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Definitions of chain

  1. connect or arrange into a chain by linking Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a series of (usually metal) rings or links fitted into one another to make a flexible ligament Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a necklace made by a stringing objects together; "a string of beads" or"a strand of pearls" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. anything that acts as a restraint Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. metal shackles; for hands or legs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a number of similar establishments (stores or restaurants or banks or hotels or theaters) under one ownership Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a series of things depending on each other as if linked together; "the chain of command"; "a complicated concatenation of circumstances" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a series of linked atoms (generally in an organic molecule) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a series of hills or mountains; "the valley was between two ranges of hills"; "the plains lay just beyond the mountain range" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. British biochemist (born in Germany) who isolated and purified penicillin, which had been discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming (1906-1979) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. fasten or secure with chains; "Chain the chairs together" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a necklace made by a stringing objects together; "a string of beads"; "a strand of pearls"; Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. (chemistry) a series of linked atoms (generally in an organic molecule) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a unit of length Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. A series of links or rings, usually of metal, connected, or fitted into one another, used for various purposes, as of support, of restraint, of ornament, of the exertion and transmission of mechanical power, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. That which confines, fetters, or secures, as a chain; a bond; as, the chains of habit. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A series of things linked together; or a series of things connected and following each other in succession; as, a chain of mountains; a chain of events or ideas. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. An instrument which consists of links and is used in measuring land. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Iron links bolted to the side of a vessel to bold the dead-eyes connected with the shrouds; also, the channels. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The warp threads of a web. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To fasten, bind, or connect with a chain; to fasten or bind securely, as with a chain; as, to chain a bulldog. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To keep in slavery; to enslave. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To unite closely and strongly. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To measure with the chain. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To protect by drawing a chain across, as a harbor. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A series of links or rings joined together; a connected series or succession; as, a chain of events. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To fasten, secure, or connect with a chain; fetter; restrain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. In chemistry, a series of atoms held together by one or more affinities. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  29. A series of links or rings passing through one another: a number of things coming after each other: anything that binds: a measure of 100 links, 66 feet long. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To bind with or as with a chain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A series of connected links; a series; a bond; measure of 66 feet. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To bind with a chain; to bind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To fasten, as with a chain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A string of interlinked rings or links; a series; range, as of mountains; a surveyors measuring line of 100 links. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A series of links or rings, connected or fitted into one another; a bond, or anything which binds; bondage; a series linked together; a measure of 100 links, or 66 feet. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To fasten with a chain; to restrain; to connect; to enslave; to obstruct. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. Chains were used, 1. As badges of office; 2. For ornament; 3. For confining prisoners. 4. the gold chain placed about Josephs neck, ( Genesis 41:42 ) and that promised to Daniel, ( Daniel 5:7 ) are instances of the first use. In ( Ezekiel 16:11 ) the chain is mentioned as the symbol of sovereignty. 5. Chains for ornamental purposes were worn by men as well as women. ( Proverbs 1:9 ) Judith 10:4. The Midianites adorned the necks of their camels with chains. ( Judges 8:21 Judges 8:26 ) Step-chains were attached to the ankle-rings. ( Isaiah 3:16 Isaiah 3:18 ) 6. The means adopted for confining prisoners among the Jews were fetters similar to our handcuffs. ( Judges 16:21 ; 2 Samuel 3:34 ; 2 Kings 25:7 ; Jeremiah 39:7 ) Among the Romans the prisoner was handcuffed to his guard, and occasionally to two guards. ( Acts 12:6 Acts 12:7 ; 21:33 ) biblestudytools.com
