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Definitions of chamber

  1. a room used primarily for sleeping Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. place in a chamber Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a natural or artificial enclosed space Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a room where a judge transacts business Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an enclosed volume (as the aqueous chamber of the eyeball or the chambers of the heart) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a deliberative or legislative or administrative or judicial assembly; "the upper chamber is the senate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. A retired room, esp. an upper room used for sleeping; a bedroom; as, the house had four chambers. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Apartments in a lodging house. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A hall, as where a king gives audience, or a deliberative body or assembly meets; as, presence chamber; senate chamber. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A legislative or judicial body; an assembly; a society or association; as, the Chamber of Deputies; the Chamber of Commerce. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A compartment or cell; an inclosed space or cavity; as, the chamber of a canal lock; the chamber of a furnace; the chamber of the eye. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A room or rooms where a lawyer transacts business; a room or rooms where a judge transacts such official business as may be done out of court. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A chamber pot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. A cavity in a mine, usually of a cubical form, to contain the powder. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A short piece of ordnance or cannon, which stood on its breech, without any carriage, formerly used chiefly for rejoicings and theatrical cannonades. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To reside in or occupy a chamber or chambers. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To be lascivious. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To shut up, as in a chamber. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To furnish with a chamber; as, to chamber a gun. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A legislative or judicial body; an assembly; a society or association; as, the of Deputies; the of Commerce. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; - formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. An apartment; especially, a bedroom; a private room; a political or commercial body; a cavity; that part of a gun, etc., which contains the charge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. A compartment or enclosed space. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  24. An apartment: the place where an assembly meets: an assembly or body of men met for some purpose, as a chamber of commerce: a hall of justice: the back end of the bore of a gun. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. CHAMBERED. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. CHAMBERING, in B., lewd behavior. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A private room; sleeping-room; part of a gun which holds the charge. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. A room, especially a bedroom; any enclosed space, as at the breech of a gun. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. An apartment; a lawyer's apartment or office; a judge's room; hired lodgings; a place where an assembly meets; the assembly itself; a hall of justice or legislation; a legislative body; a company for the promotion of some common interest; a hollow or cavity; that part of the bore of a gun where the powder lies; a place underground for holding powder and bombs; a place, generally of a cubical form, where the powder is confined. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To shut up as in a chamber. Chambers of a lock, the space between the gates of a lock in a canal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To reside in or occupy as a chamber; to be wanton. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. Immodest behavior. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. "on the wall," which the Shunammite prepared for the prophet Elisha ( 2 Kings 4:10 ), was an upper chamber over the porch through the hall toward the street. This was the "guest chamber" where entertainments were prepared ( Mark 14:14 ). There were also "chambers within chambers" ( 1 Kings 22:25 ; 2 Kings 9:2 ). To enter into a chamber is used metaphorically of prayer and communion with God ( Isaiah 26:20 ). The "chambers of the south" ( Job 9:9 ) are probably the constelations of the southern hemisphere. The "chambers of imagery", i.e., chambers painted with images, as used by ( Ezekiel 8:12 ), is an expression denoting the vision the prophet had of the abominations practised by the Jews in Jerusalem. biblestudytools.com
  35. ( Genesis 43:30 ; 2 Samuel 18:33 ; Psalms 19:5 ; Daniel 6:10 ) The word chamber in these passages has much the same significance as with us, meaning the private rooms of the house --the guest chamber, as with us, meaning a room set apart for the accommodation of the visiting friend. ( Mark 14:14 Mark 14:15 ; Luke 22:12 ) The upper chamber was used more particularly for the lodgment of strangers. ( Acts 9:37 ) [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  36. It was formerly hold that no freehold estate could be had in a chamber, but it was afterwards ruled otherwise. When a chamber belongs to one person, and the rest of the house with the land is owned by another the two estates are considered as two separate but adjoining dwelling house's. Co. Litt. 48, b; Bro. Ab. Demand, 20; 4 Mass. 575; 6 N. H. Rep. 555; 9 Pick. R. 297; vide 3 Leon. 210; 3 Watts. R. 243. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. . By chamber is also understood the place where an assembly is held; and, by the use of a figure, the assembly itself is called a chamber. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  38. That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns. dictgcide_fs
  39. ch[=a]m'b[.e]r, n. an apartment: the place where an assembly meets: an assembly or body of men met for some purpose, as a chamber of commerce: a hall of justice: a compartment: a cavity: the back end of the bore of a gun.--v.t. to put in a chamber: to confine.--v.i. to be wanton.--ns. CHAM'BER-COUN'CIL (Shak.), a private or secret council; CHAM'BER-COUN'SEL, -COUN'SELLOR, a counsel who gives his advice privately, but does not plead in court.--adj. CHAM'BERED.--ns. CHAM'BERER, a man of intrigue: (Shak.) a gallant; CHAM'BER-FELL'OW, one occupying the same chamber.--n.pl. CHAM'BER-HANG'INGS (Shak.), the hangings or tapestry of a chamber.--ns. CHAM'BERING (B.), lewd behaviour; CHAM'BER-LYE (Shak.), urine; CHAM'BER-MAID, a female servant who has the care of bedrooms; CHAM'BER-POT, a necessary bedroom vessel--often merely CHAM'BER; CHAM'BER-PRAC'TICE, the business of a chamber-counsellor (q.v.). [Fr. chambre--L. camera--Gr. kamara, a vault, a room.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. A term used in speaking of the eye, in which there are two chambers, Cam'erae oc'uli :-an anterior and a posterior; (F.) Chambre anterieure et posterieure. The anterior is the space between the cornea and the anterior part of the iris: - the posterior, the space between the iris and anterior surface of the crystalline. They are filled with the aqueous humour, and communicate by the opening in the pupil. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  41. Room, esp. bedroom (poet. or archaic; but c.-music, for performance in room, not at theatre, church, &c.; c.-concert, of c.-music); (pl.) set of rooms in larger building, esp. in Inns of Court, let separately, judge\'s room for hearing cases not needing to be taken in court; (hall used by) deliberative or judicial body, one of the houses of a parliament; C. of Commerce, Agriculture, board organized to forward these in a district; (also c.-pot) vessel for urine; c.-counsel, lawyer giving opinions in private, not practising in court; chambermaid, housemaid at inn; enclosed space in body of animal or plant, or in machinery &c. (esp. part of gun-bore, of larger diameter in some cannon, separate in revolver, that contains charge). Hence (-) chambered2 a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. An enclosed space. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  43. [L.] The cell in a mine or gun, where the powder is deposited. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  44. n. [Latin,] A retired room, especially an upper room, used for lodging, privacy, or study;—a compartment or hollow closed space;—a place where an assembly meets, and the assembly itself. Cabinet Dictionary
  45. An apartment in house, generally used for those appropriated to lodging; any retired room; any cavity or hollow; a court of justice; the hollow part of a gun where the charge is lodged; the cavity where the powder is lodged in a mine. Complete Dictionary

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