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Definitions of centre

  1. a building dedicated to a particular activity; "they were raising money to build a new center for research" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a cluster of nerve cells governing a specific bodily process; "in most people the speech center is in the left hemisphere" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a point equidistant from the ends of a line or the extremities of a figure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. move into the center; "That vase in the picture is not centered" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a place where some particular activity is concentrated; "they received messages from several centers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an area that is approximately central within some larger region; "it is in the center of town"; "they ran forward into the heart of the struggle"; "they were in the eye of the storm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a low-lying region in central France Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. focus one's attention on something; "Please focus on your studies and not on your hobbies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the sweet central portion of a piece of candy that is enclosed in chocolate or some other covering Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. direct one's attention on something; "Please focus on your studies and not on your hobbies" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Alt. of seal Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Alt. of punch Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To be placed in a center; to be central. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To be collected to a point; to be concentrated; to rest on, or gather about, as a center. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To place or fix in the center or on a central point. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To collect to a point; to concentrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To form a recess or indentation for the reception of a center. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Center. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. The middle point of anything, esp. of a circle; the middle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To meet in a centre. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To place at or gather to a centre. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To place in or on a center; draw to a center; determine the center of; be or converge in the center. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The middle point of anything, especially of a circle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The middle point of anything; the middle or central object; the head of an organization; a middle party; the troops in the line between the wings. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To place on a centre; to collect to a point. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To be collected to a point; to be placed in the centre. Centre of gravity, the point about which the parts of a body, when left free, exactly balance each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. The middle point or place. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. To place on the middle point; to collect to one point; to settle exclusively on one object; to rest on. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. CENTER, sen't[.e]r, n. the middle point of anything, esp. a circle or sphere: the middle: the point toward which all things move or are drawn: the chief leader of an organisation--head-centre: the men of moderate political opinions in the French Chamber, sitting right in front of the president, with extreme men on the right and on the left--further subdivisions are RIGHT-CENTRE and LEFT-CENTRE: the Ultramontane party in Germany.--v.t. to place on or collect to a centre.--v.i. to be placed in the middle:--pr.p. cen'tring, cen'tering; pa.p. cen'tred, cen'tered.--adj. CEN'TRAL, belonging to the centre, principal, dominant: belonging to a nerve-centre, of affections caused by injury to the brain or spinal cord.--ns. CENTRALIS[=A]'TION, CEN'TRALISM, the tendency to administer by the sovereign or central government matters which would be otherwise under local management.--v.t. CEN'TRALISE, to draw to a centre.--n. CENTRAL'ITY, central position.--advs. CEN'TRALLY, CEN'TRICALLY.--ns. CEN'TRE-BIT, a joiner's tool, turning on a centre, for boring circular holes--one of the chief tools of the burglar; CEN'TRE-BOARD, a shifting keel, fitted to drop below and in line with the keel proper in order to increase or diminish the draught of a boat--much used in United States racing yachts; CEN'TRE-PIECE, an ornament for the middle of a table, ceiling, &c.--adjs. CEN'TRIC, CEN'TRICAL, relating to, placed in, or containing the centre.--ns. CEN'TRICALNESS, CENTRIC'ITY; CEN'TRUM, the body of a vertebra.--CENTRAL FIRE, said of a cartridge in which the fulminate is placed in the centre of the base, as opposed to rim fire; CENTRAL FORCES, forces whose action is to cause a moving body to tend towards a fixed point called the centre of force.