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Definitions of cause

  1. a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end; "he supported populist campaigns"; "they worked in the cause of world peace"; "the team was ready for a drive toward the pennant"; "the movement to end slavery"; "contributed to the war effort" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. (law) a comprehensive term for any proceeding in a court of law whereby an individual seeks a legal remedy; "the family brought suit against the landlord" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any entity that causes events to happen Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally; "cause a commotion"; "make a stir"; "cause an accident" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a justification for something existing or happening; "he had no cause to complain"; "they had good reason to rejoice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a comprehensive term for any proceeding in a court of law whereby an individual seeks a legal remedy; "the family brought suit against the landlord" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. That which produces or effects a result; that from which anything proceeds, and without which it would not exist. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. That which is the occasion of an action or state; ground; reason; motive; as, cause for rejoicing. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Sake; interest; advantage. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Any subject of discussion or debate; matter; question; affair in general. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The side of a question, which is espoused, advocated, and upheld by a person or party; a principle which is advocated; that which a person or party seeks to attain. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Abbreviation of Because. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To effect as an agent; to produce; to be the occasion of; to bring about; to bring into existence; to make; - usually followed by an infinitive, sometimes by that with a finite verb. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which produces or contributes to a result; in law, ground for action; motive; reason; a side or party; as, the cause of right; a suit or action in court. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To produce; to bring about. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. Causeless. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. That which produces an effect or condition; that by which a morbid change or disease is brought about. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  21. That by or through which anything is done: inducement: a legal action. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To produce: to make to exist: to bring about. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. That which produces an effect; reason; object sought; legal action. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To bring about; produce. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To produce; effect; compel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. That which produces anything or event. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A reason; purpose; aim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A great enterprise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A lawsuit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. That which produces an effect, or contributes to it; that which always precedes an effect; reason; motive; the object sought; sake; subject in debate; case; a legal action. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. Anything that produces an effect; the person or thing that brings about or does something; a reason; a motive or inducement that urges or impels; a suit at law; a party or side. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To effect or produce; to occasion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To effect as an agent; to produce; to be the occasion of; to bring about; to bring into existence; to make; -- usually followed by an infinitive, sometimes by that with a finite verb. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. Civ. law. This word has two meanings. 1. It signifies the delivery of the thing, or the accomplishment of the act which is the object of a convention. Datio vel factum, quibus ab una parte conventio, impleri caepta est. 6 Toull. n. 13, 166. 2. it is the consideration or motive formakinga contract. An obligation without a cause, or with a false or unlawful cause, has no effect; but an engagement is not the less valid, though the cause be not expressed. The cause is illicit, when it is forbidden by law, when it is contra bones mores, or public order. Dig. 2, 14, 7, 4; Civ. Code of Lo. a. 1887-1894 Code Civil, liv. 3, c. 2, s. 4, art. 1131-1133; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 3, c. 2, s. 4. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  35. Contra torts, crim. That which produces an effect. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  36. In considering a contract, an injury, or a crime, the law for many purposes looks to the immediate, and not to any remote cause. Bac. Max. Reg. 1; Bac. Ab. Damages, E; Sid. 433; 2 Taunt. 