Hist.) pent-house in sieges; (also cathead) horizontal beam from each side of ship\'s bow for raising& carrying anchor; (also c.-o\'-nine-tails) rope whip with nine knotted lashes formerly used for flogging sailors& soldiers; six-legged tripod always standing on three of its legs; tapered short stick in game tip-c.; turn c. in pan, change sides, be turn-coat; c. may look at king, rebuke to the exclusive; care killed the c. (for all its nine lives; therefore be cheerful); wait for the c. to jump, see which way the c. jumps, cult of the jumping c., &c., of politician refusing to advise until public opinion has declared itself; fight like Kilkenny cc., to mutual destruction; BELL the c.; not room to swing a c., confined space; c.-&-dog life &c., full of quarrels, esp. that of husband& wife; rain cc. & dogs, very hard; catbird, Amer. thrush; catcall, shrill whistle (sound or instrument) expressing disapproval at theatre &c. (also as v.i. & t., use, reprove with, this); c.-eyed, able to see in dark; catfish, of various kinds, esp. large Amer. river-fish; c.-ice, milky-looking, bubbly, not solid, irregular by receding of water; c.-lap, slops, tea, &c.; c.-mint, blue-flowered aromatic plant; c.-nap, -sleep, brief, in chair &c.; c.\'s-cradle, child\'s game with transfers of string between fingers of two players; c.\'s-eye, precious stone of Ceylon& Malabar; c.\'s-foot, ground-ivy; c.\'s-meat, horse-flesh prepared& hawked as food for cc.; c.\'s-paw, person used as tool by another, slight breeze rippling water in places; c.\'s-tail, various plants, as Reed-mace. Hence cathood n., catlike a. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. (colloq.). Vomit. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. the c.-&-mouse Act, nickname for the Act of 1913 directed against the hunger-strike policy of woman-suffrage prisoners& enabling Home Secretary to release& re-arrest them at need. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. (Naut.) A strong vessel of about 600 tons (usually a collier or timber-ship), built on the lines of a Norwegian, but having a deep waist, narrow stern, projecting quarters, and no ornamental figure-head. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  41. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A well-known domestic animal;—a strong tackle to draw an anchor up;—a double tripod;—a game at ball;—a whip. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. A domestick animal that catches mice. Complete Dictionary
  43. A sort of ship. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for cat?

X