--CENTRE OF ATTRACTION, the point to which bodies tend by the force of gravity; CENTRE OF BUOYANCY, or DISPLACEMENT, the point in an immersed body at which the resultant vertical pressure may be supposed to act; CENTRE OF GRAVITY, a certain point, invariably situated with regard to the body, through which the resultant of the attracting forces between the earth and its several molecules always passes; CENTRE OF INERTIA, or MASS, the centre of a set of parallel forces acting on all the particles of a body, each force being proportional to the mass of the particle on which it acts; CENTRE OF OSCILLATION, the point in a body occupied by that particle which is accelerated and retarded to an equal amount, and which therefore moves as if it were a single pendulum unconnected with the rest of the body; CENTRE OF PERCUSSION, the point in which the direction of a blow, given to a body, intersects the plane in which the fixed axis and the centre of inertia lie, making the body begin to rotate about a fixed axis, without causing any pressure on the axis; CENTRE OF PRESSURE, the point at which the direction of a single force, which is equivalent to the fluid pressure on the plane surface, meets the surface. [Fr.,--L. centrum--Gr. kentron, a sharp point.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. The middle point of a figure or body. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  31. [Latin] The middle point of anything; that point about which the parts of a body are more or less symmetrically disposed. C. of gravity, the point through which the line of support or line of suspension passes when a body, suspended or supported at one point only, remains balanced or in equilibrium. na
  32. [Latin] Hence, the core of anything; the organ or region to which impulses from the periphery converge, and from which impulses radiate to the periphery. Germinal c., see Germinal. Ossification-c. the point at which ossification begins in bone. The short bones have one c., the long bones one for the shaft and one or more for each extremity (epiphysis) and process (apophysis), the flat and irregular bones usually several. na
  33. Middle point (strictly, equidistant from ends of line measuring along it, or from extremities of regular surface or body, or from all points in circumference of circle or sphere, & at mean distance from all points in periphery of irregular surface or body); point, pivot, axis, of revolution (in lathe, conical adjustable bearing to hold revolving object); point of concentration or dispersion, nucleus, source; (Fenians &c.) organizer, leader, (esp. head-c.); (hit on) part of target between bull\'s-eye and outer; (Arch.) wooden mould for arch or dome while building; (Mil.) main body of troops between wings; (Polish; orig. f. French) the C., men of moderate opinions (left-c., left, radical grades; right-c., right, reactionary); c. of attraction, (Physics) to which bodies tend by gravity, (fig.) drawing general attention; c. of gravity, that point in body, which being supported, body remains at rest in any position; c. of mass, point (in relation to body) any plane passing through which divides body into two parts of equal weight; DEAD c.; c.-piece, ornament for middle of table; c.-rail, third rail on mountain railways for cogged wheel &c.; c.-second (s), seconds hand mounted on centre arbor of clock or watch; c.-bit, boring-tool with c. point& side cutters; c.-board, (flat-bottomed boat with) board for lowering through keel to prevent lee-way; hence centreless, centric (AL), aa., centrically2 adv., centricity n. (Adj.) at, of, the c.; hence centremost a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. Be concentrated in, on, at, round, about; place in c.; mark with a c.; concentrate in &c.; find c. of. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Same as Center. American pocket medical dictionary.
  36. [L., Gr.]; C. of a curve; C. of gravity; C. of gyration; C. of inertia; C. of a lens; C. of mass; C. of oscillation; C. of percussion; C. of position; C. of pressure; C. of a surface. A term used vaguely to mean the middle point or part of anything. The C. of a curved line or surface is the point (if there be one) which bisects all straight lines that are drawn through it and are terminated at both ends by the line or surface, such as the C. of a circle, ellipse, sphere, spheroid, etc. The C. of gravity is that point of a body through which the force of gravity on the body will act, in whatever position it may be placed; consequently, if that point is supported the body will rest in any position. It must be remembered, however, that this definition presupposes that the forces exerted by gravity on the parts of the body act along parallel lines. The C. of gravity is called also the C. of inertia, and sometimes the C. of mass and the C. of position. The C. of gyration is a point into which, if all the particles of a rotating body were condensed, its moment of inertia, with reference to the axis of rotation, would continue unchanged. The C. of oscillation is that point of an oscillating body at which, if all the particles of the body were condensed, the small oscillations would be performed in the same time as the actual small oscillations of the body. The C. of percussion is the point of a rotating body at which it must strike an obstacle, so that there may be no jar on the axle or hinges. It coincides in position with the C. of oscillation. The C. of pressure of a plane surface immersed in a fluid is the point in which the resultant of the pressures of the fluid meets the surface. This term is sometimes used to denote the metacentre (q.v.). The C. of a lens is a point fixed with reference to the lens having this property: if the part of a ray of light within the lens tends towards the centre, the parts outside of the lens are parallel. In the case of an ordinary double convex lens, the centre is within it. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. n. [Greek] The exact middle point or place of any thing;—the midst;—a point of concentration; nucleus;—a temporary framing on which vaulted work is constructed. Cabinet Dictionary

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