  38. A part of the insignia of office. A chain of gold was placed about Joseph's neck ( Genesis 41:42 ); and one was promised to ( Daniel 5:7 ). It is used as a symbol of sovereignty (Ezek. 16:11 ). The breast-plate of the high-priest was fastened to the ephod by golden chains ( Exodus 39:17 Exodus 39:21 ). biblestudytools.com
  39. It was used as an ornament ( Proverbs 1:9 ; Cant 1:10 ). The Midianites adorned the necks of their camels with chains (Judg. Proverbs 8:21 Proverbs 8:26 ). biblestudytools.com
  40. Chains were also used as fetters wherewith prisoners were bound ( Judges 16:21 ; 2 Sam 3:34 ; 2 Kings 25:7 ; Jeremiah 39:7 ). Paul was in this manner bound to a Roman soldier ( Acts 28:20 ; Ephesians 6:20 ; 2 Tim 1:16 ). Sometimes, for the sake of greater security, the prisoner was attached by two chains to two soldiers, as in the case of Peter ( Acts 12:6 ). These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Chain". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  41. 1. (From BASIC's "CHAIN" statement) Topass control to a child or successor without going through theoperating system command interpreter that invoked you.The state of the parent program is lost and there is noreturning to it. Though this facility used to be common onmemory-limited microcomputers and is still widely supportedfor backward compatibility, the jargon usage issemi-obsolescent; in particular, Unix calls this exec.Compare with the more modern "subshell".2. A series of linked data areas within anoperating system or application program. "Chain rattling"is the process of repeatedly running through the linked dataareas searching for one which is of interest. The implicationis that there are many links in the chain.3. A possibly infinite, non-decreasing sequence ofelements of some total ordering, Sx0 <= x1 <= x2 ...A chain satisfies:for all x,y in S, x <= y \/ y <= x.I.e. any two elements of a chain are related. ("<=" is written in LaTeX as \sqsubseteq). foldoc_fs
  42. ch[=a]n, n. a series of links or rings passing through one another: a number of things coming after each other: anything that binds: a connected course or train of events: in surveying, often called Gunter's chain, a measure of 100 links, 66 feet long (10 sq. chains make an acre): (pl.) fetters, bonds, confinement generally.--v.t. to fasten: to fetter: to restrain: (Shak.) to embrace.--ns. CHAIN'-ARM'OUR, chain-mail; CHAIN'-BOLT, a large bolt used to secure the chain-plates to the ship's side; CHAIN'-BRIDGE, a bridge suspended on chains: a suspension-bridge; CHAIN'-C[=A]'BLE, a cable composed of iron links.--p.adj. CHAINED, bound or fastened, as with a chain: fitted with a chain.--n. CHAIN'-GANG, a gang of convicts chained together.--adj. CHAIN'LESS, without chains: unfettered.--ns. CHAIN'LET, a small chain; CHAIN'-MAIL, mail or armour made of iron links connected together, much used in Europe in the 12th and 13th centuries; CHAIN'-MOULD'ING, moulding in the form of a chain; CHAIN'-PIER, a pier supported by chains like a chain-bridge.--n.pl. CHAIN'-PLATES, on shipboard, iron plates bolted below the channels to serve as attachments for the dead-eyes, through which the standing rigging or shrouds and back-stays are rove and secured.--ns. CHAIN'-PUMP, a pump consisting of buckets or plates fastened to an endless iron chain, and used for raising water; CHAIN'-RULE, an arithmetical rule, so called from the terms of the problem being stated as equations, and connected, as if by a chain, so as to obtain by one operation the same result as would be obtained by a number of different operations in simple proportion: the rule for solving problems by compound proportion; CHAIN'-SHOT, two bullets or half-bullets fastened together by a chain, used formerly in naval engagements to destroy rigging, now replaced by case-shot and shrapnel-shell; CHAIN'-STITCH, a peculiar kind of stitch resembling the links of a chain; CHAIN'-WORK, work consisting of threads, cords, &c., wrought with open spaces like the links of a chain: network. [Fr. chaine--L. cat[=e]na.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  43. Connected series of metal or other links (ENDLESS c.); fetters, confinement, restraining force; necklace, watch-guard, &c.; sequence, series, set, (of proof, events, posts, mountains; ladies\' c., movement in quadrille); jointed metal-rod measuring-line, its length (66 ft); (also c.-shot) two balls or half balls joined by c. for cutting masts &c.; (Naut.) fastening for shrouds below CHANNEL2 (also c.-plate), the cc. (also the fore, mizen, main,-cc.), whole contrivance (channel, c.-plate, & DEAD-eyes) for widening basis of shrouds; c.-armour, -mail, made of interlaced rings; c.-bridge, =suspension; c.-coupling, extra coupling of railway vans in case of accident to screw-coupling; c.-moulding, archit. ornament with link carving; c.-stitch, ornamental sewing like chain, (sewing machine) simple sewing (cf. LOCK 3-stitch); c.-wale, =CHANNEL2; c.-wheel, transferring power by c. fitted to its edge; hence chainless a., chainlet n. (Vb) secure, confine, with c. (lit. & fig.). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. A series of links joined together in a line; also any linear arrangement of similar parts. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  45. n. [Latin] A series of links or rings connected and fitted into one another for use or ornament;—a fetter or manacle;—a neck ornament;—a range as of mountains;—a succession of events or ideas;—a line for measuring land, being 100 links, equal to 66 feet;—a strong iron plate bolted to a ship's side. Cabinet Dictionary
  46. A series of links fastened one within another; a bond, a manacle, a fetter; a line of links with which land is measured; a series linked together. Complete Dictionary

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