314. If the cause be lawful, the party will be justified; if unlawful, he will be condemned. The following is an example in criminal law of an immediate and remote cause. If Peter, of malice prepense, should discharge a pistol at Paul, and miss him, and then cast away the pistol and fly and, being pursued by Paul, he turn round, and kill him with a dagger, the law considers the first as the impulsive cause, and Peter would be guilty of murder. But if Peter, with his dagger drawn, had fallen down, and Paul in his haste had fallen upon it and killed himself, the cause of Paul's death would have been too remote to charge Peter as the murderer. Id. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. In cases of insurance, the general rule is that the immediate and not the remote cause of the loss is to be considered; causa proximo non remota s pedatur. This rule may, in some cases, apply to carriers. Story, Bailm. 515. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  38. For the reach of contracts, the contractor is liable for the immediate effects of such breach, but not for any remote cause, as the failure of a party who was to receive money, and did not receive it, in consequence of which he was compelled to stop payment. 1 Brock. Cir. C. Rep. 103. See Remote; and also Domat, liv. 3, t. 5, s. 2, n. 4; Toull. liv. 3, n. 286; 6 Bing. R. 716; 6 Ves. 496; Pal. Ag. by Lloyd, 10; Story, Ag. 200; 3 Sumn. R. 38. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  39. Pleading.The reason; the motive. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  40. In a replication de injuria, for example, the plaintiff alleges that the defendant of his own wrong, and without the cause by him in his plea alleged, did, &c. The word cause here means without the matter of excuse alleged, and though in the singular number, it puts in issue all the facts in the plea, which constitute but one cause. 8 Co. 67; 11 East, 451; 1 Chit. Pl. 585. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  41. Practice. A Contested question before a court of justice; it is a Suit or action. Causes are civil or criminal. Wood's Civ. Law, 302; Code, 2, 416. 20 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  42. To effect as an agent; to produce; to be the occasion of; to bring about; to bring into existence; to make; usually followed by an infinitive, sometimes by that with a finite verb. dictgcide_fs
  43. kawz, n. that which produces an effect: that by or through which anything happens: motive: inducement: a legal action between contending parties: sake, advantage: that side of a question which is taken up by an individual or party: (Shak.) accusation: (Shak.) matter, affair in general.--v.t. to produce: to make to exist: to bring about: (Spens.) to give excuses.--conj. (dial.) because.--adj. CAUS'AL, relating to a cause or causes.--n. CAUSAL'ITY, the working of a cause: (phren.) the faculty of tracing effects to their causes.--adv. CAUS'ALLY, according to the order of causes.--ns. CAUS[=A]'TION, the act of causing: the bringing about of an effect; the relation of cause and effect; CAUS[=A]'TIONISM, the theory of causation; CAUS[=A]'TIONIST, a believer in the foregoing.--adj. CAUS'ATIVE, expressing causation.--n. a form of verb or noun expressing such.--adv. CAUS'ATIVELY.--adj. CAUSE'LESS, having no cause or occasion.--adv. CAUSE'LESSLY.--ns. CAUSE'LESSNESS; CAUS'ER, one who causes an effect to be produced.--CAUSE CÉLÈBRE, a convenient French term for a specially interesting and important legal trial, criminal or civil.--FINAL CAUSE, the end or object for which a thing is done, esp. the design of the universe; FIRST CAUSE, the original cause or creator of all.--HOUR OF CAUSE (Scot.), hour or time of trial.--SECONDARY CAUSES, such as are derived from a primary or first cause.--HAVE or SHOW CAUSE, to have to give reasons for a certain line of action; MAKE COMMON CAUSE (with), to unite for a common object; SHOW CAUSE (Eng. law), to argue against the confirmation of a provisional order or judgment.--For OCCASIONAL CAUSES, see OCCASIONALISM. [Fr.,--L. causa.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. An act which precedes another, and seems to be a necessary condition for the concurrence of the latter. The causes of disease are generally extremely obscure; although they, sometimes, are evident enough. The predisponent and occasional causes are the only two on which any stress can be laid; but as authors have divided them differently, a short explanation is necessary. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  45. What produces an effect; antecedent (s) invariably and unconditionally followed by a certain phenomenon; person who, agent that, occasions something; ground, reason, motive, for action; adequate motive or justification (esp. show c.); efficient c., producing force, material c., the requisite matter, formal c., the idea or definition, final c., purpose; First C., the Creator. (Law, and from law) matter about which person goes to law; his case (plead a c.); law-suit; side of any dispute espoused by person or party, militant movement, propaganda, (make common c. with); c.-list, of cases a waiting trial. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Effect, bring about, produce; induce, make, (person or thing to do, to be done something to). Hence causer n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. Any act or state of things that produces a certain effect. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  48. n. [Latin] That which produces or effects a result;—that which is the origin of an action;—a suit or action in court; case;—the side of a question or controversy espoused and advocated. Cabinet Dictionary
  49. That which produces or effects any thing, the efficient; the reason, motive to any thing; subject of litigation; party. Complete Dictionary

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