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Definitions of cement

  1. To unite and cohere. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To cover with or join by cement; unite; cohere. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. Unite firmly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To unite with cement: to join firmly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To unite with cement. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To become cemented or firmly united; to cohere. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. make fast as if with cement; "We cemented our friendship" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. bind or join with or as if with cement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. To unite with cement; to unite firmly or closely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To unite by a glutinous substance; to unite firmly and closely; to cohere. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. a specialized bony substance covering the root of a tooth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. something that hardens to act as adhesive material Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. concrete pavement is sometimes referred to as cement; "they stood on the gray cement beside the pool" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. any of various materials used by dentists to fill cavities in teeth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. Any substance used for making bodies adhere to each other, as mortar, glue, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A kind of calcined limestone, or a calcined mixture of clay and lime, for making mortar which will harden under water. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The powder used in cementation. See Cementation, n., 2. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To unite or cause to adhere by means of a cement. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To unite firmly or closely. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To overlay or coat with cement; as, to cement a cellar bottom. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The layer of bone investing the root and neck of a tooth; - called also cementum. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Any substance which makes two bodies stick together; mortar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Anything that makes two bodies stick together: mortar: a bond of union. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. An adhesive substance for uniting stone, glass, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. A substance for joining objects by adhesion; a mortar - like substance for producing a hard, smooth, or water - proof surface. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. An adhesive substance for making bodies, especially stones, cohere; bond of union; that which unites firmly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. The substance that unites two bodies together, or the parts of a broken thing; bond of union; mortar. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. A substance chemically and physically allied to bone, investing the root, neck, and crowns of teeth. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

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Usage examples for cement

  1. The Edison poured or cast cement house may be reckoned as a reality. – Edison, His Life and Inventions by Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin
  2. Then boil some tar with a little grease for a quarter of an hour, and make a cement of the whole together. – The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, by Mary Eaton
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