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Definitions of club

  1. a team of professional baseball players who play and travel together; "each club played six home games with teams in its own division" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. strike with a club or a bludgeon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. unite with a common purpose; "The two men clubbed together" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. stout stick that is larger at one end; "he carried a club in self defense"; "he felt as if he had been hit with a club" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a playing card in the minor suit of clubs (having one or more black trefoils on it); "he led a small club"; "clubs were trumps" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a building occupied by a club; "the clubhouse needed a new roof" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. golf equipment used by a golfer to hit a golf ball Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. gather and spend time together; "They always club together" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. A heavy staff of wood, usually tapering, and wielded the hand; a weapon; a cudgel. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Any card of the suit of cards having a figure like the trefoil or clover leaf. (pl.) The suit of cards having such figure. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. An association of persons for the promotion of some common object, as literature, science, politics, good fellowship, etc.; esp. an association supported by equal assessments or contributions of the members. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A joint charge of expense, or any person's share of it; a contribution to a common fund. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To beat with a club. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To throw, or allow to fall, into confusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To unite, or contribute, for the accomplishment of a common end; as, to club exertions. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To raise, or defray, by a proportional assesment; as, to club the expense. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To form a club; to combine for the promotion of some common object; to unite. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To pay on equal or proportionate share of a common charge or expense; to pay for something by contribution. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To drift in a current with an anchor out. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A heavy stick; one of the suits of playing cards; a number of persons associated for a common purpose or mutual benefit. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To beat with a cudgel; to give to a common expense. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To combine for a common purpose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Clubbed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Clubbing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. An association of persons for the promotion of a common object, as literature, politics, pleasure, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To join together for some common end: to share in a common expense:-pr.p. clubbing; pa.p. clubbed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. A heavy tapering stick, knobby or massy at one end, used to strike with: a cudgel: one of the four suits of cards (called in Sp. bastos, cudgels or clubs). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. An association of persons for a common purpose; a heavy stick; one of the suits of cards. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To join in a club. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To unite for a purpose; contribute to a common fund; to strike with a club; wield as a club. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To beat with a club; use like a club. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A stout stick; cudgel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A black three - lobed spot on a playing card; a card so marked. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To contribute to a common purpose; combine; join; form a club. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. An organization of persons, as for social intercourse; a club house or club - room. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A stick or piece of wood, with one end thicker and heavier than the other; a thick heavy stick; a stick bent and weighted at the end for driving a ball; a knot; one of the four suits of cards, so named from the emblem which it bears among the Spauiards, though with us its emblem is the trefoil. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A number of persons associated for the promotion of some common purpose, as of social intercourse, literature, science, politics, &c., and who are usually governed by certain self-imposed regulations or by-laws; the collective body of members composing a club, or who support a club-house; a share or proportion paid to form a common stock, or the fund thus raised; joint charge or effort. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To beat with a club. To club the musket, to wield it so as to beat with the butt-end. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To combine means for a purpose, each contributor paying an equal share. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To join as in a club; to pay an equal proportion of a common reckoning or charge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. A stick with one end heavier than the other; a thick heavy stick or cudgel for beating or defence; a principal war weapon in ancient times, and now in barbarous countries; a number of persons associated for some common purpose; the name of one of the suits of cards. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To unite for some common end; to pay a share of a common reckoning; to beat with a club; to turn up and place together the club-ends of a number of rifles. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. A heavy staff of wood, usually tapering, and wielded with the hand; a weapon; a cudgel. dictgcide_fs
  46. klub, n. a heavy tapering stick, knobby or massy at one end, used to strike with: a cudgel: a bat used in certain games: an instrument for playing golf, variously with wooden heads, iron heads, and wooden heads with brass soles: a bunch; one of the four suits of cards: a combination: a clique, set: an association of persons for the joint study of literature, politics, &c., or for social ends: an association of persons who possess a building as a common resort for the members: a club-house, or the house occupied by a club.--v.t. to beat with a club: to gather into a bunch: to combine: to throw soldiers into confusion.--v.i. to join together for some common end: to combine together: to share in a common expense.--adjs. CLUB'BABLE, sociable; CLUBBED, like a club.--n. CLUB'BING, beating: combination: a disease in some plants.--adj. CLUB'BISH, given to clubs.--ns. CLUB'BISM, the club system; CLUB'BIST, CLUB'-FOOT, a deformed foot.--adj. CLUB'-FOOT'ED.--n. CLUB'-GRASS, a species of grass having a club-shaped articulation.--v.t. CLUB'-HAUL, (naut.), to tack by dropping the lee anchor and slipping the cable.--adj. CLUB'HEAD'ED, having a thick head.--ns. CLUB'-HOUSE, a house for the accommodation of a club; CLUB'-LAW, government by violence; CLUB'-MAN, one who carries a club: a member of a club; CLUB'-MAS'TER, the manager of, or purveyor for, a club; CLUB'-MOSS, one of the four genera of Lycopodiaceæ; CLUB'-ROOM, the room in which a club meets; CLUB'-RUSH, a plant of many varieties of the genus Scripus or rush.--n.pl. CLUBS (see CLUMPS). [Ice. and Sw. klubba; same root as CLUMP.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. 1. Stick with one thick end as weapon (Indian cc., pair swung to develop muscles; c.-law, rule by physical force); kinds of stick used in games, esp. golf; structure or organ in Bot. &c. with knob at end; c.-foot (ed), (with) congenitally distorted foot; c.-moss, kind with upright spikes of spore-cases; c.-root, disease of turnips &c.; playing-card of suit bearing black trefoil (cc., the suit). 2. Association of persons united by some common interest meeting periodically for co-operation (Alpine, golf, yacht, BENEFIT, c.) or conviviality; body of persons with cooptation by ballot combined for social purposes& having premises (c.-house) for resort, meals, temporary residence, &c. (c.-land, St James\'s in London, where cc. cluster), whence clubdom n., club-less a. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. Beat with c.; use butt of (gun) as c.; bring, come, into a mass; contribute (money, ideas) to common stock; (intr.) combine together, with, for joint action, making up a sum, &c.; (Mil.) get (one\'s men) into a confused mass. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. n. [Hebrew] [German] A heavy staff or piece of wood, to be wielded with the hand; —one of the four suits of cards, having a figure resembling the clover-leaf. [Anglo-Saxon] An association for social converse, or for the promotion of some common object; —the share of expense in such an association. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. A heavy stick; the name of one of the suits of cards; the shot or dividend of a reckoning ; an assembly of good fellows; concurrence, contribution, joint charge. Complete Dictionary

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